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Old 11-04-2014, 07:20 PM
 
116 posts, read 67,377 times
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commonalities between Shia and Sunni
by Tareq Ramadan

Can't We all Get Along? Sunni-Shi'a Commonalities | Informed Comment

Sunni-Shi’a Similarities

"While Muhammad’s death left a power vacuum that fractured the early Muslim community along both political and religious lines and ultimately gave birth to two main, competing ideologies and visions for the maintaining of authority in the Muslim world, today, there is more Sunni-Shi’a agreement about early Islamic history than is acknowledged. For example, Sunnis and Shi’as often tend to collectively regard the leaders of the world’s first Arab-Muslim hereditary dynasty, the Umayyads, as tepid converts to Islam, as early enemies of the Prophet, as illegitimate successors to Muhammad and as immoral, unholy, impious opportunists unworthy of the mantle of Islamic leadership.

Furthermore, both sects also share the same Quran, both believe in the prophethood of Muhammad (as well as all of the other prophets mentioned in the Quran), both view Muhammad as an exemplary model of good behavior who should be emulated by all, both believe in the absolute oneness of God (tawhid), both observe fasting during the holy month of Ramadan, both accept that the pilgrimage (hajj) to the Ka’aba in Mecca is obligatory, both celebrate the two main Muslim holidays of Eid al-Adha (Feast of the Sacrifice) and Eid al-Fitr (Feast of Breaking of the fast), both accept the holiness and sanctity of the cities of Mecca, Medina, and Jerusalem, both pray five times daily and in the same direction (with some slight variations), both believe in the Day of Judgment, the Day of Resurrection, in Angels, Jinn, and the devil, and both adhere to systems of jurisprudence that are highly interconnected and overlap. In fact, some of the leading Sunni Muslim scholars and jurists from the Classical Islamic period (7th-13th centuries CE) such as Malik ibn Anas and Abu Hanifa- two of four jurists who founded Sunni schools of law- were students of the great scholars and Shi’i Imams Muhammad ibn Ali al-Baqir and Ja’far al-Sadiq in 8th century Iraq.

Despite this, the ideological differences (that mostly center on the concepts of succession, leadership and religious authority in the Muslim world) that do exist between both Sunnis and Shi’as have often been used by some to emphasize the seemingly extra-distinct nature of each sect, ignoring commonalities and promoting particular symbols, expressions, views, and lexicons often leading to a sense of increased ‘otherness’ among each one. One such issue oftentimes viewed as almost exclusively Shi’a in terms of religious and historical relevance and importance is the Battle of Karbala which is commemorated during ‘Ashura- the tenth day of the month of Muharram (in the Muslim calendar) which marks the tragic killing of Muhammad’s grandson and political leader Hussein bin Ali (regarded as the third Imam, or religious successor and descendant of Muhammad through his cousin Ali and his wife Fatima, by Shi’i Muslims), by the Umayyad caliph Yazid I and his army in 680 CE in Iraq.

While ‘Ashura has come to take on particularly significant symbolic religious importance for Shi’a Muslims which often involves communal mourning and grieving, elaborate and emotional re-enactments of Hussein’s martyrdom, and sometimes self-flagellation and bloodletting (which is by no means unique to Shi’i Islam), Hussein’s death is still considered a dark and sorrowful episode in the eyes of many Sunnis too. In some communities, Sunnis view the day and the first ten days of Muharram as a time of spiritual self-reflection and is often observed by voluntary fasting. It has been argued that Muhammad (according to some disputed ahadith), himself, fasted for ‘Ashura during his lifetime decades before Hussein’s martyrdom, to commemorate the day God saved Moses from Egypt’s Pharaoh (by parting the Red Sea)as well as the day that Noah’s ark finally cleared the flood. Although not a prominent feature of the Sunni historical narrative, ‘Ashura has, in some cases, become an event used as a platform to engage in Sunni-Shi’i dialogue. For example, in December 2011, Egyptian Sunnis and Shi’as (at Ras al-Hussein in Cairo) commemorated ‘Ashura together while leaders from both sects called on increased unity between each other. Egyptian Sunni scholar Ahmad Sobh even called for an (Imam) Hussein-style uprising against the ‘Yazids’ (Yazid’s name is used as a pejorative term for a bloodthirsty tyrant) of the Arab and Muslim world "
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Old 11-04-2014, 07:52 PM
 
1,727 posts, read 1,082,597 times
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The separation rested entirely on Muhammeds death, leaving no successor, Ali, and Bakr vied for the position.
Bakr got in, also alienating his daughter,Ashia, by taking the land she felt was rightfully hers.
For further info here, a person needs to go into Taburi, not Bukhari, which claims muhammed was broke,

He died a wealthy man, and the squabbles began.

