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Old 06-13-2010, 12:23 PM
 
274 posts, read 909,237 times
Reputation: 152

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so all of us jobseekers know the following when it comes to a job search for most employers:
  • the goal of a resume is to get you an interview
  • the goal of an initial interview is to get you to go onsite for a second interview
  • the goal of a second (or subsequent) interview is to familiarize yourself with the company culture and for the other managers/interviewers to decide whether you'd be a good fit for the company. it is then when they decide whether they would want to move forward to offer you a position or not.
that said, i will share with all of you some tips and suggestions i have used to prepare for a second interview to get an offer. i sincerely hope that this serves as a valuable tool for everyone trying to get a leg up in this 'rat race' and get that job they've been wanting. i guess you can say these are my secrets

1. RESEARCH

it is an expectation that once you get a call to visit the company for a second interview that you would learn AS MUCH as you can about the company as well as the role you're applying for.

if the company has a website, go to it. jot down notes on the key aspects of what they do, including their mission/vision. gather information on their current clients or customers. research any company recognition and/or awards they've received recently, to include whether or not they've been featured in any magazine like fortune or businessweek.

LEARN about the industry that it's in. understand and be able to speak about any industry trends and latest news out there. is it volatile? is it stable? any new gadgets coming out soon or business practices emerging?

look the company up on glassdoor.com. this is a website that gives you a very superficial idea of what the employees are saying about that company. don't take everything for granted because understand typically only disgruntled employees post stuff there. use this info to figure what commonalities are between what people are saying.

if this information is available, LEARN the backgrounds of your potential interviewers if you know who they would be. LinkedIn provides a great history most times and if not, use google to see if you can find them there. find out of any hobbies or awards they may have received... keep this noted somewhere for your informational sake for your interview.

get multiple copies of your resume before you show up on site. bring along a list of references as well in case you have to formally fill out an employment application.

KNOW your resume inside and out. EVERY single bullet statement. resume bullets serve as "talking points" just like bullets on a powerpoint slide. you should be able to speak to anything on there, especially any quantitative impact. be able to elaborate as well... the last thing you want to happen during an interview is for you to be stumped on your own interview - that'd definitely be deal breaker.

generate a list of questions you would ask to your interviewer(s), as they pertain to your job. refrain from the common questions as best as you can because they've probably heard them over and over again. instead, try using what you learned (or discovered) during your research and ask those specific kinds of questions versus the generic ones.

sometimes during a second interview, an offer may be presented on the spot. in order to negociate salary/benefits properly, check out salary.com to see what the general range of salary is for the position you're applying for, in the location where the job is too. understand that even though a BASE salary may be somewhat lower than what you expected, other factors play into the 'overall' salary like healthcare benefits, 401K match, vacation time, flex time, tuition assistance, relocation assistance, and bonus potential. look LONG TERM and refrain from seeing the opportunity from a small snapshot.

2. INTERVIEW

second interviews typically are more intense than your initial (screener) interviews. when you walk into a conference room or an office of a manager, always smile and give a firm handshake.

make 'small talk' with the interviewer by showing to them that you know them a little bit before the interview. not only does this break the ice, but it shows that you've spent the time to learn about their background. most times, this will catch them off guard in a good way

expect a lot of behavorial type questions and be able to provide concrete examples for your most common questions, as they relate to your experiences. the more relevant and specific the examples, the better it will be.

always lean forward in your chair when you're sitting down. that shows not only you're listening, but you're also showing interest/enthusiasm to the interviewer. also, maintain eye contact at all times when you're talking with the interviewer.

use hand gestures to emphasize some points you feel passionate about. again, this shows enthusiasm but don't overdo it as if you're doing karate in the air

"tell me about yourself" questions are very common and there are A LOT of variations of this question. expect these but in spite of how awesome you may be interviewers do not care about your life story. prepare in advance for this question to show the interviewer how either from your personal passion/interest or experiences have shifted your radar to this company as they relate to the job.

show enthusiasm when you talk... i cannot emphasize this enough. if you sounded like you're down and miserable, why would that interviewer even remotely want to hire you when they have a huge applicant pool to pick from? i know it's nerve racking in any interview but here you NEED to shine. your tone of voice needs to inflect that you're really passionate about that particular company versus any ol' job. that goes a long way, trust me.

usually toward the end of the interview, the interviewer asks if you have any questions for them. ALWAYS ask questions... use the list you generated. as i mentioned, the more specific the question surrounding the company the better you sound and the more it shows that you've done a crapload of research/preparation for the interview.

always ask what the next step in moving forward. this will give you a timeline of what the decision process will be. most times, employers understand your obvious desire to know and will tell you. however, other times you may just get the generic answer of "we'll contact you" or "we'll let you know".

if you do happen to get an offer on the spot, first thank them!!!! then stay calm and ask if you could have several days to think about it because you want make sure that after all the information you just digested fits with you and what YOU want to do.

