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Old 10-29-2015, 02:06 PM
 
646 posts, read 348,078 times
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Hey everybody,

I have posted a similar question on the Christianity and A/A boards and now I am asking you:

Do you wish everybody was a Muslim or self-identified as such?

Why or why not?

Anybody can answer but if you are not a Muslim please indicate if you are an atheist/buddhist/whatever.

Thanks!
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Old 10-29-2015, 06:03 PM
 
417 posts, read 451,126 times
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Omg, it would be horrible. No freedom or innovation. Stifled and hypocritical!! The
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Old 10-30-2015, 03:48 AM
 
144 posts, read 108,727 times
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Yes, for their own good.
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Old 10-30-2015, 04:51 AM
 
39,541 posts, read 11,024,191 times
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Interesting, eh, Clicks? The second post is for sure non - Muslim, the last one clearly is.

Btw you can save yourself asking the same question of the Jews.
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Old 10-30-2015, 04:53 AM
 
7,985 posts, read 3,499,306 times
Reputation: 11248
I really can't think of a worse fate!
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Old 10-30-2015, 07:48 AM
 
646 posts, read 348,078 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AREQUIPA View Post
Interesting, eh, Clicks? The second post is for sure non - Muslim, the last one clearly is.

Btw you can save yourself asking the same question of the Jews.
Haha, of course I can. I love attending Shabbat services for a reason.

Still waiting to hear from Woodrow.
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Old 10-30-2015, 03:22 PM
 
Location: Logan Township, Minnesota
15,511 posts, read 13,346,296 times
Reputation: 7407
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cliksder View Post
Haha, of course I can. I love attending Shabbat services for a reason.

Still waiting to hear from Woodrow.
Here I am. Sorry to be late, I had to go to Fargo yesterdan and just got home early this morning.

My answer is "Yes" simply because I would like all people to enter Heaven.

But my Yes has conditions that I have know control over

1. Islam can not be forced upon any one.

2. A Muslim is a person who Follows Islam to the best of their ability and knowledge. There are already too may people who wear the name of Muslim but do not follow Islam

3. A person can only become a Muslim through their own free-will and making and informed choice.

4. Sharia can not apply to non-Muslims


INVOKING A SIDEBAR:
Many people including many Muslims do not know what Sharia actually is. They are only familiar with what the media calls Sharia.

Sharia is any of the Schools of Islamic Jurisprudence. The 4 Accepted Sunni Schools are Maliki, Hanbali, Hanafi and Shari'i.

R\The Criminal laws never fully developed and typically an Islamic Nation will use either secular criminal dodes or local customs. Saudi and several other Arab Nations use a form of Wahabbi whic is not recognized by any Sunni Madhab. Iran uses primarily Jafa'ari which is a Shi'ite code of law.
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Old 10-30-2015, 05:00 PM
 
1,601 posts, read 758,222 times
Reputation: 435
"Do you wish everybody was a Muslim or self-identified as such?
Why or why not?
Anybody can answer but if you are not a Muslim please indicate if you are an atheist/buddhist/whatever."

I am an atheist, but more to the point, I am an Objectivist.

I wish there were NO Muslims. After reading the Quran and hadiths and seeing what is happening in Europe and other places around the world and studying history....after researching Shariah Law and comparing Islam to my own values of rationality, productivity, justice, individual rights, NON-INITIATION OF FORCE!!!!, freedom, self-esteem, independence of mind, integrity and honesty.....I find Islam does not support ANY of my moral values - quite the contrary, Islam is against everything I hold as moral. After receiving all sorts of threats, including death threats, for simply speaking the TRUTH about Islam, I realize what a threat Islam is to people who love truth and freedom.
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Old 10-30-2015, 05:30 PM
 
1,601 posts, read 758,222 times
Reputation: 435
"The Criminal laws never fully developed and typically an Islamic Nation will use either secular criminal dodes or local customs."

Algeria: In criminal cases the testimony of two women are equal to the testimony of one male witness.

