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Old 11-16-2015, 04:16 AM
 
Location: quiet place
271 posts, read 214,739 times
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As a Muslim Arab, I find this question very funny

first, you should not take as a fact that my wife, sister and daughter feel oppressed coz they do not wear a mini skirt ...etc. also, you can not talk instead of them coz we live, thanks to Allah, good life and happy with our beliefs.
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Old 11-16-2015, 06:00 AM
 
6,893 posts, read 3,400,268 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by resigned View Post
As a Muslim Arab, I find this question very funny

first, you should not take as a fact that my wife, sister and daughter feel oppressed coz they do not wear a mini skirt ...etc. also, you can not talk instead of them coz we live, thanks to Allah, good life and happy with our beliefs.

But, your speaking for them speaks volumes.

Oppression is not about wishing to wear short skirts. It is interesting you reduced oppression to a short skirt.

Misogyny ends, when men stop speaking for women in all faiths, and cultures.

Last edited by RonkonkomaNative; 11-16-2015 at 06:20 AM.. Reason: Adding
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Old 11-20-2015, 05:11 PM
 
Location: Bordentown
1,707 posts, read 1,131,205 times
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Why do mosques have separate entrances for men and women? Why can't men and women sit together at a muslim wedding and they must be separated?

Also, all religions marginalize women. Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, etc.
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Old 11-20-2015, 05:18 PM
 
Location: Bordentown
1,707 posts, read 1,131,205 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by resigned View Post
As a Muslim Arab, I find this question very funny

first, you should not take as a fact that my wife, sister and daughter feel oppressed coz they do not wear a mini skirt ...etc. also, you can not talk instead of them coz we live, thanks to Allah, good life and happy with our beliefs.
You might live the happy life because your religion favors you. I bet your wi(ves), daughters, and mother are pretty miserable living under your religion walking around dressed as a tent. Your wife and daughter, especially, must be lucky women.

And as for wearing a mini skirt? Try wearing something that has them showing their hands or, heaven forbid, their face. Why don't men wear a hijab or niqqab and see what it's like?

What a nice way you people treat women: One woman's account of having to cover her head in Iraq
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Old 11-20-2015, 06:02 PM
 
Location: Logan Township, Minnesota
15,511 posts, read 13,299,862 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SageCats View Post
Why do mosques have separate entrances for men and women? Why can't men and women sit together at a muslim wedding and they must be separated?



Also, all religions marginalize women. Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, etc.
For the actual wedding there is no required ceremony. It is the witnessed signing of a contract. this can be done any place. All that is needed is the man and women and the witnesses provided by each.

What is often seen as a wedding is the walimah, a big bash where they announce to the community they are married. Men and women do not socialize together. they are in separate areas where ever the walimah is held.

Because a Mosque is for praying, not socializing. Also becase the genders are not to look at each other during the prayers. there are separate areas for men and women inside a Mosque.
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Old 11-20-2015, 07:15 PM
 
1,601 posts, read 753,593 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodrow LI View Post

Because a Mosque is for praying, not socializing.
In reality:

" (The mosque) should be a place where community social functions can take place with Islamic guidelines whether it is an Iftar party, eid party, marriage, or aqeeqa ceremony that takes place. It should be a place where Muslim men can socialize with other Muslim men and women with women, young boys with young boys, and girls with girls. Not necessarily in the prayer area but, in other areas of the mosque. "
ISLAM-USA - Roles of a Mosque in a Muslim Community

"By early 2009, Yusuf Mosque opened its doors for the first time to the community for prayers, lectures and socializing."
Beautiful Mosque Pictures
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Old 11-20-2015, 07:17 PM
 
1,601 posts, read 753,593 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodrow LI View Post
Men and women do not socialize together. they are in separate areas where ever the walimah is held.
... Also becase the genders are not to look at each other during the prayers. there are separate areas for men and women inside a Mosque.
The question is: WHY?
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Old 11-21-2015, 12:03 AM
 
Location: Chicagoland
5,655 posts, read 8,672,001 times
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I am a woman and attended a Muslim wedding in Rabat, Morocco many years ago (I met the groom in college). And I should emphasize this was a wedding of the highest social classes. This is what I remember:

For several days before the wedding, the bride came each evening (traveling through the historic town on a white horse) to bear lavish gifts (dowry?) for the groom.

At the reception (walimah), beautiful Moroccan rugs covered the floor of the bright, lantern lit wedding tent, lavish platters of gourmet food - lamb, fish, figs, tabbouleh, sweet fruits - were set out and minstrels played wonderful music.

The men and women were completely separated (I was traveling with two men so I was left alone with approx. 20 women in jihab who I did not know, and I could only see their eyes... barely). My friends and all the men were led into the lavish wedding tent and proceeded to dance together to the music, talk, laugh, smoke fragrant hookah, and feast on the succulent food. The staff attended to their every need.

