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Old 05-25-2012, 02:34 PM
 
5 posts, read 10,165 times
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Hello All,

I graduated college last year and the job process has been rather burdensome, dealing with temp agencies, interviews, applications etc.

I was working part time for the longest time at a small company (direct hire) and not seeing any progress for conversion to Full time employment.

A temp agency convinced me to apply for a full time position at a very respectable biotech company for a 6month-1yr contract. However, I dislike the job, and it isn't what I really want to be doing for very long, and the chances that it COULD take me to what I'd like to be doing are ambiguous. So I've been still searching for jobs when I have free time. Also, the contracting agency was vague in the job description, and I thought I'd be doing something else for some of my duties, but I'm not.

I started about a month and a half ago, and am starting to hear back in emails from job positions I'd rather be doing, some of which would be direct hires. Should I update my 1.5 month experience for my new job into my new resume? I certainly feel I should, because I can speak about the skills I learned in that 1 month period.

If I land an interview, how should I approach the topic of my desire to leave a position I just got? I would assume I can merely state that this is not what I'd like to be doing-and the position from the initial agency said i'd be doing certain things that I'm not, and it is a temp position which may end soon.
I want to be able to talk about this without making it sound like I am unloyal to the company. Obviously I would put in a 2 week notice etc. So to summarize, is it worth mentioning my most recent job I am working through an agency, and how do I go about explaining my desire to leave?

Thanks.
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Old 05-25-2012, 02:48 PM
 
Location: USA
7,478 posts, read 5,786,020 times
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I can't exactly address your concerns, but know this - anyone who promises to hire you full-time while only giving you contract work is lying to you.

There is a huge glut of workers these days, so no matter how good you are, employers see you as disposable. Since it is cheaper to swap people on temp assignments vs. hiring them full time and having to pay them benefits, they'll keep everyone temp as long as possible. Sure, it may not be possible to earn a living this way, but they need to worry about their executive bonuses, so that's all that matters, sadly.

So, yeah - if a place really wants to hire you full time, they need to do so. Anything else is an empty promise.
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Old 05-25-2012, 03:01 PM
 
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Thanks for the reality check....

Now that I'm aware of this, can I use my short experience at my current job, to update my resume and apply for new jobs? Or would that only backfire since I just started...

FYI, some of these positions are not through agencies, they would be through the company itself.
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Old 05-25-2012, 03:42 PM
 
Location: USA
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I don't know what your field of study is, but in the engineering world, even the most entry level jobs require 3 to 5 years experience, and usually in some painfully narrow industry (designing seat cushions for automobiles, designing a specific type of turbine, etc.) This means that it may be very difficult to find a new job until you meet these minimum requirements. Until then, you may have to put up with the lies and nonsense. Just don't trust the snakeoil salesmen who promise you a full-time job, and yet somehow it "mysteriously" never happens.

Focus on developing your skills and getting to the point where you have enough experience to change jobs; that experience level varies by career, but I hope my engineering example helps.
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Old 05-25-2012, 03:55 PM
 
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Thanks your example does help. I'm a biology major and wanted to do research, but ended up in manufacturing.

My current work routine feels basically housekeeping at a biotech plant. I get your example, but I'd rather not settle for years doing something like this, especially when a few people I know landed research experience in industry with my same level of experience and education. The main reason I took this gig was because it was full time (need some $), and also the had their facts wrong about the job description, which made it sound more appealing to me.

Point I'm making is I'm still actively seeking for research related jobs (advice I've gotten from people is take the current temp job, but keep looking for something you'd rather do) ....Say I were to get an interview tomorrow, would it look bad to the person interviewing me that I want to bail out on my current temp position after a mere 1.5 months?
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Old 05-25-2012, 03:58 PM
 
Location: USA
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It used to be that "job-hopping" was heavily frowned upon, but then again, you're new in your career, so leaving 1 place quickly isn't really job-hopping. It would be different if you'd been in the industry for 10 years and worked for 10 different companies without any logical reason for the constant switching.

Also, since it is a temp job, I don't think leaving it after a short period of time would seem suspicious since it's only temp work anyway.

I hope this helps!
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Old 05-25-2012, 04:18 PM
 
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Yes it does!

I want to still be able to talk about my experience there in subsequent interviews, despite my short time. However, I'm not sure the best way to communicate it....If any interviewer asked me "Why did you leave so soon"

This is where I would need to properly know how to communicate my response, which I'm stuck at. I would likely say that I left because it was a temp position, and not what I wanted to do long term. I took the position initially, because it was better then nothing, and I would not want to let an opportunity like this position that I am now interviewing for get passed up because I chose to be actively working rather then sitting at home doing nothing.

I'm just not good at wording things out, and struggle with communicating effectively and don't want to raise flags.
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Old 05-25-2012, 04:25 PM
 
Location: USA
7,478 posts, read 5,786,020 times
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The desire to go from a temp position to a full-time one is natural. That way, you're part of the company, can contribute more to the team, develop your skills, and so on. Things like that sound good to most hiring managers, so I think you're fine.

Just don't focus on the negative. Even if the place at which you currently work for is run by the criminally insane, don't mention that in the job interview... save it for a book or movie later... Hehehe...
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Old 05-25-2012, 06:33 PM
 
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Right on!
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Old 05-25-2012, 09:56 PM
 
Location: Out West
22,699 posts, read 16,808,575 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mizterblack View Post
Yes it does!

I want to still be able to talk about my experience there in subsequent interviews, despite my short time. However, I'm not sure the best way to communicate it....If any interviewer asked me "Why did you leave so soon"

This is where I would need to properly know how to communicate my response, which I'm stuck at. I would likely say that I left because it was a temp position, and not what I wanted to do long term. I took the position initially, because it was better then nothing, and I would not want to let an opportunity like this position that I am now interviewing for get passed up because I chose to be actively working rather then sitting at home doing nothing.

I'm just not good at wording things out, and struggle with communicating effectively and don't want to raise flags.
Question: "Why did you leave so soon?"

Answer: "It was a temp job."

End. Moving on to the next question.
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