Comoros: The legal system is based on both Sharia.[18] According to the article 229-7 of the Penal Code, any Muslim who makes use of products forbidden by Islamic law can be punished by imprisonment of up to six months.[19]

Egypt: Article 2 of Egypt's 2014 Constitution declares the principles of Islamic Sharia to be the main source of legislation.[22] Egypt's law and enforcement system are in flux since its 2011 Revolution;[23] however, the declaration of Sharia's primacy in Article 2 is a potential ground for unconstitutionality of any secular laws in Egyptian legal code.[24] Sharia courts and qadis are run and licensed by the Ministry of Justice.[25] The personal status law that regulates matters such as marriage, divorce and child custody is governed by Sharia. In a family court, a woman’s testimony is worth half of a man’s testimony.[26]

Mali: It has a civil law system influenced by customary law.[16] In urban areas, positive law is common. In rural areas the customary law usually dominates. Local rural versions of sharia are the predominant sources for customary law.[36] Article 25 in Title II of Mali's constitution declares it to be a secular state.[37]

Mauritania: The Penal Code contains Sharia crimes such heresy, apostasy, atheism, refusal to pray, adultery and alcoholism. Punishments include lapidation, amputation and flagellation.[38]

Morocco: In 1956, a Code of Personal Status (Mudawana) was issued, based on dominant Maliki school of Sharia jurisprudence. Regional Sharia courts also hear personal status cases on appeal.[41] In matters of family law, a woman’s testimony is worth only half of that of a man.[42] With 2003 reforms of its criminal law, Article 222 of its new criminal code is derived from Islamic law; Articles 220–221, 268–272 of its criminal law similarly codify those activities as crimes that are prohibited under Sharia.[43] Morocco adopted a new constitution in 2011; Article 41 of this constitution granted sole power to the Superior Council of the Ulemas to guide its laws through Fatwas from principles, precepts and designs of Islam.[44][45]

Somalia: Sharia was adopted in 2009.[53] Article 2 of Somali 2012 Constitution states no law can be enacted that is not compliant with the general principles and objectives of Sharia.[54][55] Sharia currently influences all aspects of Xeer as well as Somalia's formal legal system.[56]

Sudan: Sharia has been declared the chief source of all legislation in Sudan's 1968, 1973 and 1998 Constitutions.[57] In 2005, Sudan adopted an interim national constitution; it removed some references to Sharia, but included Sharia-derived criminal, civil and personal legal codes, as well as Sharia-mandated hudud punishments.[58] The Criminal Act of 1991 prescribes punishments which include forty lashes for drinking alcohol, amputation of the right hand for theft of a certain value and stoning for adultery.[59][60]

Afghanistan: Criminal law in Afghanistan continues to be governed in large part by Islamic law. The Criminal Law of September 1976 codifies sharia, and retains punishments such as the stoning to death of adulterers. However virtually all courts, including the Supreme Court of Afghanistan, rely on Islamic law directly.[66]

Bahrain: Article 2 of Bahrain's 2002 Constitution as originally adopted, as well as after February 2012 amendment, declares Islamic Sharia is a chief source of legislation.[67][68] Four tiers of ordinary courts have jurisdiction over cases related to civil, administrative and criminal matters, with Court of Cassation the highest civil court in Bahrain; in all matters, the judges are required to resort to Sharia in case legislation is silent or unclear.[68]

Brunei Sharia courts decide personal status cases or cases relating to religious offences.[76] Sultan Hassanal Bolkiah declared in 2011 his wish to establish Islamic criminal law as soon as possible.[77] A new penal code enacted in May 2014 will eventually prescribe sharia punishments, including the severing of limbs for property crimes and death by stoning for adultery and homosexuality.[78]

Iran Article 167 of the constitution states that all judicial rulings must be based upon "authoritative Islamic sources and authentic fatwa".[80] Book 2 of the Islamic Penal Code of Iran is entirely devoted to hudud punishments, including flogging and stoning for adultery, and execution for men who have sex with men.[81][82]

Iraq Article 1 of Civil Code identifies Islamic law as a main source of legislation.[83] The 1958 Code, made polygamy extremely difficult, granted child custody to the mother in case of divorce, prohibited repudiation and marriage under the age of 16.[84] In 1995, Iraq introduced Sharia punishment for certain types of criminal offenses.[85]

Jordan Jordan has Sharia courts and civil courts. Sharia courts have jurisdiction over personal status laws, cases concerning Diya (blood money in cases of crime where both parties are Muslims, or one is and both the Muslim and non-Muslim consent to Sharia court's jurisdiction), and matters pertaining to Islamic Waqfs.[89] The Family Law in force is the Personal Status Law of 1976, which is based on Sharia law.[84] In Sharia courts, the testimony of two women is equal to that of one man.[90]