The women, otoh, had to stay in the darkness in a sand lot quite a distance from the tent. We crouched down in the sand rather than on soft rugs, and were offered no food or drink, no music or dancing, no light to see each other. I don't even remember the women speaking. We were only there to watch the men enjoy themselves in the distance. We were able to use a bathroom, which was a Turkish hole in the ground with no TP/water. We stayed like that, crouching in the darkness for hours, quietly watching the men celebrate.

Eventually, a woman whispered to me, in French, that we were being rewarded with delicious food - I guess we had earned that. And I'll never forget what happened next - the mostly eaten lamb carcass (the scraps) from the men's party tent was placed on the dark ground in front of us, and the women, using their hands, hungrily started tearing the flesh off the remains of the lamb. I hesitated, desperately searching for some untouched area of meat (as I said, the communal toilets had no TP or running water) as the women watched me expectantly. I gingerly pulled off a small piece - the only thing I would eat that night.

And that is what I remember about the separation of men and women at a Muslim wedding.

Last edited by GoCUBS1; 11-21-2015 at 12:17 AM..
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Old 11-21-2015, 12:33 AM
 
4,431 posts, read 1,652,849 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoCUBS1 View Post
I am a woman and attended a Muslim wedding in Rabat, Morocco many years ago (I met the groom in college). And I should emphasize this was a wedding of the highest social classes. This is what I remember:

For several days before the wedding, the bride came each evening (traveling through the historic town on a white horse) to bear lavish gifts (dowry?) for the groom.

At the reception (walimah), beautiful Moroccan rugs covered the floor of the bright, lantern lit wedding tent, lavish platters of gourmet food - lamb, fish, figs, tabbouleh, sweet fruits - were set out and minstrels played wonderful music.

The men and women were completely separated (I was traveling with two men so I was left alone with approx. 20 women in jihab who I did not know, and I could only see their eyes... barely). My friends and all the men were led into the lavish wedding tent and proceeded to dance together to the music, talk, laugh, smoke fragrant hookah, and feast on the succulent food. The staff attended to their every need.

The women, otoh, had to stay in the darkness in a sand lot quite a distance from the tent. We crouched down in the sand rather than on soft rugs, and were offered no food or drink, no music or dancing, no light to see each other. I don't even remember the women speaking. We were only there to watch the men enjoy themselves in the distance. We were able to use a bathroom, which was a Turkish hole in the ground with no TP/water. We stayed like that, crouching in the darkness for hours, quietly watching the men celebrate.

Eventually, a woman whispered to me, in French, that we were being rewarded with delicious food - I guess we had earned that. And I'll never forget what happened next - the mostly eaten lamb carcass (the scraps) from the men's party tent was placed on the dark ground in front of us, and the women, using their hands, hungrily started tearing the flesh off the remains of the lamb. I hesitated, desperately searching for some untouched area of meat (as I said, the communal toilets had no TP or running water) as the women watched me expectantly. I gingerly pulled off a small piece - the only thing I would eat that night.

And that is what I remember about the separation of men and women at a Muslim wedding.
Don't you think it MAY have something to do with their CULTURE rather than their "RELIGION"?

Here are a couple of another ones, (simple YT search). There are tons of em on YT, and they are all real!






Last edited by GoCardinals; 11-21-2015 at 12:45 AM..
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Old 11-21-2015, 09:36 AM
 
Location: Chicagoland
5,655 posts, read 8,672,001 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoCardinals View Post
Don't you think it MAY have something to do with their CULTURE rather than their "RELIGION"?
]
So this is simply cultural?

359 rules related to marriage and its ceremonies. Rules relating to marriage and its ceremonies | A Code of Ethics for Muslim Men and Women | Books on Islam and Muslims | Al-Islam.org

Some rules relating to women -

337 - Question: Is it allowed to be present in wedding ceremonies in which there are musical instruments, drums, dancing or singing going on, if it is a wedding of someone in the family, or we are obliged to go?

Answer: It is haram to take part in gatherings in which there are vain and futile things going on just because it is a relative’s wedding does not make it permissible.

284 – Rule: According to Ihtiyat Wajib, it is not permitted for women to dance anywhere, whether it is at wedding parties, birthdays, etc… and the only exception is the dancing of the woman for her husband.

Therefore: Women are not permitted to dance at wedding parties, etc… even if non-Mahram men are not present.

342 – Question: Is it permissible to listen to certain kinds of music with the intention that listening to them is not for vain and entertaining purposes? For example, music that is said to be good to calm the nerves or music that some doctors recommend as a cure, or that form of music which has been composed for wars – in which the aim and purpose of them is not for vain acts?

Answer: It is haram to listen to any kind of sound that the general public would consider as music.
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