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Old 02-20-2013, 12:01 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
How is it that you hear all these accents when I'm lucky to hear one once every two weeks? I've lived my whole life in this city and insist that whatever you've heard isn't the norm for this city. And I really hope you're not stereotyping St. Louis as a bunch of inbred, rednecks, because if you are, you have NEVER visited here. And the simple fact he gets that question all the time proves he's an anomaly to the area. Keep in mind that just because you hear an accent doesn't mean the culture and demographics follow suit.

The one with the heavy drawl I am speaking of...I met him about 7 years ago. The others I have met over the years, mostly when I lived in SE Iowa or when I was visting St Louis (used to go there quite often when I lived closer). I recall more than one waitress while visiting asking "what'll ya'll have?"

I am NOT stereotyping anyone. I don't liken a southern accent to "rednecks" automatically.
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Old 02-20-2013, 12:40 PM
 
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ElleTea is right, a lot of Missouri does have a southern accent. They pronounce it Missouruh for a reason.

Even when you cross I-35 into Missouri you'll hear it at a gas station, mcdonalds, etc. You do find it in southern Iowa as well, but not quite to the same extent.

I've noticed once you get into the actual larger cities some people have it and some don't. I used to travel to Kansas City/St Louis a lot and would notice it in both. Even the major cities that are actually in the south (Dallas, Houston, Atlanta) not everyone who is from there has the southern accent, but a lot do, probably the majority of natives to an extent.
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Old 02-20-2013, 01:09 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RonnieJonez View Post
ElleTea is right, a lot of Missouri does have a southern accent. They pronounce it Missouruh for a reason.

Even when you cross I-35 into Missouri you'll hear it at a gas station, mcdonalds, etc. You do find it in southern Iowa as well, but not quite to the same extent.

I've noticed once you get into the actual larger cities some people have it and some don't. I used to travel to Kansas City/St Louis a lot and would notice it in both. Even the major cities that are actually in the south (Dallas, Houston, Atlanta) not everyone who is from there has the southern accent, but a lot do, probably the majority of natives to an extent.
Oh. My. God. We agree on something!?

Missouri was the first place I ever saw grits on a menu. I am pretty sure that was in the St Louis area. That says something about the southern influence, I would say!
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Old 02-20-2013, 01:19 PM
 
Location: Sioux Falls, SD area
2,956 posts, read 4,376,353 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RonnieJonez View Post
ElleTea is right, a lot of Missouri does have a southern accent. They pronounce it Missouruh for a reason.

Even when you cross I-35 into Missouri you'll hear it at a gas station, mcdonalds, etc. You do find it in southern Iowa as well, but not quite to the same extent.

I've noticed once you get into the actual larger cities some people have it and some don't. I used to travel to Kansas City/St Louis a lot and would notice it in both. Even the major cities that are actually in the south (Dallas, Houston, Atlanta) not everyone who is from there has the southern accent, but a lot do, probably the majority of natives to an extent.
My wife and I have always talked about this in Kansas City. Most people in the city don't have any southern dialect, but just go outside of the city and you are in the south.

Accents are really what you're used to. In southeastern South Dakota where I live, we don't talk much different from what you here on the network tv news. I didn't think we had anything that you can call an "accent". However, we must have something that can set us apart to some people.

Many years ago, we took a vacation to Lake of the Ozarks in southern Missouri. We parked several blocks down from this restaurant. We sat down and started ordering and the waitress said we talked funny and stated that ya'all is from the Dakotas. She didn't say Minnesota, Iowa or even the north, but nailed it as the "Dakotas". I for the life of me can't figure out how she could nail us down based on how we spoke. We must have swore once or twice.
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Old 02-20-2013, 01:57 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,068,055 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RonnieJonez View Post
ElleTea is right, a lot of Missouri does have a southern accent. They pronounce it Missouruh for a reason.

Even when you cross I-35 into Missouri you'll hear it at a gas station, mcdonalds, etc. You do find it in southern Iowa as well, but not quite to the same extent.

I've noticed once you get into the actual larger cities some people have it and some don't. I used to travel to Kansas City/St Louis a lot and would notice it in both. Even the major cities that are actually in the south (Dallas, Houston, Atlanta) not everyone who is from there has the southern accent, but a lot do, probably the majority of natives to an extent.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ElleTea View Post
Oh. My. God. We agree on something!?

