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Old 05-12-2010, 10:19 AM
 
1,003 posts, read 2,256,461 times
Reputation: 669

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Quote:
Originally Posted by JacksonPanther View Post
This state has a terrible reputation when it comes to race, because they EARNED it. This state let it be known that if you get out of line, you will be killed (see, Emmett Till, and the Freedom Riders). This state let it be known that "they" will not gain access to "our" public schools, without a fight (see Governor Ross Barnett).
In 1953, public schools were just fine for White kids, but by 1955, public schools were not good enough for "us" and are only for "them," and white kids suddenly attended the dozens of new "academies" that suddenly sprang up. You tell me what happened in 1954.

Mississippi's reputation is well-deserved. Don't blame it on the media, movies, books, or ignorant people. We all need to OWN it.
No, actually blacks kids did go to public schools! And they also used the same text books the white kids used! It was Thurgood Marshall who promoted desegregation in 1950, indicating that kids going to school in their OWN district was not a good idea. He specifically stated that black kids had to be in the SAME classrooms as white kids in order to have the best chance of an equal education. When black kids were segregated they did not learn as well in spite of being taught the same material. This is what started much of the well deserve tension against the black race when they demanded busing kids into different neighborhoods. Boston had experienced this head on back in the 1970's. It has been proven over and over, blacks must rely on whites to be uplifted! They could not do it on their own!

Incidently, in 1896 the Plessy v. Ferguson case held that as long as separate facilities for separate races were equal, segregation did not violate the fourteenth amendment.

Last edited by 1979; 05-12-2010 at 10:30 AM..

 
Old 05-12-2010, 10:52 AM
 
Location: Floribama
13,583 posts, read 29,563,482 times
Reputation: 11988
Quote:
Originally Posted by jxndean View Post
My professor was showing our class a video about the racial segregation that occurred in Jackson during the 60's and also the riots that steamed from them.
Just curious if your professor also showed video of the segregation and riots in other parts of the country (Boston, St Louis, etc), or did he/she only focus on MS and the South?
 
Old 05-12-2010, 11:02 AM
NWS
 
Location: Port Orange, Florida
721 posts, read 1,453,197 times
Reputation: 355
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1979 View Post
No, actually blacks kids did go to public schools! And they also used the same text books the white kids used! It was Thurgood Marshall who promoted desegregation in 1950, indicating that kids going to school in their OWN district was not a good idea. He specifically stated that black kids had to be in the SAME classrooms as white kids in order to have the best chance of an equal education. When black kids were segregated they did not learn as well in spite of being taught the same material. This is what started much of the well deserve tension against the black race when they demanded busing kids into different neighborhoods. Boston had experienced this head on back in the 1970's. It has been proven over and over, blacks must rely on whites to be uplifted! They could not do it on their own!

Incidently, in 1896 the Plessy v. Ferguson case held that as long as separate facilities for separate races were equal, segregation did not violate the fourteenth amendment.
1979 please don't come here and try to rewrite history and blame it on Thurgood Marshall.
Blacks in the segregated South did not have "separate but equal" schools.
If you have read anything and I mean anything about the Brown vs Board of education case you would know that.

Brown vs. Board of Education - Background Summary (http://brownvboard.org/summary/ - broken link)

The decision was based on 5 cases brought before the court from 5 states.

Delaware – Belton v. Gebhart (Bulah v. Gebhart)

First petitioned in 1951, these local cases challenged the inferior conditions of two black schools designated for African American children.
In the suburb of Claymont, African American children were prohibited from attending the area’s local high school.
Instead, they had to ride a school bus for nearly an hour to attend Howard High School in Wilmington. Located in an industrial area of the state’s capital city,
Howard High School also suffered from a deficient curriculum, pupil-teacher ratio, teacher training, extra curricular activities program, and physical plant.
In the rural community of Hockessin, African American students were forced to attend a dilapidated one-room school house and were not provided transportation to the school,
while white children in the area were provided transportation and a better school facility....

