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Old 06-16-2010, 10:04 PM
 
Location: Camberville
12,030 posts, read 16,771,078 times
Reputation: 19763

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Two separate situations, I'd appreciate some advice.

1. I interviewed about a month ago for a position at a local state university. Because the interviews were set a week before my graduation from an out of state college, the search committee offered me a phone interview. At the end of the interview, they discussed salary and asked me if I could start the next week. I thought I did well and promptly followed up with a thank you email to everyone I spoke with. I was told that I would be contacted regardless within a week.

At the end of the week, I sent a follow up email (I had specifically been told not to call since it was a busy time for the department- something I noted in the email) and got no response. I just passed off the whole thing as being a wash.

I recently found out from my "spy" (a friend who works at the university who referred me to the job) that the position is on hold for budget reasons.

How should I phrase another follow up email saying that I'm still interested? Should I say that I heard the job was on hold from the friend (a professor, not a staff member)? Since it's been a month, I don't want to seem pestering but since it appears that there might still be a chance, I want to put my best foot forward.



2. I had a wonderful phone interview for pretty much my ideal company. I have not heard back if I got a second interview, but the recruiter told me that I was one of the top candidates and to be ready to interview in person next week. Only problem: I am in Atlanta and the job is in Charleston. While I absolutely have no problem relocating on my own, getting there for an interview is going to be a huge financial strain. I'm trying to keep a few thousand set aside solely for moving purposes (downpayment for a car, apartment costs, having to buy some basic furniture, etc) and the minimum $300 cost to interview is really going to be a financial issue. I know $300 sounds like nothing but I'm a recent college grad living off of my meager savings and that makes a HUGE dent.

While I will find some way of swinging it if I have to, what is a tactful and appropriate way for asking if they will offer any reimbursement for the travel? Or at least seeing if I am in the top 2 to know that it's worth it to get there?
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Old 06-16-2010, 10:29 PM
 
Location: NJ
17,579 posts, read 39,776,585 times
Reputation: 16146
I wouldn't send anything to the first one. It's on hold. They know who you are. If the situation changes they still know who you are. If you do send an email absolutely do not mention the position being on hold. That is information you should not have even had in the first place.

For the second one, what exactly is your plan? Very few jobs will not want to see you in person and not many will offer to pay your expenses. Personally I wouldn't ask either of those questions. You may as well stop applying to jobs far away if you can't swing the cost of travel for the interview.
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Old 06-16-2010, 10:52 PM
 
Location: Upland, CA
3,664 posts, read 6,487,596 times
Reputation: 4161
Some places will fly you in. What field are you in?

Sometimes you have to spend money to make money. While it may be a strain, if you think its a great job and your "ideal company", then, you don't have much to lose. Just drive if you can, and find a decent hotel on the outskirts of town or in a suburb to save money. Or take a friend and make a road trip out of it.

I think you will regret more not spending the money, always thinking back to "what if I did" as opposed to spending it and not getting it. Just my two cents
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Old 06-16-2010, 11:33 PM
 
Location: The Chatterdome in La La Land, CaliFUNia
38,873 posts, read 20,168,923 times
Reputation: 35909
Quote:
Originally Posted by IonRedline08 View Post
Some places will fly you in. What field are you in?

Sometimes you have to spend money to make money. While it may be a strain, if you think its a great job and your "ideal company", then, you don't have much to lose. Just drive if you can, and find a decent hotel on the outskirts of town or in a suburb to save money. Or take a friend and make a road trip out of it.

I think you will regret more not spending the money, always thinking back to "what if I did" as opposed to spending it and not getting it. Just my two cents
Excellent advice. OP ... If this is your ideal position AND you are among the top candidates, I would think this would be worth your investment. If flying is too costly, look into driving, train or greyhound. Stay in a cheap hotel. I once had an interview that was an hour flight away ... I flew up and back home the same day which saved on hotel expenses. I don't know if that would be a feasible option for you.
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Old 06-16-2010, 11:38 PM
 
Location: Maryland not Murlin
8,193 posts, read 22,331,358 times
Reputation: 6158
Quote:
Originally Posted by charolastra00 View Post
How should I phrase another follow up email saying that I'm still interested? Should I say that I heard the job was on hold from the friend (a professor, not a staff member)? Since it's been a month, I don't want to seem pestering but since it appears that there might still be a chance, I want to put my best foot forward.
I would wait two or three weeks before sending another email, and, I would simply say I am still interested in the position, and thank them for giving me the consideration. I would not mention that 'I heard' that the position is on hold, nor would I use any redundant language (If the position is still open. Please respond with an answer either way. Etc.



