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Old 05-22-2012, 04:26 PM
Status: "Status edited!" (set 2 days ago)
 
Location: Sierra Nevada Land, CA
4,646 posts, read 3,372,614 times
Reputation: 2953

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chi-turtle View Post
I currently have 16MB with Pro Boost with Comcast that comes as a package with basic TV package.

The problem I have is I want to cancel my TV portion (since I never watch TV, I download shows) and possibly invest in Netflix streaming for less than $10 a month.

The next step down from what I have is 6Megs and the Comcast rep is telling me that the connection won't be stable enough for one person and probably won't be able to stream movies very well. I don't know if I believe that. I've streamed with less, my last place I test connected and I had 1Meg and it was fine.

Cost for 16Megs with Pro Boost Internet = $69

Cost for 6Megs NO Pro Boost Internet = $25

Can just one person with wireless internet for a computer, ipad2, and ps3 be okay. I'd stream netflix through the PS3 or laptop. I do some PC gaming on the internet but not too hardcore and I download movies/shows but I don't care about if it's 20 min vs an hour to download it.

What do you guys think? Is 6Megs enough for me? I can't help but think Comcast is full of it and trying to screw me in to thinking I need the more expensive package.
Netflix says, for streaming movies, you need 1.2 meg minimum. 3megs for full on 1080HD. I have honest 1.5meg (tested it) and its fine for my Roku 720 HD box.
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Old 05-22-2012, 04:44 PM
 
16,310 posts, read 14,774,445 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJBest View Post
I didn't realize that people didn't know the difference. I suppose this would be a good time to point out to the OP and other folks the difference to avoid confusion.

What's with your attitude? I don't work in advertising so I don't know how ISPs advertise. I know the products and their speeds.
You didn't realize that not everyone is up to speed with the nuances of technical terms.......mm.ooo.'kay, but that has been demonstrated many times throughout these threads.

Frankly because I have a hard time believing that someone that is computer literate has not witnessed the confusion by nobs many times. You have posted hundreds and hundreds posts here, and I'm guessing work in the industry and have never seen this confusion, or even friends or family?

The purpose of these threads is to give factual information to novices simply are looking for a little help. To inject confusion into the discussion by calling 6MB extremely fast misleading information, for the simple reason 99% of novices will read that as 6 Megabits/sec, and many others as merely a typo or lazy finger on the shift key.
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Old 05-22-2012, 04:47 PM
 
16,310 posts, read 14,774,445 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr5150 View Post
Netflix says, for streaming movies, you need 1.2 meg minimum. 3megs for full on 1080HD. I have honest 1.5meg (tested it) and its fine for my Roku 720 HD box.
That pretty much matches what I see graphed by DD-WRT as I get bursts at about 6 meg, about 50% of the time, then idle 50% of the time.
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Old 05-22-2012, 06:15 PM
 
23,265 posts, read 17,639,241 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr5150 View Post
3megs for full on 1080HD.
It might be 1080 but it's certainly not HD in all it's glory. Bluray is encoded at 25Mbps, even at 8Mbps you're going to have a difference..... At 3Mbps you're making some pretty large compromises. I'm surprised they would offer 1080 at that low a bitrate, you're usually better off dropping the resolution. You'll lose detail but the detail you do have is going to be lot crisper and cleaner.
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Old 05-23-2012, 04:15 AM
 
Location: Chicago
36,588 posts, read 57,867,463 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kazyn View Post
There are several factors besides speed that could have been the issue (or still is the issue and you don't know/realize it).
Such as?
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Old 05-23-2012, 08:45 AM
 
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
6,079 posts, read 6,177,278 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thecoalman View Post
Bluray is encoded at 25Mbps, even at 8Mbps you're going to have a difference.....
That's 2 different things though. Encoding a Bluray and streaming content aren't the same thing. It doesn't mean you need to stream 25M or it's not HD quality.
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Old 05-23-2012, 09:33 AM
 
2,187 posts, read 2,659,028 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drover View Post
Such as?
Most commonly your own in-house hardware. Router might need resetting or updating, switch might be going nuts, your NIC might be set to half duplex or something stupid like that, it could be a number of things.

If you run a speedtest do you get your advertised speeds?
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Old 05-23-2012, 09:37 AM
 
23,265 posts, read 17,639,241 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peregrine View Post
Encoding a Bluray and streaming content aren't the same thing.
Yes they are. The only thing that differs is where the source of the video is coming from. If I encode a video and burn it to bluray or upload it to server it's still the same file...


Quote:
It doesn't mean you need to stream 25M or it's not HD quality.
You don't have too and it's certainly not practical. My point of course is that if you want to see HD in all it's glory that's the kind of bitrate you need.

This first screenshot is from DV, it's SD but the same principals apply:





This is same frame encoded using MPEG2 @ 8Mbps, typically commercial DVD's are encoded using 6Mbps. The reason it's so high is because MPEG2 is not as efficient as a modern codec, you can get same results with 2Mbps using more modern codec



Doesn't look like there is nay difference between the two? As a practical matter not really, you're not going to notice it but if we zoom in MPEG2 on the left and DV on the right:





As you keep reducing the bitrate it gets worse, here's 3Mbps which is far too low for this resolution and MPEG2:




Whether you're going to notice this depends on a lot of things. For example the lights in this video are moving very fast hence the reason they exhibit macroblocking and the people don't. If you have a really large TV and are sitting close to it? There is lot of factors and if you've worked with video a lot like me you see it all the time because you know it's there unfortunately.
Attached Thumbnails
Is 6MB bandwidth from Comcast enough?-zoom.jpg  

Last edited by thecoalman; 05-23-2012 at 10:08 AM..
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Old 05-23-2012, 09:12 PM
 
Location: Chicago
36,588 posts, read 57,867,463 times
Reputation: 25609
Quote:
Originally Posted by kazyn View Post
Most commonly your own in-house hardware. Router might need resetting or updating, switch might be going nuts, your NIC might be set to half duplex or something stupid like that, it could be a number of things.

If you run a speedtest do you get your advertised speeds?
When I had DSL, speed tests were consistently within 500kbps of the advertised 6mbps; now that I have fiber optic it's also within 500kbps of the advertised 12mbps. And my provider doesn't do traffic-shaping.
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Old 05-28-2012, 11:16 PM
 
Location: Cartersville, GA
1,084 posts, read 1,247,865 times
Reputation: 780
Generally, bandwidth becomes a problem when multiple devices are using the internet connection simultaneously. If you rarely have more than one computer or device accessing the internet, you can generally get by with a slower connection. However, if you have others in your household that use the internet while you are watching TV though Roku (or a similar device,) you may need a faster connection. You may also need more bandwidth if you have more than one television streaming video simultaneously.

It's also possible to get a dedicated internet connection for video streaming, and a separate internet connection for the computers in your household. The cost of two low-speed connections might be less that the cost of a high speed connection. Two internet connections may not be possible with cable modem, and it would probably require two telephone lines for DSL. However, you could do this with DSL for the streaming and cable modem for the computers (or vice-versa.) This is probably only a theoretical possibility for most home users. As others have said, a single connection will probably be good enough. It would also be quite complex to setup two connections, and you may have the additional expense of a second modem and a second router.

Start with the lower speed. If you get choppy video, or if the internet is too slow on your computer when video is streaming, then upgrade to a faster speed.
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