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Old 06-09-2016, 01:27 AM
 
Location: Not-a-Theist
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Khalif View Post
Further, you have claimed here in one of the posts that you understand Arabic. Despite claiming so, you still write "Koran" rather than Qur'an or Qur'aan. We can excuse a non-Arabic speaker if he writes "Koran" but an Arabic speaker like you should not write "Koran" instead of Qur'an.
I believe what is critical is the referent and not the word itself whether "Quran" "Koran" or whatever.

Quote:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Referent
In fields such as semantics and semiotics, a distinction is made between a referent and a reference.
Reference is a relationship in which a symbol or sign (a word, for example) signifies something; the referent is the thing signified.
The referent may be an actual person or object, or may be something more abstract, such as a set of actions.
Re the above here is an interesting write-up from wiki re the Etymological and Meaning of the Quran or Koran;

"Quran" Etymological and Meaning
The word qurʼān appears about 70 times in the Quran itself, assuming various meanings. It is a verbal noun (maṣdar) of the Arabic verb qaraʼa (قرأ), meaning "he read" or "he recited". The Syriac equivalent is (ܩܪܝܢܐ) qeryānā, which refers to "scripture reading" or "lesson".[21] While some Western scholars consider the word to be derived from the Syriac, the majority of Muslim authorities hold the origin of the word is qaraʼa itself.[1] Regardless, it had become an Arabic term by Muhammad's lifetime.[1] An important meaning of the word is the "act of reciting", as reflected in an early Quranic passage: "It is for Us to collect it and to recite it (qurʼānahu)."[22]

In other verses, the word refers to "an individual passage recited [by Muhammad]". Its liturgical context is seen in a number of passages, for example: "So when al-qurʼān is recited, listen to it and keep silent."[23] The word may also assume the meaning of a codified scripture when mentioned with other scriptures such as the Torah and Gospel.[24]

The term also has closely related synonyms that are employed throughout the Quran. Each synonym possesses its own distinct meaning, but its use may converge with that of qurʼān in certain contexts. Such terms include kitāb (book); āyah (sign); and sūrah (scripture). The latter two terms also denote units of revelation. In the large majority of contexts, usually with a definite article (al-), the word is referred to as the "revelation" (waḥy), that which has been "sent down" (tanzīl) at intervals.[25][26] Other related words are: dhikr (remembrance), used to refer to the Quran in the sense of a reminder and warning, and ḥikmah (wisdom), sometimes referring to the revelation or part of it.[1][27]

The Quran describes itself as "the discernment" (al-furqān), "the mother book" (umm al-kitāb), "the guide" (huda), "the wisdom" (hikmah), "the remembrance" (dhikr) and "the revelation" (tanzīl; something sent down, signifying the descent of an object from a higher place to lower place).[28] Another term is al-kitāb (The Book), though it is also used in the Arabic language for other scriptures, such as the Torah and the Gospels. The adjective of "Quran" has multiple transliterations including "quranic", "koranic", and "qur'anic", or capitalised as "Qur'anic", "Koranic", and "Quranic". The term mus'haf ('written work') is often used to refer to particular Quranic manuscripts but is also used in the Quran to identify earlier revealed books.[1] Other transliterations of "Quran" include "al-Coran", "Coran", "Kuran", and "al-Qurʼan".[29]

............
Any other views on the above?
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Old 06-10-2016, 06:33 PM
 
Location: Logan Township, Minnesota
15,511 posts, read 13,274,304 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Continuum View Post
I believe what is critical is the referent and not the word itself whether "Quran" "Koran" or whatever.



Re the above here is an interesting write-up from wiki re the Etymological and Meaning of the Quran or Koran;

"Quran" Etymological and Meaning
The word qurʼān appears about 70 times in the Quran itself, assuming various meanings. It is a verbal noun (maṣdar) of the Arabic verb qaraʼa (قرأ), meaning "he read" or "he recited". The Syriac equivalent is (ܩܪܝܢܐ) qeryānā, which refers to "scripture reading" or "lesson".[21] While some Western scholars consider the word to be derived from the Syriac, the majority of Muslim authorities hold the origin of the word is qaraʼa itself.[1] Regardless, it had become an Arabic term by Muhammad's lifetime.[1] An important meaning of the word is the "act of reciting", as reflected in an early Quranic passage: "It is for Us to collect it and to recite it (qurʼānahu)."[22]

