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Old 08-21-2011, 12:52 PM
 
Location: 112 Ocean Avenue
5,706 posts, read 8,130,031 times
Reputation: 8886

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The recession accelerated existing trends that make hiring harder, from increased efficiency at companies to higher skill requirements, says Manpower’s Joerres. With demand sagging again, he adds, “companies can wait” and have “raised the bar.”

Companies are hiring

Most companies complaining about the lack of talent only have themselves to blame.

1.) They refuse to hire anyone w/o years of experience

2.) They think OJT is some kind of sandwich

3.) Multitasking (doing the work of three people) is required

4.) Pisspoor wages

5.) Crap for benefits

6.) Working 60 hours a week and getting paid for 40

All their whining is a way to justify shipping jobs overseas or bringing in workers from other countries who'll work for peanuts. There's plenty of skilled people in this country to fill jobs.

But most would like a livable wage along with a company that treats them like an asset and not like an ass. That's just not happening.
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Old 08-21-2011, 01:36 PM
 
Location: Northside Of Jacksonville
3,288 posts, read 6,109,502 times
Reputation: 3375
Already. No one in their right mind is going to work for a company that treats them like poo, and ultimately won't look out for their best interest. If anything, employees are the heart and soul of the company because without employees, management would have to do the work they are paying employees to do and their own jobs. See how that works out.
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Old 08-21-2011, 02:09 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,069 posts, read 16,085,690 times
Reputation: 12647
1) People without experience are not talented.
2) People who are talented do not need OJT... that's why they are called talented and not clueless.
3) Talented includes cross-training in the modern work place. If all you can do is one task, you are not talented.
4). Yes, I am seeing this. People are desperate and will work for less. I don't see how this is a bad thing for employers.
5) Try paying for your "crap" benefits on the market as I do. They're expensive. See #4.
6) Professional jobs have long required 55+ hour a week commitments and many professionals are salaried. Nothing new.
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Old 08-21-2011, 03:11 PM
 
Location: Metro Detroit, Michigan
12,675 posts, read 14,016,723 times
Reputation: 13500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
6) Professional jobs have long required 55+ hour a week commitments and many professionals are salaried. Nothing new.
This one gets me all the time. People who have it in their heads that they should not have to work more than 40 hours a week. I have met very few professionals who made good money who didn't put at least 55 hours a week in the office, unless they we're worth quite a bit. I guess you could work 40 hours if you really wanted to, but don't expect to make great money. Some of the older professionals do work 40 hour a week schedules, but that's because they have saved enough to not be motivated for great money, or their time is worth considerably more than the average experienced worker.
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Old 08-21-2011, 03:21 PM
 
8,680 posts, read 13,304,191 times
Reputation: 15273
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
1) People without experience are not talented.
2) People who are talented do not need OJT... that's why they are called talented and not clueless.
3) Talented includes cross-training in the modern work place. If all you can do is one task, you are not talented.
4). Yes, I am seeing this. People are desperate and will work for less. I don't see how this is a bad thing for employers.
5) Try paying for your "crap" benefits on the market as I do. They're expensive. See #4.
6) Professional jobs have long required 55+ hour a week commitments and many professionals are salaried. Nothing new.

1) Experience has nothing to do with talent. We all start somewhere.

2) Everyone needs to learn the processes of a particular workplace. Also, as that workplace introduces new technology and so on, you'd better believe OJT is necessary. Employees should not have to pay to take a seminar offsite out of their own pockets.

3) Spreading an employee too thin will give you thin results. If you want people to excel, it is up to you, as the employer, to get the most out of their strengths. Anything else is bad management.

4) You get what you pay for. GIGO--garbage in, garbage out.

5) If you can't afford to give your employees health care, you have no business having employees. If you don't see the value in giving your employees time off, and you aren't familiar with how much more productive well-rested employees are, you'll soon be out of business anyway, because your products will start to suck, you'll be turning over staff like flapjacks at a country brunch (with all the attending costs of orientation and ramp-up for new employees), and eventually someone is going to make a big mistake that wrecks your reputation.

6) That is simply not true. I'm 44 years old and I haven't worked even 45 hours in one week since I was 23, while working for someone else. (When I break 40 freelancing, it's because I'm marketing my skills and doing all of the administrative stuff, like researching prospects.) Ditto nearly all of my colleagues. If your employees are working 55 hours a week all the time, it means one of several things: they are not qualified for the jobs they are in, which is your fault for hiring them; you are understaffed, which is also your fault; they have personal problems and don't want to go home.

Your words are those of an exploiter, and they represent all that is wrong with the American workplace these days. I suspect that when the economy turns around, you'll be screaming bloody murder about how good help is hard to find--if you're still in business at all.

Last edited by Yzette; 08-21-2011 at 03:31 PM..
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Old 08-21-2011, 04:09 PM
 
17,002 posts, read 20,682,700 times
Reputation: 33988
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yzette View Post
1) Experience has nothing to do with talent. We all start somewhere.

2) Everyone needs to learn the processes of a particular workplace. Also, as that workplace introduces new technology and so on, you'd better believe OJT is necessary. Employees should not have to pay to take a seminar offsite out of their own pockets.

3) Spreading an employee too thin will give you thin results. If you want people to excel, it is up to you, as the employer, to get the most out of their strengths. Anything else is bad management.

4) You get what you pay for. GIGO--garbage in, garbage out.