For you second dilemma; you are not the first applicant to hear those words. Being a 'top' candidate can mean a lot, or it can mean nothing, but in general it means that your application did not go into the trash. Yet.

As for the 'be ready to interview next week', well, they could very well intend to interview you next week....or they could just be giving you the heads up that they may potentially call you in for an interview, you know, so you don't go camping or something and miss it.

If you do go out this interview, you may be reimbursed, and you may not be. Companies have no obligation to reimburse you the travel costs, at least not for the initial interview, but the general rule of etiquette is to reimburse top candidates when they come back for another round of interviews.

Keep in mind that if they do not reimburse you, you can deduct the travel expense on your tax return. Moving costs, too.

But....I wouldn't ask them. I would seek out other employees at this company and ask them...or seek out this info on the Internet.
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Old 06-17-2010, 07:04 AM
 
47,573 posts, read 60,644,318 times
Reputation: 22283
If the first position is on hold, that could be for months, it doesn't hurt to stay in contact but I'd try to find out when it might not be on hold -- if they anticipate a hiring freeze for months or just weeks. I don't see how it could hurt if you wrote to them saying you've heard the position is now on hold but it might be better to use your other sources to check on that.

As for the second job, I think if it's the ideal, you should do whatever it takes to get to an interview. If you drive you could even pack a tent and stay in a campground with a shower and all that and look fine for an interview. Doing that wouldn't cost much at all.
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Old 06-17-2010, 07:05 AM
 
141 posts, read 514,891 times
Reputation: 140
Most decent companies will reimburse you for reasonable travel expenses for an interview. I don't think flying yourself to an interview is a good idea as if you are 1 in 10 candidates and keep going to interviews you will really begin to put yourself in a financial hole. Also most companies that demand you show up in person with no travel reimbursements for a out of the region interview are not worth working for.
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Old 06-17-2010, 07:11 AM
 
47,573 posts, read 60,644,318 times
Reputation: 22283
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lou347 View Post
Most decent companies will reimburse you for reasonable travel expenses for an interview. I don't think flying yourself to an interview is a good idea as if you are 1 in 10 candidates and keep going to interviews you will really begin to put yourself in a financial hole. Also most companies that demand you show up in person with no travel reimbursements for a out of the region interview are not worth working for.
Paying for travel yourself would be essential in many situations today - although this is a university position so they would have large budgets for that kind of thing so I would guess you're right when it comes to this line of work.
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Old 06-17-2010, 07:41 AM
 
4,805 posts, read 20,239,591 times
Reputation: 4972
I would do nothing for #1. You are fortunate enough to have inside info that the other candidates don't have, but that doesn't change anything. You've already sent your thank you's and reiterated your interest. More followup isn't going to change the fact that the job is on hold.

For #2, you should have thought about this BEFORE you applied for the job. Its your responsibility to figure out how to get to the interview and how to get to the job if hired. Employers don't typically schedule interviews weeks in advance so you have to be willing to make last-minute travel arrangements, if you are going to apply for jobs outside of your area.

One way applicants typically mitigate their expenses are by applying for other jobs in that area, and hopefully scheduling more than one interview during the trip, thus increasing your chances that the expense of travel will pay off in the form of a job.

In this case since you are working with a recruiter you might talk to them and say you'd like a little advance notice to schedule your trip.
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Old 06-17-2010, 08:16 AM
 
Location: NJ
17,579 posts, read 39,776,585 times
Reputation: 16146
A lot of job listings will say if relocation costs are included. If it says no, I would extend that to include travel for interviews.
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