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Old 09-30-2014, 07:35 AM
 
Location: Monnem Germany/ from San Diego
2,272 posts, read 2,471,599 times
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Anybody know much about this Turkish religious group? They are related to Sunni Islam but totally different.

I am a devout agnostic ;-) but find from what I read and how my new neighbor,an Alevi woman, explains their beliefs that they have a unique take on religion, emphasizing the inner self and the intent of religion over the rules of religion.

I do think I have a bit of a crush my new neighbor she is rather attractive and totally laid back, friendly and interesting.
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Old 09-30-2014, 08:51 PM
 
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"emphasizing the inner self and the intent of religion over the rules of religion. "
....that sounds Sufi to me.....if so, then IMO, it is not about Sunni/Shia, but Sushi!!!
Sufi are mystical orders/brotherhoods that developed in the 8th century...I find the Mevlevi order interesting...they are also called the whirling dervishes and their founder (I think?) was the Persian poet Rumi. (?) (They are also in Turkey)

"In 2005, UNESCO proclaimed the "The Mevlevi Sema Ceremony" of Turkey as amongst the Masterpieces of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity."---wikipedia
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Old 10-01-2014, 01:16 AM
 
Location: Logan Township, Minnesota
15,511 posts, read 13,302,730 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GER308 View Post
Anybody know much about this Turkish religious group? They are related to Sunni Islam but totally different.

I am a devout agnostic ;-) but find from what I read and how my new neighbor,an Alevi woman, explains their beliefs that they have a unique take on religion, emphasizing the inner self and the intent of religion over the rules of religion.

I do think I have a bit of a crush my new neighbor she is rather attractive and totally laid back, friendly and interesting.
Most are Kurdish, the name roughly means "Devoted to Ali" which indicates a Shi'ite origin They derived from the Syrian Alawaites which is the Arabic name and is a Shi'ite sect originally from Iran

Their practices have little resemblance to either Shi'ite or Sunni and seems to be more like Yazidi. I think because the Kurds have been so abused by Arabs. Iranians and Turks they have evolved their own religion with settlements of Shi'ite, Yazidiz, Christianity, Judaism and Sunni maybe with even a touch of Sufi
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Old 10-02-2014, 01:25 AM
 
Location: Monnem Germany/ from San Diego
2,272 posts, read 2,471,599 times
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Originally Posted by Woodrow LI View Post
Most are Kurdish, the name roughly means "Devoted to Ali" which indicates a Shi'ite origin They derived from the Syrian Alawaites which is the Arabic name and is a Shi'ite sect originally from Iran

Their practices have little resemblance to either Shi'ite or Sunni and seems to be more like Yazidi. I think because the Kurds have been so abused by Arabs. Iranians and Turks they have evolved their own religion with settlements of Shi'ite, Yazidiz, Christianity, Judaism and Sunni maybe with even a touch of Sufi
Thanks Woodrow, and my bad I really ment Shia but Im a bit dyslexic sometimes :-)
anways their beliefs seem quite interesting.

A bit from Wikipedia:

"Alevism or Alevi (/'lɛvij/, also /ˈlɛviː/ or /əˈleɪviː/, Turkish: Alevlik or Turkish: Anadolu Alevliği/Alevileri,also called Qizilbash, Spiritual Shiism or Sufi-Shia by outsiders

"The Alevi spiritual path (yol) is commonly understood to take place through four major life-stages, or "gates". These may be further subdivided into "four gates, forty levels" (Drt Kapı Kırk Makam). The first gate (religious law) is considered elementary (and this may be perceived as subtle criticism of other Muslim traditions).


The following are major crimes that cause an Alevi to be declared dşkn (shunned)
  • killing a person
  • committing adultery
  • divorcing one’s wife
  • stealing
  • backbiting/ gossiping
Most Alevi activity takes place in the context of the second gate (spiritual brotherhood), during which one submits to a living spiritual guide (dede, pir, mrşid). The existence of the third and fourth gates is mostly theoretical, though some older Alevis have apparently received initiation into the third.

"Alevi women[edit]

According to John Shindeldecker "Alevis are proud to point out that they are monogamous, Alevi women worship together with men, Alevi women are free to dress in modern clothing, Alevi women are encouraged to get the best education they can, and Alevi women are free to go into any occupation they choose.
According to Australian anthropologist Dr. Sevgi Kilic, while Alevi women do not experience gender segregation in the private and public domain they are subject to traditional male values about women's sexuality and constructed within the honor/shame paradigm. This ethnography is the first on Alevi women in Turkey and argues that Alevi identity is complex, diverse and rich in its theory and practice.
Hence, while rural Alevi women subscribe to traditional conservative views about women's status in the family, these ideas are rapidly changing within an urban environment, where many are compelled to work as domestic servants and in other low paid jobs. Alevi women are not required to wear a headscarf or other bodily coverings. According to Kilic this is because Alevi identity is very much focused on the internal rather than the external representation and covering women's hair or concealing the female body in and of itself cannot legitimize women's moral, social, political and economic worth. Thus an unveiled Alevi woman cannot impugn her honour or her communities. Thus Alevi women's bodies are what Kilic calls paradoxically 'neutral' and acts as an "ideology of difference.""
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