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Old 06-12-2010, 10:01 PM
 
4,805 posts, read 20,237,442 times
Reputation: 4972

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You're bothered after a mere two weeks? That's nothing. It would be a waste of time for an employer to accept applications for such a short period of time. They wouldn't get a decent sampling of applicants. Employers usually accept applications for longer, even in this economy.

And rarely outside of government jobs do openings have an actual 'closing date'. In the private sector, jobs are advertised until filled. That might be a month, that might be six months. It just depends on how urgent their need is, and how suitable their applicants are.

Don't assume that the letter you received explains any real reason for the situation. Employers generally use wording that allows them to send the same letter to every applicant for every position. And that fits every situation, whether they selected an internal applicant, or actually did hire someone else, or didn't hire at all, or changed their mind about what kind of person they wanted. They aren't under any obligation to you to give you the real reason, and ultimately it doesn't really matter why you didn't get the job. All that matters is that you didn't get it. Move on.
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Old 06-12-2010, 10:25 PM
 
577 posts, read 1,582,416 times
Reputation: 445
Actually I've been unemployed for 6 months, have sent in numerous resume's and done what you suggested..... nothing after applying. It hasnt worked so far so I'm asking would it hurt if I email or inquire again showing my interest in the job or is it a bad idea. Especially this one job, I really never thought I'd find a job that combined my past work experience with my lifelong passion which is helping animals. This job is at a non-profit, has a decent wage ( shocker) and is what I have majority of my corporate experience ( 20 years) in. So I'm just trying to make sure I stand out as the application process was generic. I'm looking for feedback from HR people if something like that
might push me to the yes pile instead of the maybe pile. Or I could sit here and wait and do nothing and hope that my application stands out on it's own. I keep being told "network, network, network" But how do you do that in this case??? In some ways this is a total career change as far as working for a non- profit vs corporate america. And no the job hasnt only been opened two weeks. It's been on the website for almost 2 months now, advertised on craigslist for a month.... I would think a non- profit cant go that long without this position being filled.. its not that big that they have a team of people doing this job.

As far as the letter I received for the other job...it was filled from within the company and they opened that person's job on the site the next day after I was contacted. I know many of you are bitter but I dont have any reason not to believe what they said. I'm just wondering if there is more I could be doing for some of these jobs that I have gotten response emails with names, emails, phone numbers instead of the normal generic "thanks for applying we'll contact you if interested and dont email us back. "
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Old 06-12-2010, 10:50 PM
FBJ
 
Location: Tall Building down by the river
39,615 posts, read 50,313,442 times
Reputation: 9451
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jasmine728 View Post
Actually I've been unemployed for 6 months, have sent in numerous resume's and done what you suggested..... nothing after applying. It hasnt worked so far so I'm asking would it hurt if I email or inquire again showing my interest in the job or is it a bad idea. Especially this one job, I really never thought I'd find a job that combined my past work experience with my lifelong passion which is helping animals. This job is at a non-profit, has a decent wage ( shocker) and is what I have majority of my corporate experience ( 20 years) in. So I'm just trying to make sure I stand out as the application process was generic. I'm looking for feedback from HR people if something like that
might push me to the yes pile instead of the maybe pile. Or I could sit here and wait and do nothing and hope that my application stands out on it's own. I keep being told "network, network, network" But how do you do that in this case??? In some ways this is a total career change as far as working for a non- profit vs corporate america. And no the job hasnt only been opened two weeks. It's been on the website for almost 2 months now, advertised on craigslist for a month.... I would think a non- profit cant go that long without this position being filled.. its not that big that they have a team of people doing this job.

As far as the letter I received for the other job...it was filled from within the company and they opened that person's job on the site the next day after I was contacted. I know many of you are bitter but I dont have any reason not to believe what they said. I'm just wondering if there is more I could be doing for some of these jobs that I have gotten response emails with names, emails, phone numbers instead of the normal generic "thanks for applying we'll contact you if interested and dont email us back. "

Like kodaka said, just keep applying and move on. No need in wasting enegry in contacting a place about a application you submitted because if there was actually a opening you don't come off as attractive candidate. There was jobs I was a perfect fit for when I applied and when I didn't hear anything back I just said-"Oh well" I told myself constantly-"just because I'm unemployed and need a job I'm not going to give off that vibe" I started having the attitude that-"they have my information and know how to reach me if they want to schedule a interview"

So just keeping applying and also get a note pad where you put down all the applications you submitted so you can track your progress from week to week and month to month.

