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Old 07-31-2011, 07:48 PM
 
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When using Skype, Yahoo Messenger and Face Time with video, I am only getting mediocre images. Is there any messenger that transfers high resolution quality video? New web cams are all specified with high res video (1080p). What is the purpose?
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Old 07-31-2011, 07:54 PM
 
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Just because they say 1080p does not at all guarantee quality.

It also depends greatly on your connection speed as well as the other end.

To be frank, there isn't a grand solution for video chat/conferencing right now. Skype and Google both make solid video chat portals, as well as Apple. They're all around the same as far as quality potential.
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Old 07-31-2011, 08:00 PM
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Location: Ohio
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kazyn View Post
It also depends greatly on your connection speed as well as the other end.
Great point.

The average home Internet connection doesn't have enough upload speed to send 1080p video to the other end. That's the biggest obstacle right now, not processor speed and not camera quality.
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Old 07-31-2011, 08:45 PM
 
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But how do people watch Netflix movies over the internet?
Also, what about video over 4G wireless networks (not internet)?
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Old 07-31-2011, 08:55 PM
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Location: Ohio
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oberon_1 View Post
But how do people watch Netflix movies over the internet?
Also, what about video over 4G wireless networks (not internet)?
Netflix and other streaming services are a DOWNLOAD, not an upload. You have to UPLOAD to send video to the other end.

The average home Internet connection has less than 1 mb/s upload speed and somewhere around 3x to 80x that much download speed.

AFAIK, wireless Internet providers have a similar ratio of download/upload speed, so using wireless wouldn't help.
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Old 08-01-2011, 12:09 AM
 
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Correct, nearly all home connections are asynchronous, meaning that the pipe is split un-evenly, because most people download FAR more than they upload.
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Old 08-01-2011, 02:53 AM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
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Originally Posted by kazyn View Post
Correct, nearly all home connections are asynchronous, meaning that the pipe is split un-evenly, because most people download FAR more than they upload.
You mean asymmetric. The A in ADSL stands for asymmetric. The S in SDSL stands for symmetric.
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Old 08-01-2011, 04:38 AM
 
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Originally Posted by oberon_1 View Post
But how do people watch Netflix movies over the internet?
Full quality HD is about 25mbps on bluray, about the same for HDV camcorders that record to tape and I believe in the 14 to 15mbps range for cams that record to flash.

Most people don't have the bandwidth to download at those speeds let alone upload. Netflix "HD" I believe uses a bitrate of about 4mbps and I would assume lower resolution than full HD. Generally speaking you need a minimum bitrate of around 8 to 10mbps for full HD from my experience without seeing some substantial degradation of the quality.

There is two main factors involved that will determine the bitrate, resolution and the codec. For example if you're encoding for DVD at a resolution of 720*480 using MPEG2 the sweet spot is 6mbps. You can lower it to around 4mbps, if you go below that you'll start to get macroblocking. If you want to go below 4mbps you lower the resolution, you lose detail but avoid macroblocking. You can go up to about 8mbps and anything more is just going to generate a larger file in most cases. For poorly recorded material such as home movies on VHS typically recorded without a tripod you'll want to max it out to 9.8mbps because all the noise and movement taxes the encoder. That same 720*480 video could be encoded in the 1 to 2mbps range with a more efficient codec like WMV.

Having said all that a 1mbps SD video would look really good for video conferencing using a codec like WMV or similar but you're not even going to get that because it's still higher than a lot of connections...
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Old 08-01-2011, 02:25 PM
 
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In our area (NY), VIOS and OPTONLINE are advertising internet (download) speeds of 20M and 40M respectively...
My feeling is that real bottleneck may be Skype servers which provide very limited bandwidths, more so then the ISP.
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Old 08-01-2011, 03:15 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MediocreButArrogant View Post
You mean asymmetric. The A in ADSL stands for asymmetric. The S in SDSL stands for symmetric.
You're right, slip of the tongue.


Quote:
Originally Posted by oberon_1 View Post
In our area (NY), VIOS and OPTONLINE are advertising internet (download) speeds of 20M and 40M respectively...
My feeling is that real bottleneck may be Skype servers which provide very limited bandwidths, more so then the ISP.

Skype is peer-to-peer. You use their service to connect to each other, other than that there is nothing in your way. Skype does not affect your throughput whatsoever.

Also, just because you get 40mb/s down, doesn't mean you can download or upload something @ 40mb/s. Also, your upload speed is equally important, as stated several times.....so if you have 1000mb/s down and 2mb up, your quality will still suffer.
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