3. FOLLOW UP

get business cards and email addys from everyone you interacted with before you leave... including the HR/secretary that set up the logistics behind the interview.

personally HAND-WRITE thank you letters to everyone you've interviewed with. also, include some topics that you discussed and reemphasize that you'd be a good fit for the company. this gives a personal touch to your interviewers versus an email. thank you emails will suffice IF the decision was going to be made very soon.

----------------------

whew! that was a lot but i hope these tips help out. this should give most of you a competitive edge because i can guarantee that most other jobseekers don't do these things and unknowingly shortchange their chances of getting an offer.

doing this preparation not only landed me a job, but it sat well with me because it is a job that i am very passionate about and interested in. in addition, it's a great feeling to know that my efforts paid off. i'm confident that all of you will get there!

even though all of us jobseekers essentially are in this 'rat race', there ARE opportunities out there and it IS possible to get them. as i keep saying, it's all in the mindset and attitude. if you're self-defeated, then you're self-defeated. if you fall 7 times, but stand up 8, you're on your path to success.

good luck to all!!! if anyone has any additional questions please comment or PM me. i'd be more than happy to help out!
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Old 06-13-2010, 03:26 PM
FBJ
 
Location: Tall Building down by the river
39,615 posts, read 50,276,243 times
Reputation: 9451
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rutt Roh View Post
so all of us jobseekers know the following when it comes to a job search for most employers:
  • the goal of a resume is to get you an interview
  • the goal of an initial interview is to get you to go onsite for a second interview
  • the goal of a second (or subsequent) interview is to familiarize yourself with the company culture and for the other managers/interviewers to decide whether you'd be a good fit for the company. it is then when they decide whether they would want to move forward to offer you a position or not.
that said, i will share with all of you some tips and suggestions i have used to prepare for a second interview to get an offer. i sincerely hope that this serves as a valuable tool for everyone trying to get a leg up in this 'rat race' and get that job they've been wanting. i guess you can say these are my secrets

1. RESEARCH

it is an expectation that once you get a call to visit the company for a second interview that you would learn AS MUCH as you can about the company as well as the role you're applying for.

if the company has a website, go to it. jot down notes on the key aspects of what they do, including their mission/vision. gather information on their current clients or customers. research any company recognition and/or awards they've received recently, to include whether or not they've been featured in any magazine like fortune or businessweek.

LEARN about the industry that it's in. understand and be able to speak about any industry trends and latest news out there. is it volatile? is it stable? any new gadgets coming out soon or business practices emerging?

look the company up on glassdoor.com. this is a website that gives you a very superficial idea of what the employees are saying about that company. don't take everything for granted because understand typically only disgruntled employees post stuff there. use this info to figure what commonalities are between what people are saying.

if this information is available, LEARN the backgrounds of your potential interviewers if you know who they would be. LinkedIn provides a great history most times and if not, use google to see if you can find them there. find out of any hobbies or awards they may have received... keep this noted somewhere for your informational sake for your interview.

get multiple copies of your resume before you show up on site. bring along a list of references as well in case you have to formally fill out an employment application.

KNOW your resume inside and out. EVERY single bullet statement. resume bullets serve as "talking points" just like bullets on a powerpoint slide. you should be able to speak to anything on there, especially any quantitative impact. be able to elaborate as well... the last thing you want to happen during an interview is for you to be stumped on your own interview - that'd definitely be deal breaker.

generate a list of questions you would ask to your interviewer(s), as they pertain to your job. refrain from the common questions as best as you can because they've probably heard them over and over again. instead, try using what you learned (or discovered) during your research and ask those specific kinds of questions versus the generic ones.

sometimes during a second interview, an offer may be presented on the spot. in order to negociate salary/benefits properly, check out salary.com to see what the general range of salary is for the position you're applying for, in the location where the job is too. understand that even though a BASE salary may be somewhat lower than what you expected, other factors play into the 'overall' salary like healthcare benefits, 401K match, vacation time, flex time, tuition assistance, relocation assistance, and bonus potential. look LONG TERM and refrain from seeing the opportunity from a small snapshot.

