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Old 04-16-2016, 09:06 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
North Dakota also has many coal power plants (many fueled with lignite coal mined there), which is ironic considering the state could easily be nearly completely powered by wind at this point given transmission line upgrades and price drops of wind energy installations.

Existing U.S. Coal Plants - SourceWatch
Another factor to consider is population. North Dakota doesn't have that many people to supply electricity to. North Dakota is even more windy than Iowa. Granted, North Dakota is bigger than Iowa, and there is a longer distance of transmission. However, it could work.

Iowa is on its way. As mentioned in the video, Iowa is somewhat small compared to the other Midwestern states, so transmission of wind power is easier. Not as far, and there are plenty of places in Iowa to put wind farms. Here is a better link to the video, particularly in western IA.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IbY3IP9ObEI
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Old 04-16-2016, 09:14 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
That is mostly because Iowa has a very pragmatic state government that often takes the long-sighted approach, with more success than the southern neighbors. Minnesota has taken a very similar approach to Iowa on the energy source front, staying ahead of the curve and diversifying the mixture- going with more renewable sources on a total percentage basis.
This is owed to Iowa(and Minnesota's) moralistic political culture. Jingoism is not a factor for these states. In Georgia, however, jingoism is a big part of things.

Georgia doesn't have many places to put wind farms. Not many windy places, except in the mountains. Now those areas could use the jobs that come with putting wind farms in the mountainous areas.
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Old 04-17-2016, 09:50 AM
 
Location: Minnysoda
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LOL Moralistic culture!!! ou think a bunch of dirt farmers are doing anything for the "moralistic" culture? bhahahaahah It's about money pure and simple. Study the companies putting in Iowa wind or buying the power from them.. Only about 40% of Mid American Wind power stays in Iowa, Florida Power has huge PPA's in Iowa wind( can't afford to ruin the Fla coastline) as does MEG (Madison Gas and Electric). EXcell's wind power is directly to agreements in place to keep their Nuke and Coal plants on line. Money and politics pure and simple...
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Old 04-17-2016, 09:56 AM
 
Location: Sioux Falls, SD area
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I have no issues with wind farms, though I wouldn't want a collection of these turbines creating a visual blight on my own land. It's definitely a cleaner source of energy than coal and immensely safer than nuclear.


I keep hearing about how we have to practically blanket the countryside with wind turbines to equal 1 coal power plant. In the race to obliterate (and bankrupt) coal, are we leaving our country horribly vulnerable to potential energy crisis'?


I'm curious about the comparison of the two as to efficiency (megawatts created) versus coal and it's real or imagined (I'm not debating that issue and have no dog in that hunt) environmental issues.


I have some knowledge of this as there was a proposed wind farm that was going to be built where our family farm is located. The company was going to pay the farmer $ 3500 per megawatt. The turbines would be either 1 1/2 or 2 megawatts each. They were also stating there would be one turbine on approx. every 40 acres. When driving I-80 west of Des Moines, those turbines are a lot closer than that.


Each turbine would take out of production approx. 1 acre. What was never really established is when these turbines are taken out of use or if the company goes under, who was responsible to take these things down? No precedent was established under this and needless to say this was a concern and the company we were dealing with at the time was intentionally vague.


The proposed wind farm never happened since the company couldn't establish a source to buy the power generated that met their investment. I don't know of any other reasons. I'm glad it folded although an extra $ 20K to $ 30K paycheck per year would have been nice on our quarter section.
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Old 04-17-2016, 02:26 PM
 
Location: Minnysoda
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^^^^^^^^^^^Modern farming practices are adversely effected by wind tower placement. Not only does the tower itself take up space, access roads cut across what in the past was one field. No longer can you simply program the combine to follow gps coordinates from one end of the field to the other. Now you have to allow for wind farm infrastructure. It does effect bottom line....
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Old 04-17-2016, 04:18 PM
 
Location: IN
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Energy efficiency needs to be mentioned more frequently. Where is all of this electricity demand growth coming from and can it be geographically mapped? Since loss of generated electricity through transmission at longer distances is extreme, exporting electricity long distances is not very cost effective nor profitable. Yes, many coal plants will be retiring in the next 5-10 years as the majority of those were over 60 years old, operating well beyond their intended lifespan, often completely lacking modern emission controls.
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Old 04-17-2016, 05:20 PM
 
44,564 posts, read 43,091,728 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Energy efficiency needs to be mentioned more frequently. Where is all of this electricity demand growth coming from and can it be geographically mapped? Since loss of generated electricity through transmission at longer distances is extreme, exporting electricity long distances is not very cost effective nor profitable. Yes, many coal plants will be retiring in the next 5-10 years as the majority of those were over 60 years old, operating well beyond their intended lifespan, often completely lacking modern emission controls.
It could be mapped. It would take some work, mainly with tracking that transmission. And the video I posted mentions distance of sending energy. It is something important to consider.