Malaysia Schedule 9 of Malaysian constitution recognizes Islamic law as a state subject; in other words, the states of Malaysia have the power to enact and enforce sharia.[99] Islamic criminal law statutes have been passed at the state level in Terengganu,[100] Kelantan[101] and Perlis,[102][page needed] but as of 2014 none of these laws have been implemented, as they contravene the Federal Constitution.[103][104][105] In 2007, Malaysia's Federal court ruled that apostasy matter lay "within the exclusive jurisdiction of Sharia Courts".[99] Malaysian Muslims can be sentenced to caning for such offences as drinking beer,[106] and adultery.[107] Several sharia crimes, such as khalwat (close proximity of unmarried man and woman) are punishable only in Sharia courts of Malaysia. Publishing an Islamic book that is different from official Malaysian version, without permission, is a crime in some states. Other sharia-based criminal laws were enacted with "Syariah Criminal Offences (Federal Territory) Act of 1997".[99] Muslims are bound by Sharia on personal matters, while members of other faiths follow civil law. Muslims are required to follow Islamic law in family, property and religious matters.[108] In 1988 the constitution was amended to state that civil courts cannot hear matters that fall within the jurisdiction of Sharia courts.[109]

Maldives Article 15 of the Act Number 1/81 (Penal Code) allows for hudud punishments.[110] Article 156 of the constitution states that law includes the norms and provisions of sharia.[111]

Oman's criminal law is based on a combination of Sharia and English common law.[116] Omani commercial law is largely based on Sharia; Article 5 of its Law of Commerce defaults to primacy of Sharia in cases of confusion, silence or conflict.

Pakistan Until 1978 Islamic law was largely restricted to personal status issues. Zia ul Haq introduced Sharia courts and made far reaching changes in the criminal justice system.[117] Articles 203a to 203j of the constitution establish a sharia court with the power to judge any law or government actions to be against Islam, and to review court cases for adherence to Islamic law. The penal code includes elements of sharia.[118] Under article 5, section 2 of the Ordinance No. VII of 1979, whoever is guilty of zina, "if he or she is a muhsan, be stoned to death at a public place; or if he or she is not a mushan, be punished, at a public place, with whipping numbering one hundred stripes".[119] Under a 2006 law, rape cases can be heard under civil as well as Islamic law.[120]

Philippines There are sharia trial and circuit trial courts in Mindanao.

Qatar Sharia law is the main source of Qatari legislation according to Qatar's Constitution.[125][126] Sharia law is applied to laws pertaining to family law, inheritance, and several criminal acts (including adultery, robbery and murder). In some cases in Sharia-based family courts, a female's testimony is worth half a man's and in some cases a female witness is not accepted at all.[127] Flogging is used in Qatar as a punishment for alcohol consumption or illicit sexual relations.[128] Article 88 of Qatar's criminal code declares the punishment for adultery is 100 lashes.[129] Adultery is punishable by death when a Muslim woman and a non-Muslim man are involved.[129] In 2006, a Filipino woman was sentenced to 100 lashes for adultery.[129] In 2012, six expatriates were sentenced to floggings of either 40 or 100 lashes.[128] More recently in April 2013, a Muslim expatriate was sentenced to 40 lashes for alcohol consumption.[130][131][132] In June 2014, a Muslim expatriate was sentenced to 40 lashes for consuming alcohol and driving under the influence.[133] Judicial corporal punishment is common in Qatar due to the Hanbali interpretation of Sharia Law. Article 1 of the Law No. 11 Of 2004 (Penal Code) allows for the application of "Sharia provisions" for the crimes of theft, adultery, defamation, drinking alcohol and apostasy if either the suspect or the victim is a Muslim.[134]

Saudi Arabia Saudi criminal law is based totally on sharia.[135] No codified personal status law exists, which means that judges in courts rule based on their own interpretations of sharia.[136] See Legal system of Saudi Arabia

There's more, if you want to read it all, go here:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Applic...law_by_country
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Old 10-30-2015, 06:11 PM
 
Location: Logan Township, Minnesota
15,511 posts, read 13,346,296 times
Reputation: 7407
Quote:
Originally Posted by juju33312 View Post
"The Criminal laws never fully developed and typically an Islamic Nation will use either secular criminal dodes or local customs."

Algeria: In criminal cases the testimony of two women are equal to the testimony of one male witness.

Comoros: The legal system is based on both Sharia.[18] According to the article 229-7 of the Penal Code, any Muslim who makes use of products forbidden by Islamic law can be punished by imprisonment of up to six months.[19]

Egypt: Article 2 of Egypt's 2014 Constitution declares the principles of Islamic Sharia to be the main source of legislation.[22] Egypt's law and enforcement system are in flux since its 2011 Revolution;[23] however, the declaration of Sharia's primacy in Article 2 is a potential ground for unconstitutionality of any secular laws in Egyptian legal code.[24] Sharia courts and qadis are run and licensed by the Ministry of Justice.[25] The personal status law that regulates matters such as marriage, divorce and child custody is governed by Sharia. In a family court, a woman’s testimony is worth half of a man’s testimony.[26]

