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Old 11-21-2010, 12:06 PM
 
8,680 posts, read 13,307,850 times
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NR, I'd say you were pretty thorough in both screening applicants and explaining what you expected of them. They knew going into it what to expect and why--and the "why" is important. That's not crazy. That's sincere.
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Old 11-21-2010, 04:53 PM
FBJ
 
Location: Tall Building down by the river
39,615 posts, read 50,329,545 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boxerlady View Post
I mean you cant come out and ask, "Are you crazy?? Do you expect crazy things of your workers?" I have had such bad luck, not so much in finding a job but finding jobs that are not HORRIBLE enviroments. HELP!!
Unfortunely No, just dating you won't find out how they really are until you start working there. Like the boss at my last job was FRAUDULENT but i just wasn't going to find that out in the interview process.
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Old 11-21-2010, 05:02 PM
 
2,681 posts, read 6,270,460 times
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Lightbulb interesting info...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nite Ryder View Post
While I was in business, and did all the hiring, I don't think I ever had a potential employee that scrutinized my company like koaka apparently did the companies that gave her a chance with an interview. Usually I had less than thirty job applicants send letters and resumes. I read through them slowly, thanking all of them for contacting us and sending applications (with a stamped return mail envelop) to the ones I might be interested in. When I interviewed the first thing I did was give them a copy of an employee handbook, and ask them to read it and sign a form stating they had read it. Then I asked if they had questions. After answering questions I explained more about the job and the computer programs we used. One thing employees had to agree to was not sharing information about our company with friends, relatives or anyone, and that included the location of the building they worked in. They were allowed to take smoke breaks anytime they wanted, use a telephone anytime they wanted, watch TV, use a computer with games and internet access anytime they wanted, or read a book. The job consisted mainly of answering the telephone, typing notes into a computer, and dispatching emergency personell if and when needed. They were on probation for 6 months and employees that had worked two years or longer were given a sizable bonus, the amount depending on their years with our company. I suspect some people would think I was a crazy employer because I didn't want the location of our business publisized or to be common knowledge. The reason was because we were in operation 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Women who worked at night were there by themselves. I tried to make the job as safe as possible for them.

I would quickly realize that a potential employer not wanting to divulge the location of the company was probably 'hiding out' from the IRS or the law and that my safety, as an employee, was the least of their concerns. I think I'd be ending that interview rather quickly after pointing out 'that fact' to them. Some 'writings on the wall' are just to obvious to anyone.
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Old 11-21-2010, 05:40 PM
 
Location: Spokane via Sydney,Australia
6,611 posts, read 11,303,877 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nite Ryder View Post
I suspect some people would think I was a crazy employer because I didn't want the location of our business publisized or to be common knowledge. The reason was because we were in operation 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Women who worked at night were there by themselves. I tried to make the job as safe as possible for them.
I wouldn't have - when I was working pt nights as a check encoder the building was totally devoid of signage as it wasn't broadcast it was a payment processing facility. That went for two similar places - one for a bank and one for a central processing facility for the area credit unions.

Though we did have an "airlock" type security entrance for delivery and pickup.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Koale View Post
I would quickly realize that a potential employer not wanting to divulge the location of the company was probably 'hiding out' from the IRS or the law and that my safety, as an employee, was the least of their concerns. I think I'd be ending that interview rather quickly after pointing out 'that fact' to them. Some 'writings on the wall' are just to obvious to anyone.
cough cough - see above, sometimes the "obvious answer" is WRONG
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Old 11-21-2010, 06:23 PM
 
Location: Florida -
8,767 posts, read 10,851,233 times
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From what I've seen on unemployment and 99er threads, there are 100 people out there who would jump at the chance to work for even a "crazy employer," if they offered a reasonable job! ...and would work out the obstacles later. (There are always problems and 'crazy' people in every company).

Yet, it sounds here, like jobs are plentiful enough to pick-and-choose among many different employers(?) -- Don't misunderstand what I am saying, Anytime I looked for a new job (over 40-years), I always found several offers ... and was never out of work. I retired in 2008.

