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Old 02-21-2011, 04:21 PM
 
Location: Tower of Heaven
4,023 posts, read 5,962,820 times
Reputation: 1427

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The Census counted 120,031 more Iowans in 2010, a 4% increase from a decade earlier. More than half of that growth (58%) came from Hispanics. The number of Hispanics hit 151,544, up from 82,473 in 2000 an 84% increase.

Iowa population shifts from rural to urban - USATODAY.com
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Old 02-21-2011, 10:33 PM
 
2,652 posts, read 7,346,456 times
Reputation: 1863
Not much going on in rural Iowa these days. Once the kids leave for college, there is absolutely nothing for them to return to.
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Old 02-21-2011, 10:44 PM
 
Location: Here, or there
214 posts, read 556,462 times
Reputation: 181
The of Rural to Urban is nation wide.
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Old 02-22-2011, 11:17 AM
 
10,664 posts, read 20,253,705 times
Reputation: 9766
It's been going on in Iowa for a couple generations now.

If you use the same counties for what make up today's metro areas and look back between 1950 and 2010, you get some huge changes:

Des Moines:
1950: 295,757
2010: 569,633

Cedar Rapids:
1950: 146,331
2010: 257,940

Iowa City:
1950: 65,313
2010: 152,586

Total of the three:
1950: 507,401
2010: 980,159

Total change:

Iowa as whole: 425,282
3 metro areas: 472,758

Some that are pretty flat:

Waterloo:
1950: 133,054
2010: 167,819

Dubuque:
1950: 71,337
2010: 93,653

The small towns that are basically just drifting:

Clinton:
1950: 49,116
2010: 49,664

Burlington
1950: 42,056
2010: 40,325

Some of the rural counties have really fallen in the past century:

Audubon County:
1900: 13,626
2010: 6,119

Taylor County:
1900: 18,784
2010: 6,317

Adams County:
1900: 13,601
2010: 4,029

Pocahontas County:
1940: 16,266
2010: 7,310
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Old 02-22-2011, 04:36 PM
 
2,652 posts, read 7,346,456 times
Reputation: 1863
Wonder if illegal immigration has anything to do with this trend? Hard to live off a job in rural Iowa that pays below minimum wage, which is probably what a lot of the illegals make. You often hear about the meat packing plants and such getting raided by ICE, over and over. The penalties must not be stiff enough to make them stop doing it.

Whether you are for or against, seems sort of like legalized slavery to me. Hire people to work jobs at a salary below poverty level, and the most they get is a slap on the wrist...
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Old 02-23-2011, 02:53 AM
 
3,147 posts, read 2,585,372 times
Reputation: 1838
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago60614 View Post
It's been going on in Iowa for a couple generations now.

If you use the same counties for what make up today's metro areas and look back between 1950 and 2010, you get some huge changes:

Des Moines:
1950: 295,757
2010: 569,633

Cedar Rapids:
1950: 146,331
2010: 257,940

Iowa City:
1950: 65,313
2010: 152,586

Total of the three:
1950: 507,401
2010: 980,159

Total change:

Iowa as whole: 425,282
3 metro areas: 472,758

Some that are pretty flat:

Waterloo:
1950: 133,054
2010: 167,819

Dubuque:
1950: 71,337
2010: 93,653

The small towns that are basically just drifting:

Clinton:
1950: 49,116
2010: 49,664

Burlington
1950: 42,056
2010: 40,325

Some of the rural counties have really fallen in the past century:

Audubon County:
1900: 13,626
2010: 6,119

Taylor County:
1900: 18,784
2010: 6,317

Adams County:
1900: 13,601
2010: 4,029

Pocahontas County:
1940: 16,266
2010: 7,310
As a child I lived in Taylor county and went to school in Adams county... I am now a happy resident of Denver, CO. But I would consider returning to Iowa if Des Moines continues the upward trend it is on, I love watching that place evolve into a real city.

Also, it is a pretty big surprise that Adams county has less people than Taylor county... if I didn't live there growing up, I would have never been there... NOTHING happens in that county. At least Corning (the county seat of Adams) had the race track and the skatepark. (which I was on the committee to build, and basically kick-started the project myself.)

We spent most of our time as teenagers/young adults in Des Moines... at least gas was cheaper then...
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Old 02-25-2011, 01:00 PM
 
Location: Iowa
2,188 posts, read 2,589,022 times
Reputation: 2455
Does anyone favor the idea of consolidating some of the lower population counties ? Especially with Adams and Union County, since Creston is almost on the border of Adams County anyway. I saw a brief story about consolidation a few weeks ago but don't know if anything will come of it. If they are looking for things to cut and want to make state and local government more efficient, that seem like a better way to go, IMO.

I really don't think people get as much bang for thier tax dollars with courthouses and higher paid county officials rather than better roads, schools or maybe (god forbid) a tax break.
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Old 02-25-2011, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Des Moines
586 posts, read 1,818,302 times
Reputation: 372
I think both sides of the political spectrum can agree on this as an idea to streamline government. The reality of how to practically roll this out so that it's implemented is a challenge though. Do you provide a carrot to get counties to consolidate on their own, or a stick by mandating it from the state legislature?
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Old 02-25-2011, 07:15 PM
 
Location: Iowa
2,188 posts, read 2,589,022 times
Reputation: 2455
It is a challenge, the counties being merged would need to be offered something they want or need more. Tax breaks, infrastructure, better roads, perhaps a shuttle service once a week to take elderly people to the new county seat from their town. Better to try the carrot approach first, the savings from consolidation would leave plenty for state and local to fight over.

Would be nice to see some proposals from the legeslature or governors office, someone that is good at negotiations and deal making. Media support is important as well, someone needs to crunch the numbers and analyze the situation, and make a report for public consumption.
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Old 04-02-2011, 10:37 PM
 
414 posts, read 928,266 times
Reputation: 198
If the rural counties continue to lose population...will it become almost non existant in the future? It would probably go back to natural prairie land or forests? That would be interesting change. I hope Des Moines metro area uses smart growth plan...not sprawling metro area that spread out too much. Seattle and Portland uses smart growth system.
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