Mali: It has a civil law system influenced by customary law.[16] In urban areas, positive law is common. In rural areas the customary law usually dominates. Local rural versions of sharia are the predominant sources for customary law.[36] Article 25 in Title II of Mali's constitution declares it to be a secular state.[37]

Mauritania: The Penal Code contains Sharia crimes such heresy, apostasy, atheism, refusal to pray, adultery and alcoholism. Punishments include lapidation, amputation and flagellation.[38]

Morocco: In 1956, a Code of Personal Status (Mudawana) was issued, based on dominant Maliki school of Sharia jurisprudence. Regional Sharia courts also hear personal status cases on appeal.[41] In matters of family law, a woman’s testimony is worth only half of that of a man.[42] With 2003 reforms of its criminal law, Article 222 of its new criminal code is derived from Islamic law; Articles 220–221, 268–272 of its criminal law similarly codify those activities as crimes that are prohibited under Sharia.[43] Morocco adopted a new constitution in 2011; Article 41 of this constitution granted sole power to the Superior Council of the Ulemas to guide its laws through Fatwas from principles, precepts and designs of Islam.[44][45]

Somalia: Sharia was adopted in 2009.[53] Article 2 of Somali 2012 Constitution states no law can be enacted that is not compliant with the general principles and objectives of Sharia.[54][55] Sharia currently influences all aspects of Xeer as well as Somalia's formal legal system.[56]

Sudan: Sharia has been declared the chief source of all legislation in Sudan's 1968, 1973 and 1998 Constitutions.[57] In 2005, Sudan adopted an interim national constitution; it removed some references to Sharia, but included Sharia-derived criminal, civil and personal legal codes, as well as Sharia-mandated hudud punishments.[58] The Criminal Act of 1991 prescribes punishments which include forty lashes for drinking alcohol, amputation of the right hand for theft of a certain value and stoning for adultery.[59][60]

Afghanistan: Criminal law in Afghanistan continues to be governed in large part by Islamic law. The Criminal Law of September 1976 codifies sharia, and retains punishments such as the stoning to death of adulterers. However virtually all courts, including the Supreme Court of Afghanistan, rely on Islamic law directly.[66]

Bahrain: Article 2 of Bahrain's 2002 Constitution as originally adopted, as well as after February 2012 amendment, declares Islamic Sharia is a chief source of legislation.[67][68] Four tiers of ordinary courts have jurisdiction over cases related to civil, administrative and criminal matters, with Court of Cassation the highest civil court in Bahrain; in all matters, the judges are required to resort to Sharia in case legislation is silent or unclear.[68]

Brunei Sharia courts decide personal status cases or cases relating to religious offences.[76] Sultan Hassanal Bolkiah declared in 2011 his wish to establish Islamic criminal law as soon as possible.[77] A new penal code enacted in May 2014 will eventually prescribe sharia punishments, including the severing of limbs for property crimes and death by stoning for adultery and homosexuality.[78]

Iran Article 167 of the constitution states that all judicial rulings must be based upon "authoritative Islamic sources and authentic fatwa".[80] Book 2 of the Islamic Penal Code of Iran is entirely devoted to hudud punishments, including flogging and stoning for adultery, and execution for men who have sex with men.[81][82]

Iraq Article 1 of Civil Code identifies Islamic law as a main source of legislation.[83] The 1958 Code, made polygamy extremely difficult, granted child custody to the mother in case of divorce, prohibited repudiation and marriage under the age of 16.[84] In 1995, Iraq introduced Sharia punishment for certain types of criminal offenses.[85]

Jordan Jordan has Sharia courts and civil courts. Sharia courts have jurisdiction over personal status laws, cases concerning Diya (blood money in cases of crime where both parties are Muslims, or one is and both the Muslim and non-Muslim consent to Sharia court's jurisdiction), and matters pertaining to Islamic Waqfs.[89] The Family Law in force is the Personal Status Law of 1976, which is based on Sharia law.[84] In Sharia courts, the testimony of two women is equal to that of one man.[90]

Malaysia Schedule 9 of Malaysian constitution recognizes Islamic law as a state subject; in other words, the states of Malaysia have the power to enact and enforce sharia.[99] Islamic criminal law statutes have been passed at the state level in Terengganu,[100] Kelantan[101] and Perlis,[102][page needed] but as of 2014 none of these laws have been implemented, as they contravene the Federal Constitution.[103][104][105] In 2007, Malaysia's Federal court ruled that apostasy matter lay "within the exclusive jurisdiction of Sharia Courts".[99] Malaysian Muslims can be sentenced to caning for such offences as drinking beer,[106] and adultery.[107] Several sharia crimes, such as khalwat (close proximity of unmarried man and woman) are punishable only in Sharia courts of Malaysia. Publishing an Islamic book that is different from official Malaysian version, without permission, is a crime in some states. Other sharia-based criminal laws were enacted with "Syariah Criminal Offences (Federal Territory) Act of 1997".[99] Muslims are bound by Sharia on personal matters, while members of other faiths follow civil law. Muslims are required to follow Islamic law in family, property and religious matters.[108] In 1988 the constitution was amended to state that civil courts cannot hear matters that fall within the jurisdiction of Sharia courts.[109]