Kansas – Brown v. Board of Education
In 1950 ...The local NAACP assembled a group of 13 parents who agreed to be plaintiffs on behalf of their 20 children.
Following direction from legal counsel they attempted to enroll their children in segregated white schools and all were denied.
Topeka operated eighteen neighborhood schools for white children, while African American children had access to only four schools.

South Carolina - Briggs v. Elliot

...The Court found that the schools designated for African Americans were grossly inadequate in terms of buildings,
transportation and teacher’s salaries when compared to the schools provided for whites.
An order to equalize the facilities was virtually ignored by school officials and the schools were never made equal. ...

Virginia – Davis v. County School Board of Prince Edward County

One of the few public high schools available to African Americans in the state was Robert Moton High School in Prince Edward County.
Built in 1943, it was never large enough to accommodate its student population. Eventually hastily constructed tar paper covered buildings were added as classrooms. ...
Although the U.S. District Court ordered that the plaintiffs be provided with equal school facilities, they were denied access to the white schools in their area.

Washington, DC – Bolling v. C. Melvin Sharpe

Eleven African American junior High School students were taken on a field trip to the cities new modern John Phillip Sousa school for whites only.
Accompanied by local activist Gardner Bishop, who requested admittance for the students and was denied,
the African American students were ordered to return to their grossly inadequate school. A suit was filed on their behalf in 1951.
After review with the Brown case in 1954, the Supreme Court ruled "segregation in the District of Columbia public schools…is a denial of the due process of law guaranteed by the Fifth Amendment…"


1979 If Blacks had been given the same quality of schools, books, teachers and funding we probably wouldn't be have this discussion and this country would be in a better place today.
 
Old 05-12-2010, 04:16 PM
 
4 posts, read 11,331 times
Reputation: 13
Hmm. Obviously the real tension is over whether or not there IS tension... kind of self propagating, isn't it?

I moved away from Jackson many years ago but go back often to visit. The city that I loved dearly is not the same place it used to be.

Growing up, none of us, of any race, ever gave a thought about racial differences. My schooling was through public schools. I graduated from a forced bussed public school (all the way across town) and had just as many minority friends as non-minority, some well to do and some barely above poverty (all races). The only thing that mattered was whether someone was honest or had integrity.

None of us were better than any other. We were all just friends and classmates. That is, until demagoguery began to take place. People with hidden agendas began promoting the idea that there was a problem so they could provide solutions to non-existent problems - on BOTH sides of the "issue". Things changed. Paranoia set in and tensions were created where there really were not any before.

It is only possible to know where you are going if you recognize where you've been, but Jackson will never move forward if it keeps its feet buried in the past. Too many people on BOTH sides of the obfuscated idea of tension are have their own agendas.

But then again, maybe I just miss my childhood friends.
 
Old 05-12-2010, 04:34 PM
 
Location: North Jackson
1,871 posts, read 2,987,167 times
Reputation: 2379
Quote:
Originally Posted by BealeD View Post
Growing up, none of us, of any race, ever gave a thought about racial differences. My schooling was through public schools. I graduated from a forced bussed public school (all the way across town) and had just as many minority friends as non-minority, some well to do and some barely above poverty (all races).
Would you mind describing the time-frame when you were in school in Jackson? Was this the 50s, 60s, 70s, 80s? The reason I ask is that I can't imagine a time when there were enough White people in the Jackson public schools to even be bussed. Pretty much all the White kids in the public schools go to Casey, McWillie (only in the Montesorri), Power APAC, or Murrah.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BealeD View Post
None of us were better than any other. We were all just friends and classmates. That is, until demagoguery began to take place. People with hidden agendas began promoting the idea that there was a problem so they could provide solutions to non-existent problems - on BOTH sides of the "issue". Things changed. Paranoia set in and tensions were created where there really were not any before.
Please, expand on your comments here. What agendas? What demagogues? In your opinion, what happened?
 
