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Old 08-06-2011, 06:15 PM
 
Location: Southern Willamette Valley, Oregon
6,837 posts, read 7,894,493 times
Reputation: 12685

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Just curious if there are any other people out there who are selling their achievements short on their resume in the hopes to find ANY type of work. It seems companies these days are looking more for fresh out of high school newbies that they can mold (or even ex-cons in some cases).

Do you have a Bachelors degree, possibly a Masters, or maybe even a Doctorate? Do you find yourself rediculously overqualified for jobs that are below your level, but slightly underqualified for the jobs you really want due to the required experience desired by the prospective employer?

My question really has no bearing on where you went to school, or what your degree is in (as long as it was an accredited institution), because the question is assuming that the job you are applying for does not require an advanced degree (or possibly any degree at all), and you meet the necessary minimum qualifications for the position.

How many people out there omit some (or all) of their achievements to find any kind of work?
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Old 08-06-2011, 06:37 PM
 
Location: Metro Detroit, Michigan
12,673 posts, read 14,005,324 times
Reputation: 13498
So people are spending thousands to get their degrees... Just so they can remove it from their resumes? We live in some very strange times...
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Old 08-06-2011, 06:39 PM
 
Location: Wicker Park, Chicago
4,791 posts, read 13,201,484 times
Reputation: 1944
No, I don't dumb down my resume. Even when the economy was good in 2005 I gave my technical resume and was hired for a bike messenger job. Previous car messenger jobs - did the same. In H.S. I worked Toys 'R Us PT. When I got laid off in Houston in 2008 the Toys R Us in Houston said they'd take me if I had retail experience. Even for an entry level technical job - I don't dumb down my resume.
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Old 08-06-2011, 06:41 PM
 
Location: Southern Willamette Valley, Oregon
6,837 posts, read 7,894,493 times
Reputation: 12685
Quote:
Originally Posted by andywire View Post
So people are spending thousands to get their degrees... Just so they can remove it from their resumes? We live in some very strange times...
Imagine that! News articles like this one don't help either!

Job listings say the unemployed need not apply | The Lookout - Yahoo! News
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Old 08-06-2011, 06:57 PM
 
15,149 posts, read 19,745,101 times
Reputation: 21319
I did it in the 1980's, but only to remove the fact that I had been a supervisor. I didnt ever want to be a supervisor again -- and I knew that, in my field, some supervisors would feel that, despite my claim to the contrary, I would want an eventual promotion to the supervisory level. It worked out very well for me.
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Old 08-06-2011, 07:52 PM
 
Location: Connecticut
1,144 posts, read 1,823,367 times
Reputation: 1339
I read that story on the CNN website quite some time ago - A division of Sony in Georgia was gearing up and informed any headhunters not to send anyone not already employed - Some how this information made it to the newspapers and the rest is history - The Feds should make the unemployed a protected class as we are being discriminated against - As far as dumbing down my resume I dont - My last question at the interview I ask if they have any concerns about hiring me which would give them an opportunity to say they feel I may not be satisfied with the position -
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Old 08-06-2011, 07:58 PM
 
Location: Southern Willamette Valley, Oregon
6,837 posts, read 7,894,493 times
Reputation: 12685
Quote:
Originally Posted by PJ1252 View Post
I read that story on the CNN website quite some time ago - A division of Sony in Georgia was gearing up and informed any headhunters not to send anyone not already employed.
Good to know where it all began! Guess who's products just lost my patronage. I'll make sure to spread the word.
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Old 08-06-2011, 08:32 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
29,750 posts, read 54,373,866 times
Reputation: 31045
Dumbing down a resume is. . . dumb.

For one thing, it's falsification to leave out relevant information which is for most companies, grounds for immediate dismissal when discovered. At some point you're likely to let something slip out. Employers are not going to pass up the best person for the job if they are overqualified and can, in the interviews, convince them that they really want the job. I do not mind people having ambition to do something else that pays more and using my opening to gain valuable experience, it means they will eventually need a good recommendation and therefore are likely to work hard and do a good job. I'm not expecting everyone I hire to stay 35 years and retire in that job, in fact I won't be there that long!
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Old 08-06-2011, 08:42 PM
 
5,641 posts, read 17,308,313 times
Reputation: 3979
I did not dumb mine down but just left certain details out. And generally only post what I did for the last 10 years. Prior to that, no one cares (at least in my field). And left off graduation dates. Do not want to face age discrimination as it happens to most over age 40 now.
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Old 08-07-2011, 04:47 AM
 
Location: Southern Willamette Valley, Oregon
6,837 posts, read 7,894,493 times
Reputation: 12685
[quote=Hemlock140;20348590]
Quote:
Dumbing down a resume is. . . dumb.
I agree. Sadly, the way you and I think is not the angle in which corporate headhunters view the situation from.

Quote:
For one thing, it's falsification to leave out relevant information which is for most companies, grounds for immediate dismissal when discovered. At some point you're likely to let something slip out.
This is more in regards to stuff like criminal history and items that could be viewed as a serious negative on a persons history (such as terminations/resignations). Nobody lists all of their achievements and qualifications. This would make the resume multiple pages in length. You put down what applies to the job you are applying for. If having a particular degree is not relevant to the job, what does it matter?

Quote:
Employers are not going to pass up the best person for the job if they are overqualified and can, in the interviews, convince them that they really want the job.
This is where you're dead wrong my friend. Overqualified can mean multiple threatening things to a potential employer. The key word in your statement is "interviews". If the person isn't even making it to the interview stage, there are problems. Just because someone doesn't make it to the interview stage does not mean that they don't possess the academic and minimum qualifications for the listed position. It can work both ways. The bottom line is this: You do what you have to do to secure the interview so you can see a person face to face and they can attatch a face to your name. These days, many resumes never even make it into the hands of a human being. They are screened out by a computer system that searches for keywords. If your resume info does not contain certain keywords, the system does not forward it, and you are sent a generic denial letter.

Quote:
I do not mind people having ambition to do something else that pays more and using my opening to gain valuable experience, it means they will eventually need a good recommendation and therefore are likely to work hard and do a good job. I'm not expecting everyone I hire to stay 35 years and retire in that job, in fact I won't be there that long!
You are thinking like a small business owner, and that is a beautiful thing. Sadly, it is far from reality. Companies don't like being used as a stepping stone. They see spending $$$ on training you as a waste since they perceive you as someone who's not going to stay for the long haul. Also, many people who take jobs below their level are set in their ways already. Companies want the type of people they can mold into their culture with minimal effort. If you're a hiring manager/boss at a smaller company, are you saying that you would not feel intimidated to hire a person who's credentials make you look like you just fell out of high school? No one wants that type of competition/job threat running around their facility.

There are many other reasons as well. These are just the basics.

Last edited by ditchlights; 08-07-2011 at 04:59 AM..
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