In other verses, the word refers to "an individual passage recited [by Muhammad]". Its liturgical context is seen in a number of passages, for example: "So when al-qurʼān is recited, listen to it and keep silent."[23] The word may also assume the meaning of a codified scripture when mentioned with other scriptures such as the Torah and Gospel.[24]

The term also has closely related synonyms that are employed throughout the Quran. Each synonym possesses its own distinct meaning, but its use may converge with that of qurʼān in certain contexts. Such terms include kitāb (book); āyah (sign); and sūrah (scripture). The latter two terms also denote units of revelation. In the large majority of contexts, usually with a definite article (al-), the word is referred to as the "revelation" (waḥy), that which has been "sent down" (tanzīl) at intervals.[25][26] Other related words are: dhikr (remembrance), used to refer to the Quran in the sense of a reminder and warning, and ḥikmah (wisdom), sometimes referring to the revelation or part of it.[1][27]

The Quran describes itself as "the discernment" (al-furqān), "the mother book" (umm al-kitāb), "the guide" (huda), "the wisdom" (hikmah), "the remembrance" (dhikr) and "the revelation" (tanzīl; something sent down, signifying the descent of an object from a higher place to lower place).[28] Another term is al-kitāb (The Book), though it is also used in the Arabic language for other scriptures, such as the Torah and the Gospels. The adjective of "Quran" has multiple transliterations including "quranic", "koranic", and "qur'anic", or capitalised as "Qur'anic", "Koranic", and "Quranic". The term mus'haf ('written work') is often used to refer to particular Quranic manuscripts but is also used in the Quran to identify earlier revealed books.[1] Other transliterations of "Quran" include "al-Coran", "Coran", "Kuran", and "al-Qurʼan".[29]

............
Any other views on the above?
I think the whole point of Khalif's post is he was pointing out that mahasn sawresho claims to read Arabic but spells Koran instead of Qur'an as an Arabic reader typically would do. It is a bit out of place for a reader of Arabic to spell it as Koran instead of using the English equivalent of the Arabic letters.

ADDENDUM(added 6/11) To Clarify in Arabic it is spelled "Qaf Raah Alif Noon" (Qaf transliterates as the English letters Qu) it is not spelled "Kaf Waaw Raah Noon" (Kaf Waaw transliterates as the English letter K O) an Arabic speaker is not likely to transliterate Qaf as KO KHalif's point being mahasn sawresho does not appear to speak Arabic as he claims. Which is what Khalif's post is about.
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Last edited by Woodrow LI; 06-11-2016 at 07:04 AM..
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Old 06-14-2016, 10:53 PM
 
2,050 posts, read 660,682 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodrow LI View Post
I think the whole point of Khalif's post is he was pointing out that mahasn sawresho claims to read Arabic but spells Koran instead of Qur'an as an Arabic reader typically would do. It is a bit out of place for a reader of Arabic to spell it as Koran instead of using the English equivalent of the Arabic letters.

ADDENDUM(added 6/11) To Clarify in Arabic it is spelled "Qaf Raah Alif Noon" (Qaf transliterates as the English letters Qu) it is not spelled "Kaf Waaw Raah Noon" (Kaf Waaw transliterates as the English letter K O) an Arabic speaker is not likely to transliterate Qaf as KO KHalif's point being mahasn sawresho does not appear to speak Arabic as he claims. Which is what Khalif's post is about.
i am speak Arabic and writing Arabic
And friend Continuum ask of the original
The word Koran is true Because I speak the ancient language to this day, in addition to Arabic
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Old 06-15-2016, 05:30 AM
 
Location: Logan Township, Minnesota
15,511 posts, read 13,274,304 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mahasn sawresho View Post
i am speak Arabic and writing Arabic
And friend Continuum ask of the original
The word Koran is true Because I speak the ancient language to this day, in addition to Arabic
Then why do you spell Koran with Kaaf (K) and not Qur'an with Qaf (Qu)?
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Old 06-15-2016, 01:22 PM
 
3,166 posts, read 1,036,278 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mahasn sawresho View Post
i am speak Arabic and writing Arabic
And friend Continuum ask of the original
The word Koran is true Because I speak the ancient language to this day, in addition to Arabic
Which "ancient language" do you speak to this day?