Old 05-12-2010, 04:52 PM
 
Location: North Jackson
1,871 posts, read 2,987,167 times
Reputation: 2379
Quote:
Originally Posted by HumboldtParkShiner View Post
is the south particularly resentful towards latinos? I know a huge disrespect towards latino's here in new orleans from both whites and especially blacks. much different than up in my home town of Chicago. comments?
Hey, buddy. A fellow Chicagoan (actually, an Oak Parker). You're right, this part of the south is drastically different than Chicago. As you discovered, other than Blacks and Whites there really are no other significant racial groups. Few Hispanics, Asians, or East Indians.

But within the Whites and Blacks, I am finding NO interaction between the two groups. As a former Oak Park resident I find this very disturbing. And as long as this lack of interaction continues, relationships will only get worse. Without any interaction people start to imagine what the other group is thinking, and it just gets worse and worse.
 
Old 05-14-2010, 02:26 PM
 
361 posts, read 929,807 times
Reputation: 271
Quote:
Originally Posted by JacksonPanther View Post
Hey, buddy. A fellow Chicagoan (actually, an Oak Parker). You're right, this part of the south is drastically different than Chicago. As you discovered, other than Blacks and Whites there really are no other significant racial groups. Few Hispanics, Asians, or East Indians.

But within the Whites and Blacks, I am finding NO interaction between the two groups. As a former Oak Park resident I find this very disturbing. And as long as this lack of interaction continues, relationships will only get worse. Without any interaction people start to imagine what the other group is thinking, and it just gets worse and worse.
that is too bad to hear that. new orleans, where i am at now, actually completely blew me away at race relations. They seem to be ages ahead of Chicago, believe it or not. the divide here is more between classes rather than race. whites and blacks do everything together, from work and play, and live together as neighbors on the same street. i can not say the same for hispanics though unfortunately, both groups seems to discriminate heavily against them. though black/white relations is one of the few pluses of new orleans. don't let mayor nagin and the chocolate city reference throw you off, blacks and whites seem to get along virtually on the same level here. although unfortunately like in many other places, the black population still has their fare share of hard ships. i think many cities and states could take a page out of new orleans in terms of race relations tho. it is second only to nyc imo. it's too bad mississippi though is still so far behind.
 
Old 05-14-2010, 07:16 PM
 
Location: New Orleans, United States
4,230 posts, read 8,892,428 times
Reputation: 1398
Quote:
Originally Posted by HumboldtParkShiner View Post
that is too bad to hear that. new orleans, where i am at now, actually completely blew me away at race relations. They seem to be ages ahead of Chicago, believe it or not. the divide here is more between classes rather than race. whites and blacks do everything together, from work and play, and live together as neighbors on the same street. i can not say the same for hispanics though unfortunately, both groups seems to discriminate heavily against them. though black/white relations is one of the few pluses of new orleans. don't let mayor nagin and the chocolate city reference throw you off, blacks and whites seem to get along virtually on the same level here. although unfortunately like in many other places, the black population still has their fare share of hard ships. i think many cities and states could take a page out of new orleans in terms of race relations tho. it is second only to nyc imo. it's too bad mississippi though is still so far behind.
I find while not as good as black/white relations in the city that hispanic relations with other races are good with the exception of Mexicans. Mexicans are relatively new and their sudden increase in numbers is a direct result of the post-K landscape. With that said Mexicans here are despised, but the Central and South American hispanic population that has been here for generations are pretty much accepted. Either way it's much better than Mississippi.

------------------------------

I noticed that in the Jackson area that outside of work and maybe school, the different racial groups interact with each other very little.
 
Old 05-14-2010, 07:49 PM
 
295 posts, read 257,421 times
Reputation: 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by JacksonPanther View Post
This state has a terrible reputation when it comes to race, because they EARNED it. This state let it be known that if you get out of line, you will be killed (see, Emmett Till, and the Freedom Riders). This state let it be known that "they" will not gain access to "our" public schools, without a fight (see Governor Ross Barnett).
In 1953, public schools were just fine for White kids, but by 1955, public schools were not good enough for "us" and are only for "them," and white kids suddenly attended the dozens of new "academies" that suddenly sprang up. You tell me what happened in 1954.

