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Old 08-27-2010, 11:46 AM
 
222 posts, read 698,929 times
Reputation: 190

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HR contacted me and really don't see the point of doing this, it's done over the phone but I'll be sitting at my desk where everyone can hear me? What happens if I refuse to do one or don't respond back to the message that was left for me. Also, does it pay to mention anything negative about your experience when they can just run back and tell your manager? And what about the , would you work here again question? If I do take part in this, should I just give very vague answers?
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Old 08-27-2010, 11:56 AM
 
Location: The City That Never Sleeps
2,043 posts, read 4,857,476 times
Reputation: 3336
I also think it's pointless. If you say anything negative, they might hold it against you. I would either not do it or give vague answers.
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Old 08-27-2010, 01:14 PM
 
Location: Spokane via Sydney,Australia
6,611 posts, read 11,293,756 times
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If it's part of their protocol, then yes you have to have one - but I'd ask for it to be done in PRIVATE with the HR manager.

If they refuse, just keep it really vague and zero negatives as they're obviously not that interested in hearing it.
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Old 08-27-2010, 01:18 PM
 
Location: SoCal, Idaho
3,162 posts, read 8,627,506 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Opyelie View Post
If it's part of their protocol, then yes you have to have one - but I'd ask for it to be done in PRIVATE with the HR manager.
Or what?

I'm not saying that neglecting to do one is a good idea ... but you HAVE to do one? I don't see how you can say that. What if he just DIDN'T do it? Its not like they're going to fire him. The worst that can happen is leaving yourself open to negative employment reviews if using the current company on your resume.
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Old 08-27-2010, 01:34 PM
 
12,258 posts, read 18,393,933 times
Reputation: 19082
Quote:
Originally Posted by Olive1982 View Post
HR contacted me and really don't see the point of doing this, it's done over the phone but I'll be sitting at my desk where everyone can hear me? What happens if I refuse to do one or don't respond back to the message that was left for me. Also, does it pay to mention anything negative about your experience when they can just run back and tell your manager? And what about the , would you work here again question? If I do take part in this, should I just give very vague answers?
Are you asking if you have some legal requirement? You are free to tell them to screw off. Work laws, or the lack of such, work both ways when it comes to hiring and firing.
They may not like it, it may be considered unprofessional, they may not give you that shining review when someone calls about your previous jobs (more than likely, they won't say anything either way) but hey that's why we live in the land of the free - the ability to tell your employer to f themselves without big brother getting involved.
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Old 08-27-2010, 08:41 PM
 
834 posts, read 1,517,912 times
Reputation: 1232
Quote:
Originally Posted by Olive1982 View Post
HR contacted me and really don't see the point of doing this, it's done over the phone but I'll be sitting at my desk where everyone can hear me? What happens if I refuse to do one or don't respond back to the message that was left for me. Also, does it pay to mention anything negative about your experience when they can just run back and tell your manager? And what about the , would you work here again question? If I do take part in this, should I just give very vague answers?

The answer is no. You don't have to do an exit interview if you wish not to do so. I just changed jobs about 2 months ago, and declined to do an exit interview. HR did not ask any questions or comment as to why I declined. These interviews are pointless. Essentially, these interviews accomplish nothing. They are fluff. Don't waste your time worrying. It's your call.
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Old 08-27-2010, 10:14 PM
 
4,805 posts, read 20,223,704 times
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Well you don't HAVE to, but as I mentioned in another thread, how you conduct yourselves in your last days of employment is the last thing your employer will have to remember about you and thus will weigh more heavily in their opinion of you. This includes how you give notice, what you say about your reasons for leaving, and how you wrap up your work. You can either conduct yourself with the highest standards of professionalism, or you can degrade your reputation by behaving badly or carelessly.

Remember, you never know when or how you might cross paths with a manager or peer in the future (and not necessarily related specifically to a job opportunity, there are many ways your paths may cross). You may think you don't care now but there may be a point when you wish you had cared more.

Exit interviews are usually about ten minutes long and pretty sanitized. Is it really that much of a hardship to play the game?
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Old 08-27-2010, 11:18 PM
 
Location: Spokane via Sydney,Australia
6,611 posts, read 11,293,756 times
Reputation: 3097
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1200RT View Post
Or what?

I'm not saying that neglecting to do one is a good idea ... but you HAVE to do one? I don't see how you can say that. What if he just DIDN'T do it? Its not like they're going to fire him. The worst that can happen is leaving yourself open to negative employment reviews if using the current company on your resume.
I have known companies to have an exit interview cited in their handbook as a requirement and you can lose entitlement to severance pay etc if it's refused. They can also check the box "not eligible for rehire" in that case as well.

Better to be safe than sorry, it's not THAT big a deal.
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Old 08-28-2010, 12:39 AM
 
262 posts, read 877,590 times
Reputation: 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by Opyelie View Post
If it's part of their protocol, then yes you have to have one - but I'd ask for it to be done in PRIVATE with the HR manager.
You don't have to do anything if you don't want. What are they going to do? Fire you from a job that you are leaving? In most cases, the worst that could happen is that you leave a company on bad terms. That's not something I would recommend, but company protocols don't mean jack **** once you decide to quit. They could have policies on severance pay that require an exit interview, but that still doesn't obligate you to do it in a legal sense.

I've done 3 exit interviews in my life. At the first two companies, I wanted to leave on good terms and I wanted them to understand that I had a good experience there. At the last company, I wanted to leave on good terms, but I also wanted the HR person to know *exactly* why I was leaving: low pay, too much unpaid overtime (salaried for the loss) and mediocre benefits. I was tactful, but I didn't sugar coat anything. I felt like I was doing my coworkers a favor, because I had the ability to say what a lot of them were thinking, but couldn't say aloud. It's been almost 6 months, but my former boss has told me 4 or 5 different times that I am always welcome to come back. So, it's definitely possible to be blunt without stepping on any toes.

So, unless you had a really bad experience and you're afraid the company will hold complaints against you, I'd just go ahead and do the exit interview. But to answer your question - it is completely voluntary, no matter what the company tells you.
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Old 08-28-2010, 12:40 AM
 
Location: southern california
55,644 posts, read 74,585,953 times
Reputation: 48133
i like them. if you listen between the lines they can be very useful. also scheduling one-- helps to stall for time so you can talk to your lawyer and plan your attack.
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