2. INTERVIEW

second interviews typically are more intense than your initial (screener) interviews. when you walk into a conference room or an office of a manager, always smile and give a firm handshake.

make 'small talk' with the interviewer by showing to them that you know them a little bit before the interview. not only does this break the ice, but it shows that you've spent the time to learn about their background. most times, this will catch them off guard in a good way

expect a lot of behavorial type questions and be able to provide concrete examples for your most common questions, as they relate to your experiences. the more relevant and specific the examples, the better it will be.

always lean forward in your chair when you're sitting down. that shows not only you're listening, but you're also showing interest/enthusiasm to the interviewer. also, maintain eye contact at all times when you're talking with the interviewer.

use hand gestures to emphasize some points you feel passionate about. again, this shows enthusiasm but don't overdo it as if you're doing karate in the air

"tell me about yourself" questions are very common and there are A LOT of variations of this question. expect these but in spite of how awesome you may be interviewers do not care about your life story. prepare in advance for this question to show the interviewer how either from your personal passion/interest or experiences have shifted your radar to this company as they relate to the job.

show enthusiasm when you talk... i cannot emphasize this enough. if you sounded like you're down and miserable, why would that interviewer even remotely want to hire you when they have a huge applicant pool to pick from? i know it's nerve racking in any interview but here you NEED to shine. your tone of voice needs to inflect that you're really passionate about that particular company versus any ol' job. that goes a long way, trust me.

usually toward the end of the interview, the interviewer asks if you have any questions for them. ALWAYS ask questions... use the list you generated. as i mentioned, the more specific the question surrounding the company the better you sound and the more it shows that you've done a crapload of research/preparation for the interview.

always ask what the next step in moving forward. this will give you a timeline of what the decision process will be. most times, employers understand your obvious desire to know and will tell you. however, other times you may just get the generic answer of "we'll contact you" or "we'll let you know".

if you do happen to get an offer on the spot, first thank them!!!! then stay calm and ask if you could have several days to think about it because you want make sure that after all the information you just digested fits with you and what YOU want to do.

3. FOLLOW UP

get business cards and email addys from everyone you interacted with before you leave... including the HR/secretary that set up the logistics behind the interview.

personally HAND-WRITE thank you letters to everyone you've interviewed with. also, include some topics that you discussed and reemphasize that you'd be a good fit for the company. this gives a personal touch to your interviewers versus an email. thank you emails will suffice IF the decision was going to be made very soon.

----------------------

whew! that was a lot but i hope these tips help out. this should give most of you a competitive edge because i can guarantee that most other jobseekers don't do these things and unknowingly shortchange their chances of getting an offer.

doing this preparation not only landed me a job, but it sat well with me because it is a job that i am very passionate about and interested in. in addition, it's a great feeling to know that my efforts paid off. i'm confident that all of you will get there!

even though all of us jobseekers essentially are in this 'rat race', there ARE opportunities out there and it IS possible to get them. as i keep saying, it's all in the mindset and attitude. if you're self-defeated, then you're self-defeated. if you fall 7 times, but stand up 8, you're on your path to success.

good luck to all!!! if anyone has any additional questions please comment or PM me. i'd be more than happy to help out!

Why are these tips being lableded as your secrets?-lol

I seen these same tips everywhere on the web
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Old 06-13-2010, 06:49 PM
 
Location: The Chatterdome in La La Land, CaliFUNia
38,854 posts, read 20,157,720 times
Reputation: 35901
Quote:
Originally Posted by TVandSportsGuy View Post
Why are these tips being lableded as your secrets?-lol

I seen these same tips everywhere on the web
Do you have anything of value to contribute, Mr. Fruit Loops?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-13-2010, 06:51 PM
 
Location: The Chatterdome in La La Land, CaliFUNia
38,854 posts, read 20,157,720 times
Reputation: 35901
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rutt Roh View Post
so all of us jobseekers know the following when it comes to a job search for most employers:
  • the goal of a resume is to get you an interview
  • the goal of an initial interview is to get you to go onsite for a second interview
  • the goal of a second (or subsequent) interview is to familiarize yourself with the company culture and for the other managers/interviewers to decide whether you'd be a good fit for the company. it is then when they decide whether they would want to move forward to offer you a position or not.
that said, i will share with all of you some tips and suggestions i have used to prepare for a second interview to get an offer. i sincerely hope that this serves as a valuable tool for everyone trying to get a leg up in this 'rat race' and get that job they've been wanting. i guess you can say these are my secrets