Mississippi's reputation is well-deserved. Don't blame it on the media, movies, books, or ignorant people. We all need to OWN it.
Mississippi stands as one of the most INTEGRATED SOUTHERN STATES, thank you for the so called freedom riders and our jewish brothers who came here in droves in the 1960's but seeing how BLACKS now have their own representation and can FREELY SEPERATE themselves from WHITE AMERICA and nobody cries FOUL PLAY or that little RACE CARD!

Honestly, *********, you are not en-slaved by anyone but your own poisoned media mind!!!
 
Old 05-14-2010, 08:01 PM
 
295 posts, read 257,421 times
Reputation: 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by NWS View Post
1979 please don't come here and try to rewrite history and blame it on Thurgood Marshall.
Blacks in the segregated South did not have "separate but equal" schools.
If you have read anything and I mean anything about the Brown vs Board of education case you would know that.

Brown vs. Board of Education - Background Summary (http://brownvboard.org/summary/ - broken link)

The decision was based on 5 cases brought before the court from 5 states.

Delaware – Belton v. Gebhart (Bulah v. Gebhart)

First petitioned in 1951, these local cases challenged the inferior conditions of two black schools designated for African American children.
In the suburb of Claymont, African American children were prohibited from attending the area’s local high school.
Instead, they had to ride a school bus for nearly an hour to attend Howard High School in Wilmington. Located in an industrial area of the state’s capital city,
Howard High School also suffered from a deficient curriculum, pupil-teacher ratio, teacher training, extra curricular activities program, and physical plant.
In the rural community of Hockessin, African American students were forced to attend a dilapidated one-room school house and were not provided transportation to the school,
while white children in the area were provided transportation and a better school facility....

Kansas – Brown v. Board of Education
In 1950 ...The local NAACP assembled a group of 13 parents who agreed to be plaintiffs on behalf of their 20 children.
Following direction from legal counsel they attempted to enroll their children in segregated white schools and all were denied.
Topeka operated eighteen neighborhood schools for white children, while African American children had access to only four schools.

South Carolina - Briggs v. Elliot

...The Court found that the schools designated for African Americans were grossly inadequate in terms of buildings,
transportation and teacher’s salaries when compared to the schools provided for whites.
An order to equalize the facilities was virtually ignored by school officials and the schools were never made equal. ...

Virginia – Davis v. County School Board of Prince Edward County

One of the few public high schools available to African Americans in the state was Robert Moton High School in Prince Edward County.
Built in 1943, it was never large enough to accommodate its student population. Eventually hastily constructed tar paper covered buildings were added as classrooms. ...
Although the U.S. District Court ordered that the plaintiffs be provided with equal school facilities, they were denied access to the white schools in their area.

Washington, DC – Bolling v. C. Melvin Sharpe

Eleven African American junior High School students were taken on a field trip to the cities new modern John Phillip Sousa school for whites only.
Accompanied by local activist Gardner Bishop, who requested admittance for the students and was denied,
the African American students were ordered to return to their grossly inadequate school. A suit was filed on their behalf in 1951.
After review with the Brown case in 1954, the Supreme Court ruled "segregation in the District of Columbia public schools…is a denial of the due process of law guaranteed by the Fifth Amendment…"


1979 If Blacks had been given the same quality of schools, books, teachers and funding we probably wouldn't be have this discussion and this country would be in a better place today.
Are you joking? Are you joking?? Are you kidding me!!!
I think in 1979 all BLACK AMERICA had their rights!
The schools, I see Black kids wearing jewelry-MTV style, I won't go GANGSTER related, cell phones are very popular but that to say this country would be in a better place...GET LOST!

Most all Black schools require medal detectors and security guards...sounds alot like PRISON TO THIS WHITE MAN!!!
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