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Old 01-13-2014, 02:32 PM
 
Location: Jonesboro
3,177 posts, read 3,046,657 times
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Wait a minute there with that math Golf ^^.. Is that an example of the "newest" math they teach north of the state line? LOL!
If you aded up all of your numbers there, Minnesota would have way more population than it does, given that you are giving M/SP 700,00+3.5 million in the suburbs=4.2 million & saying that the remainder of Minnesota has more people than does all of Iowa.
The new 2013 estimates from the Census Bureau put Minnesota at 5.4 million & Iowa at 3.1 million so some of your figuring is way off.
Outside of the Twin Cities, there is no metro in Minnesota that is "comparable" (your word) to metro Des Moines in size (589,000 in 2012) or importance & if Cedar Rapids were in Minnesota, it would easily be the 3rd largest city in the state & if Davenport were in Minesota it would trail only Mpls, St. Paul & Rochester. All together the Davenport-centered Quad Cities metro population is 383,000. I only mention the combined Ia/Il. population total since you mentioned the Mn/N.D. shared Fargo/Moorhead area.
I've not even mentioned Sioux City, Waterloo-Cedar Falls, the Iowa portion of metro Omaha/Council Bluffs, Ames ,Iowa City or the 20 other or so cities that are larger than places like Marshall, Willmar & Bemidji.
So, the bottom line is that if metro Mpls/St. Paul were removed from the equation for Minnesota, the state would be about the equivalent size of New Mexico or West Virginia or about 900,000smaller than Iowa.
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Old 01-13-2014, 03:49 PM
 
20,793 posts, read 52,493,680 times
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There are 2+ million people living in outstate MN--and 3 million in all of Iowa.....again, Iowa has 3 million total people and the Twin Cities alone has 3.5 million....

Where exactly are all of these "populated" areas in Iowa...so take out Des Moines, Cedar Rapids and whatever else and Iowa is the size of...Minneapolis?
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Old 01-13-2014, 04:03 PM
 
Location: Calera, AL
1,070 posts, read 1,311,070 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by golfgal View Post
I disagree given that the non-metro population in MN is just about the same as the population in the entire state of Iowa...Mankato, Rochester, St. Cloud, Duluth and the Fargo-Moorhead areas are all comparable to the "metros" in Iowa..then add in the smaller centers like Marshall, Willmar, Bemidji, Brainerd, etc. and you have more people than the entire state of Iowa...THEN add in The 700,000 that live in Minnneaolis and St. Paul and the 3.5 million in the suburbs .
MSP metro counties in Minnesota:

Hennepin - 1.15M
Ramsey - 500K
Dakota - 400K
Anoka - 330K
Washington -240K
Stearns -150K
Scott - 130K
Wright - 130K
Carver - 90K
Sherburne - 90K
Rice - 60K
Chisago - 50K
Goodhue - 45K
Isanti - 40K
McLeod - 40K

5.4 million minus all those is right around 2 million, so that is actually quite a bit less than Iowa's approximate population of 3 million.

To re-iterate, outside of MSP, Iowa has more small-to-medium metros.

DSM, Cedar Rapids, Davenport/Quad Cities (the IA portion makes up approximately 50% of the metro, unlike the Moorhead side of Fargo which is something like 30%), Waterloo, Iowa City, Sioux City, Dubuque and Ames all are at the very least comparable to Duluth and Rochester, and blow Brainerd and Marshall out of the water.
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Old 01-13-2014, 08:14 PM
 
Location: Jonesboro
3,177 posts, read 3,046,657 times
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Golf
I'm not sure of what your meaning is in the last sentence there @5:49. My intent here has been just to correct some errors that were written earlier.
We all know that the 5.4 million in Minnesota is a larger population than the 3.1 million in Iowa and that Minnesota continues to grow faster than Iowa.
List of U.S. states by population growth rate - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
And we know that once the Twin cities population is subtracted out of the Minnesota total, it leaves a state with a substantially smaller population than that of Iowa.
List of Metropolitan Statistical Areas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Furthermore, as the 2nd link here shows, metro Des Moines easily outperformed the Twin Cities in percentage growth during the 2000-2010 decade by a margin of 18.3% to 10.5%.
Frankly, considering the huge size of the Twin Cities population & the fact that Minnesota has been growing faster as a state for several decades & that it's square mileage area is 86,000 square miles as opposed to Iowa's noticeably smaller 56,000 square miles, I have been amazed that Minnesota isn't at least 2 or 3 times the size of Iowa in population. But, it's not.
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Old 01-13-2014, 09:26 PM
 