And the coal plants would certainly need to be modernized. That is another geography lesson altogether. Where are they?
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Old 04-17-2016, 07:20 PM
 
Location: IN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by green_mariner View Post
It could be mapped. It would take some work, mainly with tracking that transmission. And the video I posted mentions distance of sending energy. It is something important to consider.

And the coal plants would certainly need to be modernized. That is another geography lesson altogether. Where are they?
They are mapped right here, click on the state and it lists all plants, MW output, initial year of operation (per unit) whether they are active or not, and if they are planned to be retired.

Existing U.S. Coal Plants - SourceWatch
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Old 04-18-2016, 08:12 AM
 
Location: Sioux Falls, SD area
2,955 posts, read 4,371,041 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
They are mapped right here, click on the state and it lists all plants, MW output, initial year of operation (per unit) whether they are active or not, and if they are planned to be retired.

Existing U.S. Coal Plants - SourceWatch

I looked up the coal power plant in Council Bluffs that I drive by all the time. It states that this one plant generates 1778.9 megawatts of power. Using the megawatt/turbine size that was proposed on the failed wind farm project by our farm of 1 1/2 to 2 megawatts each you'll need at the bare minimum just under 900 to over 1100 wind turbines to match the output.


Owner/Parent Company: MidAmerican Energy (owned by Berkshire Hathaway)
Plant Nameplate Capacity: 856 MW (Megawatts), 1778.9 MW (2008)
Units and In-Service Dates: 49 MW (1954), 82 MW (1958), 726 MW (1978), 922.5 MW (2007)[SIZE=2][4][/SIZE]
Location: 2115 Navajo, Council Bluffs, IA 51501


My son told me most of the power from this plant by Omaha actually goes to Chicago. Purely here-say, but interesting.


I may be misreading these figures, but if not it's some ridiculous numbers.


Wind power is a good, safe power source. If these numbers are accurate, it's going to fall dramatically short in what we'll need.


I noticed that Iowa is building a new hydroelectric dam by the existing dam for Red Rock Lake (Des Moines River) south of Des Moines. Seems odd that they didn't do this when they originally dammed the river way back when. This will be a great new source for clean power in the area.


I've never really thought much about the comparing energy sources before this thread. It's interesting.

Last edited by jmgg; 04-18-2016 at 08:26 AM..
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Old 04-18-2016, 11:54 AM
 
Location: Minnysoda
8,015 posts, read 8,078,833 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jmgg View Post
I looked up the coal power plant in Council Bluffs that I drive by all the time. It states that this one plant generates 1778.9 megawatts of power. Using the megawatt/turbine size that was proposed on the failed wind farm project by our farm of 1 1/2 to 2 megawatts each you'll need at the bare minimum just under 900 to over 1100 wind turbines to match the output.


Owner/Parent Company: MidAmerican Energy (owned by Berkshire Hathaway)
Plant Nameplate Capacity: 856 MW (Megawatts), 1778.9 MW (2008)
Units and In-Service Dates: 49 MW (1954), 82 MW (1958), 726 MW (1978), 922.5 MW (2007)[SIZE=2][4][/SIZE]
Location: 2115 Navajo, Council Bluffs, IA 51501


My son told me most of the power from this plant by Omaha actually goes to Chicago. Purely here-say, but interesting.


I may be misreading these figures, but if not it's some ridiculous numbers.


Wind power is a good, safe power source. If these numbers are accurate, it's going to fall dramatically short in what we'll need.


I noticed that Iowa is building a new hydroelectric dam by the existing dam for Red Rock Lake (Des Moines River) south of Des Moines. Seems odd that they didn't do this when they originally dammed the river way back when. This will be a great new source for clean power in the area.


I've never really thought much about the comparing energy sources before this thread. It's interesting.
Here's a question for you calculate
How many wind turbines would you need to install in order to cover then availability factor and then the capacity factor to equal that of a 1.7 gig coal plant...
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