Missouri was the first place I ever saw grits on a menu. I am pretty sure that was in the St Louis area. That says something about the southern influence, I would say!
I have never seen grits on a menu around here except at cracker barrel. Hardly any restaurants feature them. Next you're going to tell me that you've monuments to Jefferson Davis here. I have The accent you are hearing is a south midland accent in most of missouri, not a southern accent, as professional linguists indicate. Oh wait, you know better than them, silly me. If you want to believe st. louis is southern, go right ahead. It speaks to yours and ronniejonez ignorance of irrefutable evidence to the contrary in terms of culture, linguistics, demographics. You wont find grits in most parts of missouri except the far southern portions of the state. Everywhere else, they are rare.

Last edited by stlouisan; 02-20-2013 at 03:17 PM..
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Old 02-20-2013, 02:08 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,068,055 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jmgg View Post
My wife and I have always talked about this in Kansas City. Most people in the city don't have any southern dialect, but just go outside of the city and you are in the south.

Accents are really what you're used to. In southeastern South Dakota where I live, we don't talk much different from what you here on the network tv news. I didn't think we had anything that you can call an "accent". However, we must have something that can set us apart to some people.

Many years ago, we took a vacation to Lake of the Ozarks in southern Missouri. We parked several blocks down from this restaurant. We sat down and started ordering and the waitress said we talked funny and stated that ya'all is from the Dakotas. She didn't say Minnesota, Iowa or even the north, but nailed it as the "Dakotas". I for the life of me can't figure out how she could nail us down based on how we spoke. We must have swore once or twice.
How are you figuring that you're in the south once you leave Kansas City? Are you calling St. Louis, Columbia, Jefferson City, pretty much everywhere north, south, east, and west of kansas city, southern? If you are, you're making an incredibly inaccurate assumption. As far as your encounter at Lake of the Ozarks, first off I am currently near there as part of my job right now, and can tell you for a fact that I have been here for 2 months and have yet to hear anyone say "y'all." They might say "you all", or say "ya all", but not "y'all." And second off, the Lake of the Ozarks is not that far north of the northernmost boundary of southern dialect established by linguists at the University of Pennsylvania, and the Southern Midwest has two dialects...South Midland, which covers roughly Eastern Colorado, all of Kansas, 3/4 of Missouri, 2/4 of Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio, and has 75% in common with Southern dialect...and there there is Southern dialect, which covers roughly 1/4 of Missouri, and 1/4 of the southern portions of Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio.

Essentially what I'm trying to say is, if you are going to call Missouri southern, you have to be willing to call over half of Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio southern as well, in addition to all of kansas. And I can guarantee you that more than a few people would have a huge problem with that. The Midwest is laid out like this...there's the Upper Midwest, which features a General American dialect with Canadian overtones (and occasionally can't be told apart from Canadian accents)..then there's the Central Midwest, which features a General American accent. Then there is the Lower Midwest, which features General American dialect with Southern overtones, and also features accents that can sound similar or identical to southern accents. Ultimately however, all three of these areas are more bonded to each other than to any other region. Hence why the Midwest is so diverse and made up of the 12 states that make it up.

Last edited by stlouisan; 02-20-2013 at 03:14 PM..
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Old 02-20-2013, 02:14 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,068,055 times
Reputation: 993
Quote:
Originally Posted by RonnieJonez View Post
ElleTea is right, a lot of Missouri does have a southern accent. They pronounce it Missouruh for a reason.

Even when you cross I-35 into Missouri you'll hear it at a gas station, mcdonalds, etc. You do find it in southern Iowa as well, but not quite to the same extent.