However, the message I'm getting from newspapers, blogs, unemployed people, etc. is that "there aren't any jobs!" --- What's the real deal? Are you folks just better employees with no problems in finding several jobs ... or is the unemployment situation not as bleak as presented?... or are you simply blaming lost jobs on 'crazy employers'?
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Old 11-21-2010, 06:30 PM
 
25,165 posts, read 48,435,427 times
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They always have crazy eyes (unless they've been crying, have allergies, or grave's disease.) Check out Ted Bundy's eyes in his head photos. If you see eyes like that combined with disorganization and a rough attitude then run for the hills. The office staff will also look a little off, too.
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Old 11-21-2010, 07:18 PM
 
4,100 posts, read 6,148,431 times
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Default How do you screen crazy employers?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Koale View Post
I would quickly realize that a potential employer not wanting to divulge the location of the company was probably 'hiding out' from the IRS or the law and that my safety, as an employee, was the least of their concerns. I think I'd be ending that interview rather quickly after pointing out 'that fact' to them. Some 'writings on the wall' are just to obvious to anyone.
I doubt that you would have had to worry about ending the interview rather quickly. I had my fair share of wierdos, drugies and alcoholics, I could spot people who think like you in a hurry. Like you say, some 'writings on the wall' are obvious, and most of those kind of people weren't ever interviewed. The police agencies all know me and knew where our office was, and that women worked there by themselves at night. All the 911 operators knew our office location and had particular instructions for dealing with emergencies at our office, should they arrise. Our employees safety was a major concern. Motion detectors surrounded the building to alert anyone inside to be watchful of what was going on outside. We also had a compete redundant office set up at another location so equipment could be switched off at one location and turned on at the other. We were equipped to handle just about any emergency that came up, either for our customers or in our own office area. My employees loved their job. Most all of my employees were older women who didn't have children at home. One of them held a full time job for another company, and had two children at home. She was allowed to bring them to work if she had a problem with a babysitter.
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Old 11-21-2010, 08:02 PM
 
Location: Shelby County
279 posts, read 878,152 times
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When I was considering moving into an apartment complex a few years ago, right before the tour, I walked around and talked to residents I saw outside. I asked them about the management and how quickly things were fixed, among other things.

Maybe you could do that at the workplace?

Just be sure you aren't asking the management.
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Old 11-21-2010, 08:45 PM
 
2,681 posts, read 6,270,460 times
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Wink I see...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nite Ryder View Post
I doubt that you would have had to worry about ending the interview rather quickly. I had my fair share of wierdos, drugies and alcoholics, I could spot people who think like you in a hurry. Like you say, some 'writings on the wall' are obvious, and most of those kind of people weren't ever interviewed. The police agencies all know me and knew where our office was, and that women worked there by themselves at night. All the 911 operators knew our office location and had particular instructions for dealing with emergencies at our office, should they arrise. Our employees safety was a major concern. Motion detectors surrounded the building to alert anyone inside to be watchful of what was going on outside. We also had a compete redundant office set up at another location so equipment could be switched off at one location and turned on at the other. We were equipped to handle just about any emergency that came up, either for our customers or in our own office area. My employees loved their job. Most all of my employees were older women who didn't have children at home. One of them held a full time job for another company, and had two children at home. She was allowed to bring them to work if she had a problem with a babysitter.
But, man, they thought Mt. St. Helens blew alot of hot air. I'm sure 911 did know exactly where you were located and how to handle emergencies associated w/your business, they probably kept a very close eye on your operation...ha...
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Old 11-21-2010, 09:02 PM
 
935 posts, read 2,191,310 times
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I think one thing you should do is make sure you are interviewed by the person who you will be working for or at least get the chance to sit down and have a conversation with the person before you sign any contracts. For one job, I was interviewed by a very sweet lady who I thought would be my boss. She gave me the title of corporate trainer, an offer of $11 an hour, and told me to come in the next day to sign the final contract.

The next day, I had to go in a few hours early b/c my ride had to go to work early. I waited patiently outside and the VP of the building smiled and let me in. I waited in the lobby until this lady walked up to me and asked me what I wanted. I told her I was here to meet with the lady I was talking to yesterday and she went berserk!!! She screamed, "YOU CAN'T BE HERE! WHAT ARE YOU DOING HERE?! YOU'RE EARLY! YOU SHOULDN'T BE HERE!!! SHE WON'T BE HERE FOR TWO HOURS!!!"

I was thinking "WTF?" while trying to calm her down. When she finally calmed down, she developed a snooty attitude and said, "Well, I can let you at least look at your contract." She handed it to me and said, "You will be a call center trainer and work for $1520 (about $9.50 an hour) salary. No overtime. Also, you are not allowed to have a cell phone unless you are the vice president or me because we're important, of course. Look at your shoes, do they have backs on them? Good, because I will not tolerate anything less than the best from my employees."

I asked her about the other woman and she said, "Oh, she works for me. You will be working for me as well. I had her interview you because I didn't have time to deal with it." I took the contract home, asked if I could have 24 hours to think about it, and left. The way I see it, someone else who needed the job more could work for her. My friends thought I was crazy for turning it down, but I now work at a job I love while someone else is probably working for her and earning money for their family.
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