Location: Calera, AL
1,070 posts, read 1,311,070 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by atler8 View Post
Golf
I'm not sure of what your meaning is in the last sentence there @5:49. My intent here has been just to correct some errors that were written earlier.
We all know that the 5.4 million in Minnesota is a larger population than the 3.1 million in Iowa and that Minnesota continues to grow faster than Iowa.
List of U.S. states by population growth rate - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
And we know that once the Twin cities population is subtracted out of the Minnesota total, it leaves a state with a substantially smaller population than that of Iowa.
List of Metropolitan Statistical Areas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Furthermore, as the 2nd link here shows, metro Des Moines easily outperformed the Twin Cities in percentage growth during the 2000-2010 decade by a margin of 18.3% to 10.5%.
Frankly, considering the huge size of the Twin Cities population & the fact that Minnesota has been growing faster as a state for several decades & that it's square mileage area is 86,000 square miles as opposed to Iowa's noticeably smaller 56,000 square miles, I have been amazed that Minnesota isn't at least 2 or 3 times the size of Iowa in population. But, it's not.
Interestingly, Minnesota has been the 27th fastest growing state since 2010, and Iowa has been the 30th. I don't know how long it's been since the gap has been that close. Iowa has virtually no chance of catching up to MN population-wise anytime soon, but at the very least it's nowhere near the bottom of the growth chart as it has been for the better part of the past 50-odd years.
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Old 01-13-2014, 09:37 PM
 
445 posts, read 1,898,086 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fezzador View Post
MSP metro counties in Minnesota:

Hennepin - 1.15M
Ramsey - 500K
Dakota - 400K
Anoka - 330K
Washington -240K
Stearns -150K
Scott - 130K
Wright - 130K
Carver - 90K
Sherburne - 90K
Rice - 60K
Chisago - 50K
Goodhue - 45K
Isanti - 40K
McLeod - 40K
An aside to all this...A few select cities clearly get an almost ridiculous definition of their metropolitan statistical area and Minneapolis is certainly one of them. For example, Hutchinson, which is really the only city in McLeod County is easily 40 miles from the contiguous suburban development of the western suburbs of Minneapolis. Similarly, there are 30 or 40 miles of cornfields between St. Cloud in Stearns County and the northwestern Minneapolis Suburbs.

Compare to Denver, for example, which has about 8 miles between its northern suburban areas and Boulder. Yet Boulder is not included in its MSA. 30 miles from Brighton to Greely in Weld County, yet Weld county is not considered in Denver's MSA. I also estimate there is not even 40 miles between the suburban areas of Colorado Springs and Denver any longer. Yet Colorado Springs is no part of the Denver MSA. In Des Moines, the contiguous development of Ankeny is 12 miles from the contiguous development in Ames, yet Story County is not included in the Des Moines MSA. I know the commuting patterns theory of how MSA's are defined, but there is clearly some behind the scenes politikin' that plays into it as well.
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Old 01-14-2014, 12:00 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis
1,704 posts, read 2,637,235 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pepe1 View Post
An aside to all this...A few select cities clearly get an almost ridiculous definition of their metropolitan statistical area and Minneapolis is certainly one of them. For example, Hutchinson, which is really the only city in McLeod County is easily 40 miles from the contiguous suburban development of the western suburbs of Minneapolis. Similarly, there are 30 or 40 miles of cornfields between St. Cloud in Stearns County and the northwestern Minneapolis Suburbs.

