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Old 06-25-2018, 11:35 AM
 
22 posts, read 19,425 times
Reputation: 23

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Quote:
Originally Posted by paleopanda View Post
Iím looking at a job in Iowa City so this thread on taxes caught my eye as I am from out of state.
Iíve done a little research on real estate in that particular
area of Iowa and what Iíve found doesnít seem to align with many of the
comments here. Specifically, the highest rated public high school around
Iowa City I found was in Solon and it was only a 6.
I know Great Schools is not the final arbiter on which schools provide the best education
but I have to assume their evaluations are at least fairly accurate.

GreatSchools now puts more weight on equity factors - Iowa City schools are weak in this area. They're doing things to try to improve. But those performance gaps brings their GreatSchools scores down for the high schools. (The elementaries are less diverse in general, so you have a wider range of scores.)
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Old 07-23-2018, 12:18 AM
FBF
 
563 posts, read 645,269 times
Reputation: 473
I have to chuckle....you consider those tax rates high?....oh America!

If anything, I am piss3d that they are not slightly higher to subside tuition for colleges in this state (they increased it again despite reduce funding). And they should raise the minimum wage.

Last edited by FBF; 07-23-2018 at 12:38 AM..
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Old 07-24-2018, 03:37 PM
 
195 posts, read 147,702 times
Reputation: 424
Quote:
Originally Posted by FBF View Post
I have to chuckle....you consider those tax rates high?....oh America!

If anything, I am piss3d that they are not slightly higher to subside tuition for colleges in this state (they increased it again despite reduce funding). And they should raise the minimum wage.
Taxes were cut for big business in Iowa. They have to make up the difference somewhere.
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Old 07-27-2018, 03:20 PM
 
Location: Connecticut
24,684 posts, read 40,267,999 times
Reputation: 6999
Quote:
Originally Posted by InchingWest View Post
Out of all the states in the US I think I would enjoy Iowa's 4-season climate the best. Jobs seems to be solid, stable, and middle class. The people in Iowa are known for their friendliness and hospitality.

But....how do you justify having higher income taxes than even states like Maryland, Illinois, New York or New Jersey!?
Iowa
0.36%$0
0.72%>$1,598
2.43%>$3,196
4.50%>$6,392
6.12%>$14,382
6.48%>$23,970
6.80%>$31,960
7.92%>$47,940
8.98%>$71,910

So take a guy like me who makes about $55k per year and will probably make closer to $60k this year and likely over that next year. You mean to tell me that I'm paying nearly 8% for my top rate?

Now I understand that would only be the highest bracket, but because that would only be the highest ľ or so of my income the average would bump down a bit, but still I would find myself paying in the 6Ĺ percent range overall.

And I hear that property taxes in Iowa aren't something to balk at either. Looking on Zillow (perhaps not the best source, but they seem to be consistant) it seems that you average home in Des Moines has about a 5k property tax bill, but even here in Maryland similar homes would only have to pay 2-2.5k depending on county.

Here's a reasonable example: https://www.zillow.com/homes/for_sal...33_rect/10_zm/
255k asking price, but it's "only" assessed at 200k (I'm assessed somewhat lower than market value where I am too)....with an annual property tax bill of 4.7k. Ouch!!!

Where does it all go? And why does the beautiful midwest tax so much? If I want to move out to the midwest why wouldn't I just skip on over to Sioux Falls even though places like Des Moines, or Omaha in Nebraska seem like great options other than for the taxes?
Those income tax rates are high. I am shocked. I thought Connecticut was supposed to be bad but our maximum rate is 6.5% but that is for people making over $200,000 per year. Yours would be 5.5%. As to the property taxes, they are high on the home you posted. A similar priced home in suburban Hartford would be about the same or even a little higher taxes depending on the town plus we have the dreaded car tax which can be a couple of hundred a year more. The good thing though is we do not have counties here. Just the towns and the state. We are such a small state we do not need that extra layer of government. The state assumes all the duties that the counties do in other states so that is why when comparisons of state tax burdens are made, Connecticut always comes out near the top. We do not have a county level of government to push those duties and the taxes they require on down too. Each town provides their own school district with a few small ones pooling together to form small regional school districts. That is expensive but Connecticut has some of the best public schools in the country. As my father always said "You get what you pay for." Jay
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Old 07-27-2018, 10:43 PM
 