Another suggestion is create a new resume every 4-5 weeks and sent it to a company you know you don't want to work for because of the distance. Then if you get a response, you know you can start sending it companies that are closer in distance.
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Old 06-12-2010, 10:55 PM
 
4,805 posts, read 20,237,442 times
Reputation: 4972
Networking is never about 'this case', regardless of what this case is. Networking is about meeting other working professionals and maintaining connections with them. You maintain these connections even if there isn't immediate value, because some day there may be value in the connection. It's a long-term investment and you never know exactly what the payoff is going to be. Its not something you do for a specific job.

Yes, many businesses can go two months without filling a position. Many businesses can go a year or more without filling the position.

Its pretty cheeky to call other people bitter, when you are the one complaining about the situation and all everyone is trying to do is offer you the insight you asked for. That you don't like the answers you receive doesn't mean the problem is with other people.
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Old 06-12-2010, 11:17 PM
 
577 posts, read 1,582,416 times
Reputation: 445
But I'm not complaining about the situation.. just the lack of knowing how to proceed in this internet world. In the past if I applied to a job in person before all the internet searching... I would follow up to applications I submitted , in person. And yes it did help to get the job as sometimes they were inundated and just that personal touch made you stand out. Companies want to know you are interested in the job and really want it and arent out sending out 50 resumes a week to every job possible just because you need a job. Also I am applying nationwide, have gotten lots of feedback on my resume from people in the industry that it is good , so I'm not worried about that.. just that it actually gets looked at in the piles of resumes that HR depts get these days.

But hey thanks for the feedback, I guess I was looking for something more specific or an actual HR person to respond with their experience on the process.
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Old 06-12-2010, 11:42 PM
 
577 posts, read 1,582,416 times
Reputation: 445
Quote:
Originally Posted by kodaka View Post
You're bothered after a mere two weeks? That's nothing. It would be a waste of time for an employer to accept applications for such a short period of time. They wouldn't get a decent sampling of applicants. Employers usually accept applications for longer, even in this economy.

And rarely outside of government jobs do openings have an actual 'closing date'. In the private sector, jobs are advertised until filled. That might be a month, that might be six months. It just depends on how urgent their need is, and how suitable their applicants are.

Don't assume that the letter you received explains any real reason for the situation. Employers generally use wording that allows them to send the same letter to every applicant for every position. And that fits every situation, whether they selected an internal applicant, or actually did hire someone else, or didn't hire at all, or changed their mind about what kind of person they wanted. They aren't under any obligation to you to give you the real reason, and ultimately it doesn't really matter why you didn't get the job. All that matters is that you didn't get it. Move on.
This response didnt address my original question. And basically your tone was that I was ridiculous to even consider doing anything more. ( with the "mere two weeks" comment) I dont care why that first job didnt hire me.. nor did I say they are under any obligation to me. I have moved on and am just trying to make sure I'm doing everything possible for future submittals. I was just giving an example.
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Old 06-13-2010, 01:23 AM
 
Location: The Chatterdome in La La Land, CaliFUNia
38,866 posts, read 20,168,923 times
Reputation: 35904
I personally don't see anything wrong with following up with a phone call unless they specifically stated no phone calls. Could not hurt.
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Old 06-13-2010, 10:28 AM
FBJ
 
Location: Tall Building down by the river
39,615 posts, read 50,313,442 times
Reputation: 9451
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chatteress View Post
I personally don't see anything wrong with following up with a phone call unless they specifically stated no phone calls. Could not hurt.
Calling to say what? "Did you get my resume?
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Old 06-13-2010, 10:38 AM
 
6,585 posts, read 22,868,840 times
Reputation: 3199
Since it's a non-profit there may be funding issues that have come up and also if this is a career change for you, well....that's just hard to do in this job environment. They may also not be interesting in someone from the corporate world. Sometimes it's hard to move between non-profit, private and govt work.
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Old 06-13-2010, 12:40 PM
 
274 posts, read 909,674 times
Reputation: 152
jasmine728, i can tell you from personal experience that when you apply online, most times your resume is submitted into a huge pool of applications that will be screened out - either by automated systems using keywords or by HR. however, the timelines for responses drastically vary per company and the volume of applications they receive.

for instance, i applied to a job online and didn't do any followup and received a call about a month and half later... i figured that i was overlooked so i didn't even bother to followup. but in your case, if it's a job you really want, i'd followup after a week or so with an email (if you can find one on the website) so as long as there aren't any explicit directions on the posting saying not to.

i believe that for most employers, they do contact you eventually if you are qualified and passed the initial screening process. it just takes time unfortunately and there's no set algorithm to figure that out, just as what happened for me. your resume needs to be catered very specifically to the job posting in order to even be considered nowadays otherwise it'd be thrown into the trash - however, many people still insist on sending generic resumes.
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