Compare to Denver, for example, which has about 8 miles between its northern suburban areas and Boulder. Yet Boulder is not included in its MSA. 30 miles from Brighton to Greely in Weld County, yet Weld county is not considered in Denver's MSA. I also estimate there is not even 40 miles between the suburban areas of Colorado Springs and Denver any longer. Yet Colorado Springs is no part of the Denver MSA. In Des Moines, the contiguous development of Ankeny is 12 miles from the contiguous development in Ames, yet Story County is not included in the Des Moines MSA. I know the commuting patterns theory of how MSA's are defined, but there is clearly some behind the scenes politikin' that plays into it as well.
Story County isn't included in the Des Moines MSA because it's part of the Ames MSA. Stearns County is part of the St. Cloud MSA, not the Minneapolis MSA. Des Moines and Ames AND St. Cloud and Minneapolis are both CSAs, though.
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Old 01-14-2014, 10:13 AM
 
Location: Des Moines, Iowa
2,401 posts, read 3,551,320 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pepe1 View Post
An aside to all this...A few select cities clearly get an almost ridiculous definition of their metropolitan statistical area and Minneapolis is certainly one of them. For example, Hutchinson, which is really the only city in McLeod County is easily 40 miles from the contiguous suburban development of the western suburbs of Minneapolis. Similarly, there are 30 or 40 miles of cornfields between St. Cloud in Stearns County and the northwestern Minneapolis Suburbs.

Compare to Denver, for example, which has about 8 miles between its northern suburban areas and Boulder. Yet Boulder is not included in its MSA. 30 miles from Brighton to Greely in Weld County, yet Weld county is not considered in Denver's MSA. I also estimate there is not even 40 miles between the suburban areas of Colorado Springs and Denver any longer. Yet Colorado Springs is no part of the Denver MSA. In Des Moines, the contiguous development of Ankeny is 12 miles from the contiguous development in Ames, yet Story County is not included in the Des Moines MSA. I know the commuting patterns theory of how MSA's are defined, but there is clearly some behind the scenes politikin' that plays into it as well.
I don't believe there is any poltics involved in determining which cities do or do not fall into a particular MSA. From my understanding, it all has to do with a study of economic influence (i.e....where people live vs where they work/spend their $$). If interested, I'm sure you could get a clear idea if you dig into the US Office of Mgmt & Budget link below. I'm not motivated enough to do that deep a dive but maybe someone else is...

Quote:
In the United States a metropolitan statistical area (MSA) is a geographical region with a relatively high population density at its core and close economic ties throughout the area. MSAs are defined by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and used by the U.S. Census Bureau and other federal government agencies for statistical purposes.[1]
Metropolitan statistical area - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 01-15-2014, 08:22 AM
 
178 posts, read 267,263 times
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If you're more into professional sports and concerts, you will have a lot more in MSP; Iowa focuses more on college athletics. If that isn't a concern I would go with Iowa; the winter will be much more bearable. The Twin Cities will be 6-8 degrees colder in January, and you'll have an extra 16 inches of snow to move. Unemployment in both states is under 5% which is excellent.
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Old 01-15-2014, 02:20 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis
2,533 posts, read 2,390,381 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pepe1 View Post
An aside to all this...A few select cities clearly get an almost ridiculous definition of their metropolitan statistical area and Minneapolis is certainly one of them. For example, Hutchinson, which is really the only city in McLeod County is easily 40 miles from the contiguous suburban development of the western suburbs of Minneapolis. Similarly, there are 30 or 40 miles of cornfields between St. Cloud in Stearns County and the northwestern Minneapolis Suburbs.

Compare to Denver, for example, which has about 8 miles between its northern suburban areas and Boulder. Yet Boulder is not included in its MSA. 30 miles from Brighton to Greely in Weld County, yet Weld county is not considered in Denver's MSA. I also estimate there is not even 40 miles between the suburban areas of Colorado Springs and Denver any longer. Yet Colorado Springs is no part of the Denver MSA. In Des Moines, the contiguous development of Ankeny is 12 miles from the contiguous development in Ames, yet Story County is not included in the Des Moines MSA. I know the commuting patterns theory of how MSA's are defined, but there is clearly some behind the scenes politikin' that plays into it as well.
Neither St Cloud nor Hutchinson is in the Minneapolis MSA. St Cloud anchors its own MSA, while Hutchinson is the primary city in its own micropolitan statistical area. both are part of The Minneapolis CSA. It's not at all unusual for CSAs to have large patches of undeveloped area. Boulder is a part of Denver's CSA

The OMB defines Metropolitan Statistical Areas based upon pure mathematics in regards to commuting patterns. When 25% percent of a county commutes to a core county within a metro area, that county is deemed to have become economically and social integrated into the metro area.
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