And what does "Koran" in your "ancient language" mean?
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Old 06-15-2016, 01:30 PM
 
3,166 posts, read 1,036,278 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodrow LI View Post
Then why do you spell Koran with Kaaf (K) and not Qur'an with Qaf (Qu)?
Good question!
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Old 06-15-2016, 01:31 PM
 
2,050 posts, read 660,682 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodrow LI View Post
Then why do you spell Koran with Kaaf (K) and not Qur'an with Qaf (Qu)?
This Google translation
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Old 06-15-2016, 02:12 PM
 
2,050 posts, read 660,682 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Khalif View Post
Which "ancient language" do you speak to this day?

And what does "Koran" in your "ancient language" mean?
Chaldean and Assyrian
we say قري --قريانا -قريونا --
The origin of the word )(q) Koran
Look in the Arabic language dictionaries
Arabs say قراء-قراءة-يقراء-
But the wedding of the word is derived from the original source did not change to Aarabah
The researchers know these facts through research
You can not know the meaning

Qur'an: (name)
Quran: source read
Qur'an: (name)
Source read:
This is contrary to the rules of the Arabic language
The oldest in the Arabic language
I apologize from the desire to seek to do so

The reason so our friend not says we lie
And offer you a different Arabic Dictionary
The meaning of the Qur'an in the Arabic language dictionaries - English-Arabic Dictionary
Horny (glossary of Arabic language and contemporary)
قرن2 (معجم اللغة العربية المعاصرة)
قرن2 / قرن بـ يقرن ويقرن ، قرانا ، فهو قارن ، والمفعول مقرون ( للمتعدي ) قرن بين الزوجين : زوجهما ، جمع بينهما بالعقد . قرن بين الحج والعمرة / قرن الحج بالعمرة : وصلهما ، جمع بينهما في الإحرام
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Old 06-15-2016, 07:48 PM
 
Location: Logan Township, Minnesota
15,511 posts, read 13,274,304 times
Reputation: 7407
Quote:
Originally Posted by mahasn sawresho View Post
Chaldean and Assyrian
we say قري --قريانا -قريونا --
The origin of the word )(q) Koran
Look in the Arabic language dictionaries
Arabs say قراء-قراءة-يقراء-
But the wedding of the word is derived from the original source did not change to Aarabah
The researchers know these facts through research
You can not know the meaning

Qur'an: (name)
Quran: source read
Qur'an: (name)
Source read:
This is contrary to the rules of the Arabic language
The oldest in the Arabic language
I apologize from the desire to seek to do so

The reason so our friend not says we lie
And offer you a different Arabic Dictionary
The meaning of the Qur'an in the Arabic language dictionaries - English-Arabic Dictionary
Horny (glossary of Arabic language and contemporary)
قرن2 (معجم اللغة العربية المعاصرة)
قرن2 / قرن بـ يقرن ويقرن ، قرانا ، فهو قارن ، والمفعول مقرون ( للمتعدي ) قرن بين الزوجين : زوجهما ، جمع بينهما بالعقد . قرن بين الحج والعمرة / قرن الحج بالعمرة : وصلهما ، جمع بينهما في الإحرام
I see the confusion is being caused by online translators. for example using Google translator your last 2 sentences translate as:

Century 2 ( glossary of Arabic and contemporary )
Century 2 / century by pairs and pairs , it reads , compare it , and cis -acting ( the infringer ) century between spouses : Zojhma , collect their contract. century between the Hajj and Umrah / Hajj Umrah century : and spirituality , combine them in Ihram
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Old 06-15-2016, 08:44 PM
 
3,166 posts, read 1,036,278 times
Reputation: 289
Quote:
Originally Posted by mahasn sawresho View Post
Chaldean and Assyrian
we say قري --قريانا -قريونا --
The origin of the word )(q) Koran
Look in the Arabic language dictionaries
Arabs say قراء-قراءة-يقراء-
All the 6 words you have written here, whether in your ancient language or in Arabic, include Qaf rather than K. Even "baqarah" has qaf (q) in it, and none have K in it. Therefore, there was no need for you to write Koran rather than Qur'an or Quran. So stop giving us all this crap about Qri = Qriana - Qruna. All begin with Qaf rather than the English equivalent K. The alphabet in your ancient language and Arabic is the same in term of inclusion of Qaf. There is no excuse for you not to write Qur'an or Quran.
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