I've noticed once you get into the actual larger cities some people have it and some don't. I used to travel to Kansas City/St Louis a lot and would notice it in both. Even the major cities that are actually in the south (Dallas, Houston, Atlanta) not everyone who is from there has the southern accent, but a lot do, probably the majority of natives to an extent.
St. louis and kansas arent southern ronnie. Southern accents are extremely rare. The line drawn by professional linguists at the university of pennsylvania shows most of missouri to lie in the south midland region. The accent heard in missouri covers two thirds of illinois, indiana and ohio as well as all of kansas even eastern colorado. You never cease to amaze me with your inaccuracy.
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Old 02-20-2013, 02:57 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,068,055 times
Reputation: 993
Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
St. louis and kansas arent southern ronnie. Southern accents are extremely rare. The line drawn by professional linguists at the university of pennsylvania shows most of missouri to lie in the south midland region. The accent heard in missouri covers two thirds of illinois, indiana and ohio as well as all of kansas even eastern colorado. You never cease to amaze me with your inaccuracy.
To add to that, South Midland has 75% in common with Southern accents according to the linguists. So while it may be a lot like a southern accent, it's not a southern accent. And calling it one would require us to call all of Kansas and 2/3 of Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio the south, especially according to jp's definition.
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Old 02-20-2013, 05:24 PM
 
1,911 posts, read 3,146,885 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
St. louis and kansas arent southern ronnie. Southern accents are extremely rare. The line drawn by professional linguists at the university of pennsylvania shows most of missouri to lie in the south midland region. The accent heard in missouri covers two thirds of illinois, indiana and ohio as well as all of kansas even eastern colorado. You never cease to amaze me with your inaccuracy.
You might also want to clarify that St. Louis is a city and Kansas is a state.

Typical steadfast denial of the obvious.

Anyone who has spent any time in Missouruh can tell you that you can pick up on a southern accent, some call it a "twang".

It's a dumb argument, because linguists don't classify it as being a true Southern accent, although it sounds Southern, therefore, it isn't really Southern, and it only sounds Southern while not being truly Southern, because it only has 75% in common, lol.

Generally, if you're close to a Waffle House, except to hear Southern accents. No shortage of those in Missouruh.

Last edited by tollfree; 02-20-2013 at 05:33 PM..
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Old 02-20-2013, 05:35 PM
 
Location: Sioux Falls, SD area
2,956 posts, read 4,376,353 times
Reputation: 4896
Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
How are you figuring that you're in the south once you leave Kansas City? Are you calling St. Louis, Columbia, Jefferson City, pretty much everywhere north, south, east, and west of kansas city, southern? If you are, you're making an incredibly inaccurate assumption. As far as your encounter at Lake of the Ozarks, first off I am currently near there as part of my job right now, and can tell you for a fact that I have been here for 2 months and have yet to hear anyone say "y'all." They might say "you all", or say "ya all", but not "y'all." And second off, the Lake of the Ozarks is not that far north of the northernmost boundary of southern dialect established by linguists at the University of Pennsylvania, and the Southern Midwest has two dialects...South Midland, which covers roughly Eastern Colorado, all of Kansas, 3/4 of Missouri, 2/4 of Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio, and has 75% in common with Southern dialect...and there there is Southern dialect, which covers roughly 1/4 of Missouri, and 1/4 of the southern portions of Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio.

Essentially what I'm trying to say is, if you are going to call Missouri southern, you have to be willing to call over half of Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio southern as well, in addition to all of kansas. And I can guarantee you that more than a few people would have a huge problem with that. The Midwest is laid out like this...there's the Upper Midwest, which features a General American dialect with Canadian overtones (and occasionally can't be told apart from Canadian accents)..then there's the Central Midwest, which features a General American accent. Then there is the Lower Midwest, which features General American dialect with Southern overtones, and also features accents that can sound similar or identical to southern accents. Ultimately however, all three of these areas are more bonded to each other than to any other region. Hence why the Midwest is so diverse and made up of the 12 states that make it up.
Hey, don't get all anal on me. She may have said "you all" or "ya all". I don't know, don't care, and don't remember since it wasn't all that big of deal (until now).

I also don't give a rat's behind about the boundaries drawn by some "expert" university linguist. What I DO know is what I've experienced the many times that we've been to the Kansas City area and the areas around the city. One of my best friends lives there and I love traveling down there to watch my Minnesota Twins (or occasionally the Vikings) play at the Harry S. Truman Complex. You can't beat the tailgating there. I like the Kansas City area.

My son lived in Shenandoah Iowa for several years. It is located only 10 miles from the Missouri border. A southern dialect is everywhere in this area despite what your university expert says.

Incidentally, if my history is correct, wasn't Missouri fighting for the south in the Civil War?
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