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Old 02-02-2012, 07:57 PM
 
173 posts, read 288,306 times
Reputation: 82

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In December 2011, while I was in training, one of my supervisors told me that you shouldn't ask how much you get paid during an interview. If you do, there is a high chance of you being denied the job.

My response is: BULLCRAP!

Most companies don't tell you how much you will get paid in a job description. If you even dare to ask them how much you will get paid, they might think that you're desperate and reject you.

Heck, you shouldn't even MENTION salary information during an interview. My other supervisor told me that you shouldn't ask that your paychecks be sent in the mail. Which is also bullcrap.

The important thing about being an employee is knowing how much you get paid.

What's Wrong? Are you scared that if you tell the employee how much you will make, he will whine because that's not enough and quit? Is this some sort of golden rule where it is not appropriate to ask how much YOU will get paid?
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Old 02-02-2012, 08:14 PM
 
2,138 posts, read 4,787,564 times
Reputation: 3146
I have been in probably 35-50 interviews in my life, and unless I knew beforehand, I ALWAYS asked the salary sometime during the interview. Why waste anyone's time? Dude who told you that is an idiot.
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Old 02-02-2012, 08:46 PM
 
173 posts, read 288,306 times
Reputation: 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by YaFace View Post
I have been in probably 35-50 interviews in my life, and unless I knew beforehand, I ALWAYS asked the salary sometime during the interview. Why waste anyone's time? Dude who told you that is an idiot.
I think he told me that because it was never appropriate to ask for money during an interview. He just didn't recommend that I asked about my salary because there are so many dim-witted managers out there. But I'm still pissed if you're wrong.
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Old 02-02-2012, 09:49 PM
 
1,950 posts, read 3,295,980 times
Reputation: 1331
I have an interview tomorrow. I want to know how much I would possibly make so I am going to ask.
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Old 02-02-2012, 10:43 PM
 
1,429 posts, read 2,109,864 times
Reputation: 1891
I always ask. It saved me once, as one place wanted to start the hiring process after the interview, until I asked "what's the pay?"

Turned out it was $6/hr less than average in the area, and would of been only slightly less intensive than other locations. I told them I was sorry but that I couldn't accept that offer, and went with another location that payed appropriately.

That location has been advertising in the paper the last 6 weeks.
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Old 02-02-2012, 11:56 PM
 
134 posts, read 317,489 times
Reputation: 209
I had it explained to me what the ranges were in a couple interviews, and I asked in another because I knew I was getting an offer from elsewhere and didn't want to waste time beating around the bush if there wasn't anything good there.
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Old 02-03-2012, 03:34 AM
 
16,797 posts, read 14,539,768 times
Reputation: 37896
This is a symptom of what is wrong with with so many employment relationships. Jobseekers act as if the potential employer is doing them a great favor by hiring them--which is absurd. As if following up on an application, asking the wrong questions or wearing the wrong socks at an interview is going to cause the hiring manager to reject you as a form of punishment.

Please. The employer is looking for the person who is going to do the best job at improving the bottom line and making money for the company. If you have what it takes to do that, you have equal if not more power in that relationship. Act like it. In the professional world, nobody wants a subservient butt-kisser representing their company.
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Old 02-03-2012, 04:35 AM
 
Location: In the loop
370 posts, read 1,165,634 times
Reputation: 655
You have every right to know the range. If they are not willing to give you at least a range, you can figure they don't value your possible skills or they just want a 10 dollar an hour worker. (or someone who will go lower).
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Old 02-03-2012, 04:51 AM
 
Location: St Thomas, US Virgin Islands
24,671 posts, read 58,399,658 times
Reputation: 26532
If no salary range is advertised why on earth would you NOT ask the question? That's insanely illogical. I would even ask it before going for an interview. Of course there's a diplomatic way of doing it and the first question out of your mouth shouldn't be along the lines of, "So, what's the pay?" !
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Old 02-03-2012, 05:40 AM
 
15,353 posts, read 17,612,250 times
Reputation: 13483
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheEarthBeneathMe View Post
I always ask. It saved me once, as one place wanted to start the hiring process after the interview, until I asked "what's the pay?"

Turned out it was $6/hr less than average in the area, and would of been only slightly less intensive than other locations. I told them I was sorry but that I couldn't accept that offer....

Pay is negotiable.

Before you reject an offer, always counter-offer with what you will accept. Often they will increase their offer if you are an excellent fit for the position.

Here is how you negotiate if you are trying to get more money, even if the original pay is acceptable.

Company: "We want to offer you the position, the starting salary is $50k year..."

Applicant: " I am excited about the opportunity. Can you increase the starting salary to $58k?. I would be a productive employee from day 1 and I know I can improve your sales numbers immediately".

Figure: 10% of employees negotiate their starting salaries higher. Employers are ready and willing to negotiate the salaries but most peope don't attempt this.

****Key Negotiating Tactic: NEVER SAY "I WON"T ACCEPT IT AT THAT PAY RATE". Instead, ask "can you make it $15?" If they say that they cannot, you want to leave the door open so that you can accept the lower salary if you choose.

It is very common to tell then you are excited about the opportunity but want to consider the offer overnight and you will respond to them the next day. The next day you can come back with the counter offer if you choose.

I have successfully negotiated a higher salary several times. I also got 2 extra weeks paid vacation every year through negotiation. I learned this negotiation method through career placement training.
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