1. RESEARCH

it is an expectation that once you get a call to visit the company for a second interview that you would learn AS MUCH as you can about the company as well as the role you're applying for.

if the company has a website, go to it. jot down notes on the key aspects of what they do, including their mission/vision. gather information on their current clients or customers. research any company recognition and/or awards they've received recently, to include whether or not they've been featured in any magazine like fortune or businessweek.

LEARN about the industry that it's in. understand and be able to speak about any industry trends and latest news out there. is it volatile? is it stable? any new gadgets coming out soon or business practices emerging?

look the company up on glassdoor.com. this is a website that gives you a very superficial idea of what the employees are saying about that company. don't take everything for granted because understand typically only disgruntled employees post stuff there. use this info to figure what commonalities are between what people are saying.

if this information is available, LEARN the backgrounds of your potential interviewers if you know who they would be. LinkedIn provides a great history most times and if not, use google to see if you can find them there. find out of any hobbies or awards they may have received... keep this noted somewhere for your informational sake for your interview.

get multiple copies of your resume before you show up on site. bring along a list of references as well in case you have to formally fill out an employment application.

KNOW your resume inside and out. EVERY single bullet statement. resume bullets serve as "talking points" just like bullets on a powerpoint slide. you should be able to speak to anything on there, especially any quantitative impact. be able to elaborate as well... the last thing you want to happen during an interview is for you to be stumped on your own interview - that'd definitely be deal breaker.

generate a list of questions you would ask to your interviewer(s), as they pertain to your job. refrain from the common questions as best as you can because they've probably heard them over and over again. instead, try using what you learned (or discovered) during your research and ask those specific kinds of questions versus the generic ones.

sometimes during a second interview, an offer may be presented on the spot. in order to negociate salary/benefits properly, check out salary.com to see what the general range of salary is for the position you're applying for, in the location where the job is too. understand that even though a BASE salary may be somewhat lower than what you expected, other factors play into the 'overall' salary like healthcare benefits, 401K match, vacation time, flex time, tuition assistance, relocation assistance, and bonus potential. look LONG TERM and refrain from seeing the opportunity from a small snapshot.

2. INTERVIEW

second interviews typically are more intense than your initial (screener) interviews. when you walk into a conference room or an office of a manager, always smile and give a firm handshake.

make 'small talk' with the interviewer by showing to them that you know them a little bit before the interview. not only does this break the ice, but it shows that you've spent the time to learn about their background. most times, this will catch them off guard in a good way

expect a lot of behavorial type questions and be able to provide concrete examples for your most common questions, as they relate to your experiences. the more relevant and specific the examples, the better it will be.

always lean forward in your chair when you're sitting down. that shows not only you're listening, but you're also showing interest/enthusiasm to the interviewer. also, maintain eye contact at all times when you're talking with the interviewer.

use hand gestures to emphasize some points you feel passionate about. again, this shows enthusiasm but don't overdo it as if you're doing karate in the air

"tell me about yourself" questions are very common and there are A LOT of variations of this question. expect these but in spite of how awesome you may be interviewers do not care about your life story. prepare in advance for this question to show the interviewer how either from your personal passion/interest or experiences have shifted your radar to this company as they relate to the job.

show enthusiasm when you talk... i cannot emphasize this enough. if you sounded like you're down and miserable, why would that interviewer even remotely want to hire you when they have a huge applicant pool to pick from? i know it's nerve racking in any interview but here you NEED to shine. your tone of voice needs to inflect that you're really passionate about that particular company versus any ol' job. that goes a long way, trust me.

usually toward the end of the interview, the interviewer asks if you have any questions for them. ALWAYS ask questions... use the list you generated. as i mentioned, the more specific the question surrounding the company the better you sound and the more it shows that you've done a crapload of research/preparation for the interview.

always ask what the next step in moving forward. this will give you a timeline of what the decision process will be. most times, employers understand your obvious desire to know and will tell you. however, other times you may just get the generic answer of "we'll contact you" or "we'll let you know".

if you do happen to get an offer on the spot, first thank them!!!! then stay calm and ask if you could have several days to think about it because you want make sure that after all the information you just digested fits with you and what YOU want to do.