Location: Sioux Falls, SD area
2,958 posts, read 4,388,355 times
Reputation: 4896
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayCT View Post
Those income tax rates are high. I am shocked. I thought Connecticut was supposed to be bad but our maximum rate is 6.5% but that is for people making over $200,000 per year. Yours would be 5.5%. As to the property taxes, they are high on the home you posted. A similar priced home in suburban Hartford would be about the same or even a little higher taxes depending on the town plus we have the dreaded car tax which can be a couple of hundred a year more. The good thing though is we do not have counties here. Just the towns and the state. We are such a small state we do not need that extra layer of government. The state assumes all the duties that the counties do in other states so that is why when comparisons of state tax burdens are made, Connecticut always comes out near the top. We do not have a county level of government to push those duties and the taxes they require on down too. Each town provides their own school district with a few small ones pooling together to form small regional school districts. That is expensive but Connecticut has some of the best public schools in the country. As my father always said "You get what you pay for." Jay

Yep, Connecticut is the home of the most brilliant politicians in the country. The place to live as long as the federal government can be enticed to bale their ass out.


https://www.thedailybeast.com/why-co...-is-collapsing


States with the largest debt ratio to income look awfully blue.



Last edited by jmgg; 07-27-2018 at 10:55 PM..
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Old 07-28-2018, 04:59 PM
 
Location: Connecticut
24,684 posts, read 40,267,999 times
Reputation: 6999
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmgg View Post
Yep, Connecticut is the home of the most brilliant politicians in the country. The place to live as long as the federal government can be enticed to bale their ass out.


https://www.thedailybeast.com/why-co...-is-collapsing


States with the largest debt ratio to income look awfully blue.

I am not sure why you think Connecticut needs the federal government to bail it out. Yes the state has a lot of debt but that is mostly because the state takes on the debt that other states assign to a county. Also note the state and its cities have made great strides to rein in its debt. Plus the state is very affluent and despite what the conservative media likes to say, the number of people earning more than $100,000 is increasing. It is not nearly as bleak as that article portraits but that would not attract readers. Jay
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Old 08-01-2018, 08:26 PM
 
210 posts, read 215,068 times
Reputation: 187
Honestly, wherever you go in the upper Midwest it's going to be hard to avoid taxes. You think Iowa is bad? Go take a look at property taxes in IL! Minnesota also has one of the highest tax burdens in the country.

South Dakota and Missouri are the only tax friendly states bordering IA, so if low taxes and an Iowa type of lifestyle is what you are looking for than Sioux Falls or KC metro (both KS and MO side) might be a good place to look.

In the grand scheme of things though........Iowa is pretty much middle of the pack when it comes to taxes and pretty much everything else too which is why it rates so highly as a good place to live.
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Old 08-01-2018, 08:38 PM
 
210 posts, read 215,068 times
Reputation: 187
Quote:
Originally Posted by paleopanda View Post
I’m looking at a job in Iowa City so this thread on taxes caught my eye as I am from out of state.
I’ve done a little research on real estate in that particular
area of Iowa and what I’ve found doesn’t seem to align with many of the
comments here. Specifically, the highest rated public high school around
Iowa City I found was in Solon and it was only a 6.
I know Great Schools is not the final arbiter on which schools provide the best education
but I have to assume their evaluations are at least fairly accurate.
There are great schools in Des Moines, Iowa City.....even Cedar Rapids metro and the Quads have some good ones. There also some rural communities such as Decorah, Orange City and Waverly that have strong schools too. The quality of education is not really the issue.

Iowa's problem is that we don't have enough students attending college despite our higher than average school performance and graduation rates, but an involved parent that fosters a competitive spirit in their kids can avoid this.

Last edited by Juice Malone; 08-01-2018 at 08:50 PM..
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Old 08-02-2018, 05:57 PM
 
Location: Iowa
6 posts, read 3,299 times
Reputation: 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by scimitar12 View Post
The roads are way better in VA than Iowa.
The average winter temperatures in Virginia are above freezing. The average winter temperatures in Iowa are below freezing. The freezing and thawing makes a huge difference on the quality of roads.
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Old 08-03-2018, 08:20 PM
 
195 posts, read 147,702 times
Reputation: 424
Quote:
Originally Posted by lthenderson View Post
The average winter temperatures in Virginia are above freezing. The average winter temperatures in Iowa are below freezing. The freezing and thawing makes a huge difference on the quality of roads.
My goal is to move somewhere they've never heard of "frost heaving".
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