Maldives Article 15 of the Act Number 1/81 (Penal Code) allows for hudud punishments.[110] Article 156 of the constitution states that law includes the norms and provisions of sharia.[111]

Oman's criminal law is based on a combination of Sharia and English common law.[116] Omani commercial law is largely based on Sharia; Article 5 of its Law of Commerce defaults to primacy of Sharia in cases of confusion, silence or conflict.

Pakistan Until 1978 Islamic law was largely restricted to personal status issues. Zia ul Haq introduced Sharia courts and made far reaching changes in the criminal justice system.[117] Articles 203a to 203j of the constitution establish a sharia court with the power to judge any law or government actions to be against Islam, and to review court cases for adherence to Islamic law. The penal code includes elements of sharia.[118] Under article 5, section 2 of the Ordinance No. VII of 1979, whoever is guilty of zina, "if he or she is a muhsan, be stoned to death at a public place; or if he or she is not a mushan, be punished, at a public place, with whipping numbering one hundred stripes".[119] Under a 2006 law, rape cases can be heard under civil as well as Islamic law.[120]

Philippines There are sharia trial and circuit trial courts in Mindanao.

Qatar Sharia law is the main source of Qatari legislation according to Qatar's Constitution.[125][126] Sharia law is applied to laws pertaining to family law, inheritance, and several criminal acts (including adultery, robbery and murder). In some cases in Sharia-based family courts, a female's testimony is worth half a man's and in some cases a female witness is not accepted at all.[127] Flogging is used in Qatar as a punishment for alcohol consumption or illicit sexual relations.[128] Article 88 of Qatar's criminal code declares the punishment for adultery is 100 lashes.[129] Adultery is punishable by death when a Muslim woman and a non-Muslim man are involved.[129] In 2006, a Filipino woman was sentenced to 100 lashes for adultery.[129] In 2012, six expatriates were sentenced to floggings of either 40 or 100 lashes.[128] More recently in April 2013, a Muslim expatriate was sentenced to 40 lashes for alcohol consumption.[130][131][132] In June 2014, a Muslim expatriate was sentenced to 40 lashes for consuming alcohol and driving under the influence.[133] Judicial corporal punishment is common in Qatar due to the Hanbali interpretation of Sharia Law. Article 1 of the Law No. 11 Of 2004 (Penal Code) allows for the application of "Sharia provisions" for the crimes of theft, adultery, defamation, drinking alcohol and apostasy if either the suspect or the victim is a Muslim.[134]

Saudi Arabia Saudi criminal law is based totally on sharia.[135] No codified personal status law exists, which means that judges in courts rule based on their own interpretations of sharia.[136] See Legal system of Saudi Arabia

There's more, if you want to read it all, go here:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Applic...law_by_country
Only answering the last part.

The laws in Saudi are based upon the al-Saud Monarchy and Wahhabism. It is not recognized as Sharia criminal law no matter what they call it.

Quote:
The Saud Family and Wahhabi Islam
Saudi Arabia Table of Contents

The Al Saud originated in Ad Diriyah, in the center of Najd, close to the modern capital of Riyadh. Around 1500 ancestors of Saud ibn Muhammad took over some date groves, one of the few forms of agriculture the region could support, and settled there. Over time the area developed into a small town, and the clan that would become the Al Saud came to be recognized as its leaders.

The rise of Al Saud is closely linked with Muhammad ibn Abd al Wahhab (died 1792), a Muslim scholar whose ideas form the basis of the Wahhabi movement. He grew up in Uyaynah, an oasis in southern Najd, where he studied with his grandfather Hanbali Islamic law, one of the strictest Muslim legal schools. While still a young man, he left Uyaynah to study with other teachers, the usual way to pursue higher education in the Islamic world. He studied in Medina and then went to Iraq and to Iran.

Saudi Arabia - THE SAUD FAMILY AND WAHHABI ISLAM
The other nations also are using their own concepts of sharia. there is no nation that actually uses Sharia criminal law although most Islamic Nations do use Sharia Civil Laws.
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