3. FOLLOW UP

get business cards and email addys from everyone you interacted with before you leave... including the HR/secretary that set up the logistics behind the interview.

personally HAND-WRITE thank you letters to everyone you've interviewed with. also, include some topics that you discussed and reemphasize that you'd be a good fit for the company. this gives a personal touch to your interviewers versus an email. thank you emails will suffice IF the decision was going to be made very soon.

----------------------

whew! that was a lot but i hope these tips help out. this should give most of you a competitive edge because i can guarantee that most other jobseekers don't do these things and unknowingly shortchange their chances of getting an offer.

doing this preparation not only landed me a job, but it sat well with me because it is a job that i am very passionate about and interested in. in addition, it's a great feeling to know that my efforts paid off. i'm confident that all of you will get there!

even though all of us jobseekers essentially are in this 'rat race', there ARE opportunities out there and it IS possible to get them. as i keep saying, it's all in the mindset and attitude. if you're self-defeated, then you're self-defeated. if you fall 7 times, but stand up 8, you're on your path to success.

good luck to all!!! if anyone has any additional questions please comment or PM me. i'd be more than happy to help out!
I wanted to rep you but have to pass the love around. Excellent tips and timely as I have a follow-up interview on Tuesday. Regarding the small talk, how would you incorporate that into an interview with 2-3 interviewers?
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Old 06-13-2010, 07:00 PM
FBJ
 
Location: Tall Building down by the river
39,615 posts, read 50,276,243 times
Reputation: 9451
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chatteress View Post
I wanted to rep you but have to pass the love around. Excellent tips and timely as I have a follow-up interview on Tuesday. Regarding the small talk, how would you incorporate that into an interview with 2-3 interviewers?

On your next interview show a lot of interest in the opinions and feelings of the interviewer about the company. I got 3 job offers doing this in one month
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Old 06-13-2010, 07:02 PM
 
274 posts, read 909,237 times
Reputation: 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chatteress View Post
I wanted to rep you but have to pass the love around. Excellent tips and timely as I have a follow-up interview on Tuesday. Regarding the small talk, how would you incorporate that into an interview with 2-3 interviewers?
you're having multiple interviewers in one session? that changes the situation a little bit differently since my tip was geared for a 1-on-1 interview. even so, i would assume that you'd have some time after the interview where they ask if you have any questions for them.

in addition to questions about the job and company, i would ask them random stuff about themselves. maybe someone published an article in a magazine. perhaps someone won an award somewhere. or maybe they have extensive experience and/or background for the role you're applying for.

by the way, congrats on a follow-up interview! and good luck!
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Old 06-13-2010, 07:09 PM
 
Location: Spokane via Sydney,Australia
6,611 posts, read 11,294,908 times
Reputation: 3097
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chatteress View Post
Do you have anything of value to contribute, Mr. Fruit Loops?
You beat me to it lol
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Old 06-13-2010, 07:16 PM
 
577 posts, read 1,581,725 times
Reputation: 445
Nice tips Rutt Ro ( I love your name btw ) Thanks for posting something positive and helpful on here! I've seen some of this but not all of it and not in such a user friendly personal format
And we know it worked for you!

As Chatteress said, a lot of interviews are panel type with more than one interview so some things may need to be adjusted a little . I was even on one interview for the federal government that had 4 panelists and 3 of us being interviewed at the SAME TIME. that was a bit nervewracking because you are constantly comparing their answer with yours or trying to come up with something much different than what the others said because the questions were generic LOL That was the quite an experience. I prefer the one on one even if I have to meet with 4 different people on the same day and then they compare notes. But they are the ones to decide how they do it and you take what you get. Thanks again!
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Old 06-13-2010, 07:17 PM
 
577 posts, read 1,581,725 times
Reputation: 445
Quote:
Originally Posted by Opyelie View Post
You beat me to it lol

yea me too... although amazingly he contributed something positive his next post... I almost fainted and had to go back and see if it was really his handle that posted....
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Old 06-13-2010, 07:18 PM
 
577 posts, read 1,581,725 times
Reputation: 445
Quote:
Originally Posted by TVandSportsGuy View Post
On your next interview show a lot of interest in the opinions and feelings of the interviewer about the company. I got 3 job offers doing this in one month
Why do you think this is what prompted the offers??? Just curious how you would know?
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