5) If you can't afford to give your employees health care, you have no business having employees. If you don't see the value in giving your employees time off, and you aren't familiar with how much more productive well-rested employees are, you'll soon be out of business anyway, because your products will start to suck, you'll be turning over staff like flapjacks at a country brunch (with all the attending costs of orientation and ramp-up for new employees), and eventually someone is going to make a big mistake that wrecks your reputation.

6) That is simply not true. I'm 44 years old and I haven't worked even 45 hours in one week since I was 23, while working for someone else. (When I break 40 freelancing, it's because I'm marketing my skills and doing all of the administrative stuff, like researching prospects.) Ditto nearly all of my colleagues. If your employees are working 55 hours a week all the time, it means one of several things: they are not qualified for the jobs they are in, which is your fault for hiring them; you are understaffed, which is also your fault; they have personal problems and don't want to go home.

Your words are those of an exploiter, and they represent all that is wrong with the American workplace these days. I suspect that when the economy turns around, you'll be screaming bloody murder about how good help is hard to find--if you're still in business at all.
Agree. Especially with #6.

In addition a lot of people just don't work smart.

I shared an office with a woman who had a son who is was 20yrs old and very problematic. She was constantly on the phone with him, one of his doctors, he had legal issues, and was prone to violence.

She would work till 7 or 8pm every night, there was no reason for that but since she spent at least an hour or so a day in regards to her son she stayed late.

He lived with her and having met him once got a strong feeling the home environment was not a good one.

But something is wrong if someone is working excessive hours every week.
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Old 08-21-2011, 04:10 PM
 
Location: NJ
2,212 posts, read 6,341,313 times
Reputation: 2174
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedJacket View Post
All their whining is a way to justify shipping jobs overseas or bringing in workers from other countries who'll work for peanuts. There's plenty of skilled people in this country to fill jobs.
This is definitely being seen in the IT world. Like a kid in a candy store trying to convince Mommy that they are starving and absolutely HAVE to have that Snickers, many companies salivate over cheap labor overseas and are desperately trying to convince anyone who will listen that there are no other options.

This is plainly not true, those companies simply don't want to admit that they aren't willing to pay American market rates for the appropriate labor.

Unfortunately, the jobs will go overseas, the standard of living will drop and eventually labor here will match rates of labor overseas. It's going to be a painful process.
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Old 08-21-2011, 04:58 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
29,806 posts, read 54,470,896 times
Reputation: 31111
The thread title is true, there is plenty of hiring going on. It's simply an employer's market right now with plenty of well qualified candidates out there competing for each opening.

People without experience may have plenty of talent, but they require a lot more training than those with both talent and experience. They can produce at the job sooner and with less cost to the employer.

We do as much cross-training as possible after a person has mastered their duties, it's just a smart business practice to cover times when someone is off sick, on vacation, or needs help with a rush or big project.

Due to the economy we have reduced the raise percentages but starting pay and the salary ranges have remained the same. Some employers might be paying less, again because they can. Just like house process have dropped. The only bad thing for employers is the time spend wading through all the applications.

Our benefit contributions have gone up a bit but it's still a bargain at about 10% of what it was when I was self employed and paying for it myself.

As salaried management I work at least 50 hours a week, sometimes more but that's half of what I worked when self-employed. It's nothing new, I worked that many hours or more in a preiou management job in the 1980's. That's just normal.
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Old 08-21-2011, 05:06 PM
 
346 posts, read 419,060 times
Reputation: 674
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yzette View Post
1) Experience has nothing to do with talent. We all start somewhere.

2) Everyone needs to learn the processes of a particular workplace. Also, as that workplace introduces new technology and so on, you'd better believe OJT is necessary. Employees should not have to pay to take a seminar offsite out of their own pockets.

3) Spreading an employee too thin will give you thin results. If you want people to excel, it is up to you, as the employer, to get the most out of their strengths. Anything else is bad management.

4) You get what you pay for. GIGO--garbage in, garbage out.

5) If you can't afford to give your employees health care, you have no business having employees. If you don't see the value in giving your employees time off, and you aren't familiar with how much more productive well-rested employees are, you'll soon be out of business anyway, because your products will start to suck, you'll be turning over staff like flapjacks at a country brunch (with all the attending costs of orientation and ramp-up for new employees), and eventually someone is going to make a big mistake that wrecks your reputation.

6) That is simply not true. I'm 44 years old and I haven't worked even 45 hours in one week since I was 23, while working for someone else. (When I break 40 freelancing, it's because I'm marketing my skills and doing all of the administrative stuff, like researching prospects.) Ditto nearly all of my colleagues. If your employees are working 55 hours a week all the time, it means one of several things: they are not qualified for the jobs they are in, which is your fault for hiring them; you are understaffed, which is also your fault; they have personal problems and don't want to go home.

Your words are those of an exploiter, and they represent all that is wrong with the American workplace these days. I suspect that when the economy turns around, you'll be screaming bloody murder about how good help is hard to find--if you're still in business at all.


I agree with EVERY word.
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Old 08-21-2011, 05:24 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,943,432 times
Reputation: 18050
But you are the one who says that the successful are the ones your talking about. Its just the economic realities really.Even in past recessions business did not hire the untrained over the trained;it would make no sense to.Even what skills are needed is changing quicker than ever and its been no secret unless a person had their head in the sand.
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