U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Iowa
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-21-2020, 02:44 PM
 
Location: Calera, AL
1,282 posts, read 1,627,826 times
Reputation: 1855

Advertisements

With the massive damage caused by the derecho less than 2 weeks ago, is it perhaps time for the state to (at least somewhat) de-emphasize agriculture and consider focusing on the technology and manufacturing sectors? Iowa gets its share of natural disasters, but I don't think even the damage caused by the floods in the past quarter century came close to the damage caused by the derecho.



Although agriculture is Iowa's lifeblood, I don't think it's seen the same way today as it was a couple of generations ago. I believe California has firmly supplanted Iowa as a top crop and livestock producer and a lot of the corn Iowa produces doesn't go to dinner tables, but rather to ethanol plants to create slightly cheaper fuels.



But with unpredictable weather, and the massive bailouts required due to said unpredictable weather, maybe it's time Iowa considers bringing in more white-collar jobs. The benefits include a higher likelihood of retaining Iowa-educated graduates, attracting talent from other states and even abroad, and if bad weather happens to occur, it's not going to be nearly as devastating as it would be to farmers.


I have left the state 20 years ago, but I still care about what happens there and it's sort of depressing that it used to be a state to be looked up to, but poor leadership is dragging the state's potential down. I also don't have much faith in the state's voters of making any significant changes since Iowans tend to only accept change kicking and screaming.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-22-2020, 06:10 AM
 
4,474 posts, read 3,732,743 times
Reputation: 14844
Ive always thought its a dangerous precedent when turning thousands of acres of farmland into homes or tech and manufacturing. You never get it back.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-22-2020, 08:27 AM
 
Location: Indianapolis, East Side
1,770 posts, read 866,220 times
Reputation: 4361
Quote:
Originally Posted by fezzador View Post
But with unpredictable weather, and the massive bailouts required due to said unpredictable weather, maybe it's time Iowa considers bringing in more white-collar jobs.
Bringing them in how?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-22-2020, 10:06 AM
 
Location: Sioux Falls, SD area
3,791 posts, read 5,134,470 times
Reputation: 6977
Quote:
Originally Posted by fezzador View Post
With the massive damage caused by the derecho less than 2 weeks ago, is it perhaps time for the state to (at least somewhat) de-emphasize agriculture and consider focusing on the technology and manufacturing sectors? Iowa gets its share of natural disasters, but I don't think even the damage caused by the floods in the past quarter century came close to the damage caused by the derecho.



Although agriculture is Iowa's lifeblood, I don't think it's seen the same way today as it was a couple of generations ago. I believe California has firmly supplanted Iowa as a top crop and livestock producer and a lot of the corn Iowa produces doesn't go to dinner tables, but rather to ethanol plants to create slightly cheaper fuels.



But with unpredictable weather, and the massive bailouts required due to said unpredictable weather, maybe it's time Iowa considers bringing in more white-collar jobs. The benefits include a higher likelihood of retaining Iowa-educated graduates, attracting talent from other states and even abroad, and if bad weather happens to occur, it's not going to be nearly as devastating as it would be to farmers.


I have left the state 20 years ago, but I still care about what happens there and it's sort of depressing that it used to be a state to be looked up to, but poor leadership is dragging the state's potential down. I also don't have much faith in the state's voters of making any significant changes since Iowans tend to only accept change kicking and screaming.
How do you ditch agriculture? Quit farming the available land? Don't lessen it's importance by no longer making an effort to compete with other states. The rich soil of Iowa is a huge advantage for the state compared to the rest of the country.

What might need to be done is to maintain the agriculture presence while trying to pursue other business sectors. Iowa is already a leader in the insurance market, work on expanding this since you have that footprint. If it's software development they want to pursue, invest heavily in expanding 5G outside of just a couple major cities. What they might also look at, even though it's AG related, is the development of independent smaller packing houses to compete with the monopolies that exist currently.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-22-2020, 02:03 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
16,559 posts, read 19,420,586 times
Reputation: 34280
Further concentrating America's food production will only result in catastrophe. What happens when California is responsible for 90% of America's food supply and some natural disaster affecting California such as drought, massive fires, locusts, hail, or even terrorism hits the Central Valley?

We could ask for aid from abroad, but it wouldn't come cheap as we have shredded our alliances and alienated allies in the last few years. Are we going to become dependant on Russia for food if something were to affect our food supply?

