U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment > Job Search
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-13-2012, 01:36 PM
 
478 posts, read 1,623,029 times
Reputation: 268

Advertisements

OK, I got a verbal offer on a job I've been trying to get last Thursday, but nothing in writing. I would have had exactly 2 weeks notice to give my current employer (a company that still expects that tradition) had I had the written offer last Friday, the 10th, but as of today at 3:34 pm I still don't have the WRITTEN offer in my email. They said "late Friday or Early Monday" I'll get it.

Here's the problem - I HAVE to start 2/27 to get into the licensing and training portion of the job, so I can't simply extend my start date to give a full 2 weeks notice to my current job. I'm not trusting enough this day and age to risk losing THIS job if it turns out either they renege the new job offer or it has some "fine print" I won't agree with.

My main concern is a bad reference from the current job in the future...any advice?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-13-2012, 01:52 PM
 
15,837 posts, read 8,038,620 times
Reputation: 4420
I wouldn't worry about it. Worry about our national debt before your worry about this tiny thing. That's your retirement and your children at stake.

No company will provide good reference for an ex-employee; they won't provide anything bad either. The only thing they will say is that from X to Y date, you had worked here. That's all.

If you need references, you should have made friends with your coworkers and supervisors.

Give the notice once you have written offer in hand, then tell your current employer that you are sorry but there isn't much you can do.

By the way, when the employer fire or lay us off, have they ever give us any 2 weeks notice?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-13-2012, 01:53 PM
 
156 posts, read 439,045 times
Reputation: 183
Definitely don't say anything to your current employer until you have a written offer in hand.

You're not required to give 2 weeks notice but it is a courtesy. As you said, its in your best interest to leave your current job on good terms - don't burn any bridges.

I don't fully understand the training situation - is it a pre-scheduled class that is starting? You can always offer to come back to your previous employer after the training to complete your two week notification (most likely they will say no thank you). And remember that any new employer who takes issue with you giving a prior employer 2 weeks (something they would want their own employees to do when leaving) may give you problems later down the road.

Good luck and congratulations on the new position.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-13-2012, 01:58 PM
 
4,805 posts, read 19,128,253 times
Reputation: 4918
It's pretty standard practice that two weeks' notice starts when you receive the written offer. The company should know this but you should reach out to them and confirm that you will receive the offer by EOB today so that you can start at the next training period.

As nctechie says, if the employer pressures you to quit your current job without anything in writing from them, it probably spells trouble. No respectable employer would expect you put yourself out on a limb with no job security, for them.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-13-2012, 01:59 PM
 
478 posts, read 1,623,029 times
Reputation: 268
Quote:
Originally Posted by nctecchie View Post
Definitely don't say anything to your current employer until you have a written offer in hand.

You're not required to give 2 weeks notice but it is a courtesy. As you said, its in your best interest to leave your current job on good terms - don't burn any bridges.

I don't fully understand the training situation - is it a pre-scheduled class that is starting? You can always offer to come back to your previous employer after the training to complete your two week notification (most likely they will say no thank you). And remember that any new employer who takes issue with you giving a prior employer 2 weeks (something they would want their own employees to do when leaving) may give you problems later down the road.

Good luck and congratulations on the new position.
They already pushed off my final interview knowing that I was the one who wanted to give 2 weeks notice (the new company's recruiter seemed convinced they'd "walk me right out the door" once I resigned, but this company doesn't do that, I've seen several people leave over the years). The training at this new company is done every 4 weeks, when a new class starts. I don't think coming back to finish out 2 weeks at the old job is an option since the training is a multi part licensing, mentoring, etc. issue.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-13-2012, 02:07 PM
 
15,837 posts, read 8,038,620 times
Reputation: 4420
Again, don't worry about the 2 weeks. This is a non-issue.

Please, let's talk about the national debt!!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-13-2012, 02:10 PM
 
Location: MS
200 posts, read 491,128 times
Reputation: 269
If they said they would email it late friday or early monday, could you call the new employer and ask if there was an error of some sort because you still haven't recieved it?

I would not give the two weeks until I had the written offer. Then I would put the new employer as a priority, therefore making my two week more of a week and a half notice (or however many days I have after I get the hand written offer). If you feel like you need the 10 days to finish out your current job, work the weekend to make up for being 2 days short of a 2 week.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-13-2012, 02:13 PM
 
209 posts, read 244,103 times
Reputation: 170
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chzanne View Post
If they said they would email it late friday or early monday, could you call the new employer and ask if there was an error of some sort because you still haven't recieved it?

I would not give the two weeks until I had the written offer. Then I would put the new employer as a priority, therefore making my two week more of a week and a half notice (or however many days I have after I get the hand written offer). If you feel like you need the 10 days to finish out your current job, work the weekend to make up for being 2 days short of a 2 week.
You can get away with a couple days short rather easily...

Last edited by TimR76; 02-13-2012 at 02:22 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-13-2012, 02:27 PM
 
9,122 posts, read 15,063,074 times
Reputation: 16498
I wouldn't worry about, especially since it can easily be explained away based on the required start date of the new employer.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-13-2012, 03:04 PM
 
43,012 posts, read 86,873,843 times
Reputation: 30168
You give your two weeks notice after receiving the written offer. If the new employer drags their feet sending the written offer, they should know you will be starting later than expected. Wait until that offer is in your hand, then inform the new employer what your start date will be based on when you received the offer. They can't expect you to give notice without anything in writing because you could risk being jobless.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment > Job Search
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2017, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32 - Top