U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment > Job Search
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 08-09-2010, 10:55 PM
 
Location: USA
973 posts, read 1,039,038 times
Reputation: 1103

Advertisements

I feel I am a scholar at heart. I could care less about the business world -- be it costs, profits, and anything in between.

Oddly enough, I got a bachelor's of Business Administration in Marketing. It's almost been 3 years since I graduated and it's taken me this long to realize that I prefer studying the theory behind consumer behavior to actually applying it. Tell me to sit down and devise a marketing strategy for a brand of toothpaste and I'll cringe. Tell me, however, to research and explain buying patterns for this product over the past 5 decades and I'll be engrossed in no time.

Needless to say, I'd rather read up on industry literature than actually sit down and put it all into practice. It was the same thing when I was an Accounting major (switched to Marketing my junior year) - I wasn't big on spreadsheets; instead I was thumbing through accounting texts and journals.

Since graduating, I've held two jobs in the hospitality industry. My biggest passion is writing/editing and thus I've been fortunate to find two jobs that have allowed me to further cultivate my craft. I got laid off four months after landing the first job, but the second/current job has involved an almost identical set of tasks. I've been charged with writing/editing copy for hotel descriptions, blog descriptions, promotional landing pages, etc. Both jobs have been intellectually stimulating in the sense that they've allowed me to delve into the history of the properties as well as the cities in which they are based. I feel that, in writing these descriptions, I'm actually educating the consumer on everything from hotel amenities to how close the hotel lies to key attractions.

Unfortunately, I've come to the sobering realization that my job is dead end and I'll have to be moving on in the next year or so. But the burning question is: Where to?

Does everything I've just said scream PROFESSOR, or might there be alternative options for me to consider in private industry as well? (I've seen that some companies have organizational learning departments, but I don't know much about what that entails.)

My target industry is higher education (no surprise there), but I honestly don't know what types of jobs I should be looking for. It seems I could shoot for jobs at colleges and universities that involve web editing, copywriting, etc. I've also heard about instructional designers, who work with professors on curriculum, designing learning modules, etc.

Any tips/suggestions much appreciated.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-09-2010, 11:16 PM
 
1,946 posts, read 4,759,578 times
Reputation: 859
Indeed seems you have a bent for academia...though business professors generally do consulting with various corporations.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2010, 11:40 PM
 
Location: Vancouver, BC
547 posts, read 1,403,250 times
Reputation: 509
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wordsmith12 View Post
I feel I am a scholar at heart. I could care less about the business world -- be it costs, profits, and anything in between.

Oddly enough, I got a bachelor's of Business Administration in Marketing. It's almost been 3 years since I graduated and it's taken me this long to realize that I prefer studying the theory behind consumer behavior to actually applying it. Tell me to sit down and devise a marketing strategy for a brand of toothpaste and I'll cringe. Tell me, however, to research and explain buying patterns for this product over the past 5 decades and I'll be engrossed in no time.

Needless to say, I'd rather read up on industry literature than actually sit down and put it all into practice. It was the same thing when I was an Accounting major (switched to Marketing my junior year) - I wasn't big on spreadsheets; instead I was thumbing through accounting texts and journals.

Since graduating, I've held two jobs in the hospitality industry. My biggest passion is writing/editing and thus I've been fortunate to find two jobs that have allowed me to further cultivate my craft. I got laid off four months after landing the first job, but the second/current job has involved an almost identical set of tasks. I've been charged with writing/editing copy for hotel descriptions, blog descriptions, promotional landing pages, etc. Both jobs have been intellectually stimulating in the sense that they've allowed me to delve into the history of the properties as well as the cities in which they are based. I feel that, in writing these descriptions, I'm actually educating the consumer on everything from hotel amenities to how close the hotel lies to key attractions.

Unfortunately, I've come to the sobering realization that my job is dead end and I'll have to be moving on in the next year or so. But the burning question is: Where to?

Does everything I've just said scream PROFESSOR, or might there be alternative options for me to consider in private industry as well? (I've seen that some companies have organizational learning departments, but I don't know much about what that entails.)

My target industry is higher education (no surprise there), but I honestly don't know what types of jobs I should be looking for. It seems I could shoot for jobs at colleges and universities that involve web editing, copywriting, etc. I've also heard about instructional designers, who work with professors on curriculum, designing learning modules, etc.

Any tips/suggestions much appreciated.
It seems best for you to get a PhD in marketing and teach at a business school. Generally employers want to see profitable results rather than theory that can't be used to make more profits.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-10-2010, 05:50 AM
 
9,856 posts, read 13,419,463 times
Reputation: 5453
I think you need to sit down with some PhD's and talk to them about what they do on a day-to-day basis. When I was considering a PhD I scheduled appointments with professors at a local college and asked them about their fields and their daily routines. They were more than happy to take an hour and talk. Doing something like that might help you out a lot.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-10-2010, 06:57 AM
 
2,370 posts, read 4,497,106 times
Reputation: 4206
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wordsmith12 View Post
Does everything I've just said scream PROFESSOR, or might there be alternative options for me to consider in private industry as well? (I've seen that some companies have organizational learning departments, but I don't know much about what that entails.)
I didn't get any "professor" vibe from your post at all.

Quote:
My target industry is higher education (no surprise there), but I honestly don't know what types of jobs I should be looking for. It seems I could shoot for jobs at colleges and universities that involve web editing, copywriting, etc. I've also heard about instructional designers, who work with professors on curriculum, designing learning modules, etc.

Any tips/suggestions much appreciated.
I don't mean to sound harsh but don't expect to get a job at a college "working with professors on curriculum and designing learning modules" with no academic credentials or experience.

I just checked the higher ed jobs web site and see masters and at least three years of teaching experience are required for a faculty development/curriculum design administrative position that pays about 50k a year.

Another curriculum design job listed requires a masters in education or instructional design and a minimum of three years experience in post secondary education.

I would check out the jobs on that site-- even ones that you are not interested in-- just to see what the jobs entail, the experience/education requirements, and salary ranges that are available.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment > Job Search
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top