Don't get me wrong, Iowa, and every state really, would do well to diversify their economies and while I don't think tech is the economic panacea some think, it would be smart to enable people and local economies to let ventures grow. Likewise, states that have let fields go fallow due to the rise of industry 100 years ago would be wise to bring agriculture back up as part of a diverse economic and, really, survival plan.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-22-2020, 03:14 PM
 
555 posts, read 350,066 times
Reputation: 1468
The state does not have to ditch or deemphasize agriculture to also work on embracing manufacturing, technology, and "white collar" work. Especially now. The very premise that pits the two somehow at odds to each other in a state that has both multiple metro areas and extensive farmland is false. Perhaps the one thing it could do would be improve access to broadband / high speed internet as much as possible. But every region of the US that doesn't have this should be intensely pursuing it right now anyway.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-23-2020, 12:04 AM
 
2,041 posts, read 624,338 times
Reputation: 6188
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlessedLife View Post
The state does not have to ditch or deemphasize agriculture to also work on embracing manufacturing, technology, and "white collar" work. Especially now. The very premise that pits the two somehow at odds to each other in a state that has both multiple metro areas and extensive farmland is false. Perhaps the one thing it could do would be improve access to broadband / high speed internet as much as possible. But every region of the US that doesn't have this should be intensely pursuing it right now anyway.
Exactly, the two are not mutually exclusive. Iowa is close to being "perfect" in terms of temperature and precipitation for growing a variety of crops. I hope someone is paying attention to topsoil depletion and its health. Last I looked, people needed to eat much more regularly than they need to do anything else, and losing Iowa would significantly hurt the world's ability to eat.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-27-2020, 12:07 PM
 
Location: Iowa
18 posts, read 13,408 times
Reputation: 84
So what should I do with the 2000 acres I own? Let it grow up and weeds while continuing to pay the taxes? Should I put an advertisement out to tech firms that they can buy my land that isn't near any large city and thus doesn't have an employable population base, has no infrastructure such as water, sewer, electrical, gas, internet, etc.? I live in a nearby regional town that has all those things and they can't attract a tech company though they have spent years and millions of dollars attempting to do so.

Sometimes you have to just work with the cards you were dealt. Iowa has some cities that has all the right necessities to attract technology. Iowa also has millions of acres of prime farm land that is suitable to grow agricultural products. I agree that we can embrace both and not make them mutually exclusive.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-28-2020, 11:16 AM
Status: "I'm cognitively there" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Gilbert, AZ
4,101 posts, read 2,514,920 times
Reputation: 4642
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheerbliss View Post
Bringing them in how?
Yeah. I have some perspective on this, having grown up on a farm in Iowa and receiving a BS in engineering from an Iowa university.

A serious effort to establish a technology economy would take an enormous amount of money, over decades. Sorry, it isn't going to happen. The population of Iowa is massively invested in agriculture, both economically and emotionally. Nothing wrong with that, of course, as it's the best in the U.S. at what it does... raise corn and hogs.

It's true that a lot of corn is used in ethanol production, which in the long run is not going to be a growth industry IMO. But other parts of the country that use groundwater to irrigate cornfields (parts of Nebraska and South Dakota, for example) will ultimately have to change over to activities which can exist on natural rainfall... growing small grains, and turning fields into range land. This will be a plus for the states where corn thrives without irrigation, and Iowa is one of those few states.

Last edited by hikernut; 08-28-2020 at 12:12 PM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-28-2020, 01:14 PM
 
Location: Sioux Falls, SD area
3,791 posts, read 5,134,470 times
Reputation: 6977
Quote:
Originally Posted by hikernut View Post
Yeah. I have some perspective on this, having grown up on a farm in Iowa and receiving a BS in engineering from an Iowa university.

A serious effort to establish a technology economy would take an enormous amount of money, over decades. Sorry, it isn't going to happen. The population of Iowa is massively invested in agriculture, both economically and emotionally. Nothing wrong with that, of course, as it's the best in the U.S. at what it does... raise corn and hogs.

It's true that a lot of corn is used in ethanol production, which in the long run is not going to be a growth industry IMO. But other parts of the country that use groundwater to irrigate cornfields (parts of Nebraska and South Dakota, for example) will ultimately have to change over to activities which can exist on natural rainfall... growing small grains, and turning fields into range land. This will be a plus for the states where corn thrives without irrigation, and Iowa is one of those few states.
Interesting statement on irrigation. Highly irrigated areas may have issues if aquifer depletion grows dramatically. It would be interesting to see how this is balanced throughout the entire U.S. as it's use is in major agricultural states in very arid areas like California as well.

You're right, this irrigation issue would barely affect Iowa at all. Agriculture will always be king in Iowa.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Iowa
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top