Ashia sided with Ali, apparently having a following of her own, and for the next few generations was a back and forth of murder and mayhem.
There were no religious differences at this point, and it is speculated little religion at all, It was about money, the booty collected from the raids.
The leader gets 20% of the booty taken in..

There was nothing righteous about the 4 righteous calief's, the first 4, and there was nothing documented about them during their lives, with the first documentation coming from Malik's court.
The sunni reject much of Malik's writings, as they do not speak well of muhammed, but were quick to invent their own, 300 years after the fact.
The shia went into India, and the sunni went into Europe, for booty.

1400 years of separation would naturally create differences in the religion.
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Old 11-04-2014, 10:26 PM
 
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Thank you Woodrow.
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Old 02-21-2015, 08:35 PM
 
Location: Texas
115 posts, read 172,695 times
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I have a question for Woodrow.

Muslims believe Mohammed was the final prophet and Quran is the final holy book. But you said that Jesus will return to complete his life. What happens if Jesus brings new divine revelations with him when he returns. Will Muslims reject it or will they accept it.
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Old 02-21-2015, 09:41 PM
 
Location: Logan Township, Minnesota
15,511 posts, read 13,274,304 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Forum Registration View Post
I have a question for Woodrow.

Muslims believe Mohammed was the final prophet and Quran is the final holy book. But you said that Jesus will return to complete his life. What happens if Jesus brings new divine revelations with him when he returns. Will Muslims reject it or will they accept it.

I do not believe there will be any issues. Jesus(a.s.) is not a new Prophet. He came before Muhammad(saaws) and is simply completing his life.
We are told there will be no "NEW" Prophets after Muhammad(saaws) I do not see were that closes the door to the possibility Jesus(a.s.) may revel things that were not revealed before.

But, in my opinion it would be rather pointless as the resurrection of the dead and judgement day will be imminent. Too late to save anyone that will be the final generation of mankind and the world will soon be no more.
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Old 02-22-2015, 10:53 AM
 
Location: Texas
115 posts, read 172,695 times
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So Jesus will return only to see the end of the world right when he gets here? I didn't know Muslims were doomsdayers too.

I thought you had said in another thread that a single caliphate would not be until Jesus returns. For how long would the caliphate last?
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Old 02-22-2015, 01:49 PM
 
Location: Logan Township, Minnesota
15,511 posts, read 13,274,304 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Forum Registration View Post
So Jesus will return only to see the end of the world right when he gets here? I didn't know Muslims were doomsdayers too.

I thought you had said in another thread that a single caliphate would not be until Jesus returns. For how long would the caliphate last?
That is the caliphate I spoke of in the other thread. When Jesus(as) returns. As that will be one of the last signs of judgement day, I believe it will end with the death of Jesus as His next job will be at the resurrection when he will testify against those who worshiped him as a god

Yes we do believe in a last day. We also believe most of the minor signs of it have already occurred and 9 of the 10 Major signs have yet to be filled'
What we believe the 10 major signs are:

• Dajjal — the false Messiah or Anti-Christ,
• Gog and Magog,
• Smoke,
• The beast of the earth or land (most likely the holy land),
• The sun would rise from the west,
• Three sinkings of the earth
• one in the east
• One in the west
• and One in Arabia,
• A fire would come out of Yemen and would drive people to their place of assembly (for judgement),
• The son of Mary would descend. Although these signs were not given by the blessed Prophet (peace and blessings of
Ten Major Signs of the Last Day - Has One Just Occurred

Many scholars I have read believe the "Sun rising from the West " is metaphorical and refering to an era when the world is highly confused and in turmoil. I believe that one is taking place now.
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