U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment > Job Search
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-28-2012, 08:16 AM
 
Location: Western Washington
9,008 posts, read 8,425,582 times
Reputation: 15617

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by KABurke View Post
Support workers can never negotiate vacation time from coming fresh on board a company. You're probably not support level, either.

Ditto above. Maybe you're not support level. I cannot imagine going into a new company telling THEM how much vacation time I want. They'd say, "no, here's what you get. You don't like it? You're free to leave."
Entry level employees probably cannot. I am middle management and have successfully negotiated extra vacation.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-28-2012, 08:17 AM
 
Location: Chicago
3,070 posts, read 5,323,979 times
Reputation: 3549
Quote:
Originally Posted by smarterguy View Post
I realized that after I got my first raise at my first company out of college (<$1000) after clearly out performing most of my colleagues. Left 6 months later for 7k more (35k to 42k). Three more jobs later and six years, I'm at 90k.

I also learned loyality is for chumps after watching my brother, Uncle, and mother let go for almost nefarious reasons after busting their butts. When I accepted my first job, I had delusions that this compay would be like my father's, where he work for 25 years and made a good living. I have yet to encounter and private employer like that.
So true. I jumped from 38K (got a raise to 40K). Accepted a new offer at 52K for a new job (got a raise to 56K there, which is certainly fair). From there I accepted another new job at 73K. All in 3 years. Hopefully my current one will give me a hefty raise.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-28-2012, 08:58 AM
 
753 posts, read 2,255,227 times
Reputation: 767
Quote:
Originally Posted by fishbrains View Post
Entry level employees probably cannot. I am middle management and have successfully negotiated extra vacation.
Entry level to the tier below management.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-28-2012, 09:58 AM
 
15,554 posts, read 13,550,797 times
Reputation: 21342
Many companies have employees negotiate for vacation time, even the lowest paid menial jobs can negotiate.

Job hopping for increased pay and/or responsibilites is a normal part of career progression. If the company wishes to retain you, then they will pay you more and/or promote you. Often, there are no promotion opportunities available, so the company gives lump sum bonuses to retian employees.

A person will generally be paid more over their career if they move from company to company, rather than stay with the same company for many years. Reason is that hiring salaries in many fields increase with the market rate, however, merit increases will only amount to so much over a person's career. Companies are suppose to provide equity increases, but many fail to do so.

As far as the negotiated salary; I would never give pay stubs to the employer, the employer has the market rate data for your position, I assure you they are not going to pay a new employee past this, or even past the middle market rate unless the employee is bringing exceptional talent to the business. In my opinion, it is just poor recruiting to base a salary off of a previous salary, can lead to all kinds of problems.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-28-2012, 10:09 AM
 
753 posts, read 2,255,227 times
Reputation: 767
Quote:
Originally Posted by boxus View Post
Many companies have employees negotiate for vacation time, even the lowest paid menial jobs can negotiate.
Sure, they can negotiate, but that doesn't mean they'll be successful. I could ask my boss for 2 extra weeks, and that I want to take them at specific intervals, but that doesn't mean it'll happen.

Quote:
Originally Posted by boxus View Post
Job hopping for increased pay and/or responsibilites is a normal part of career progression. If the company wishes to retain you, then they will pay you more and/or promote you. Often, there are no promotion opportunities available, so the company gives lump sum bonuses to retian employees.
I suppose I'm from the old school who believes that longevity with a company is what employees strive for.

Quote:
Originally Posted by boxus View Post
A person will generally be paid more over their career if they move from company to company, rather than stay with the same company for many years. Reason is that hiring salaries in many fields increase with the market rate, however, merit increases will only amount to so much over a person's career. Companies are suppose to provide equity increases, but many fail to do so.
I agree that an employee will only increase their salary by small increments year after year with the same company IF they stay in the same position. But on the other side of that coin --- promotions are generally made internally, which equals a higher salary and better perks and the longer someone has been with a company, they more they know of the ins and outs and inner workings of the company over someone from the outside or an employee with less seniority/tenure with the company.

Quote:
Originally Posted by boxus View Post
As far as the negotiated salary; I would never give pay stubs to the employer, the employer has the market rate data for your position, I assure you they are not going to pay a new employee past this, or even past the middle market rate unless the employee is bringing exceptional talent to the business. In my opinion, it is just poor recruiting to base a salary off of a previous salary, can lead to all kinds of problems.
ITA. Never give your paystubs to a prospective employer. Fortunately, I've never been asked to "prove" my claim of salary by any potential employer, so I've never been faced with this and I'm surprised that in this day and age of privacy being so paramount in our lifestyles that an hiring manager would even ask for something that personal.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-28-2012, 11:13 AM
 
Location: New Orleans, LA
1,586 posts, read 1,919,004 times
Reputation: 1143
I've moved around IT for 8 years and so far have never heard of an employer wanting your check stubs.

Although, there are some unscrupulous employers in Texas that I wouldn't put it past.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-28-2012, 11:56 AM
 
6,473 posts, read 10,411,290 times
Reputation: 6347
Quote:
Originally Posted by rohirette View Post
Folks who have stayed at one company for a long time often - very often - make significantly less than those who have switched companies.

The world where staying put and expecting to get rewarded for it is gone.
Unless you live in Southern California. I met people who worked the same job since high school and they were married with teen kids. It didn't matter menial or professional either.

The legal secretaries traveled with their bosses to each new law firm they went to. Rarely did a litigation secretary with years of experience ever leave her job for more money. I saw ads for up to $80,000 a year.

You'd meet people who were security guards since forever. Union studio people who would never leave or move up in rank and why should they? Union people are guaranteed raises no matter what, so why knock yourself out?

This set up is vastly different from NYC where people would job hop after a couple of years TO MAKE MORE MONEY, because that is what YOU ARE SUPPOSED TO DO which is LOOK OUT FOR YOUR OWN INTERESTS.

Civil service union jobs are (or were) the best set up, because it takes an act of God to fire a city or governmental worker ANYWHERE in the US.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-28-2012, 12:04 PM
 
6,473 posts, read 10,411,290 times
Reputation: 6347
Quote:
Originally Posted by smarterguy View Post
I also learned loyality is for chumps after watching my brother, Uncle, and mother let go for almost nefarious reasons after busting their butts. When I accepted my first job, I had delusions that this compay would be like my father's, where he work for 25 years and made a good living. I have yet to encounter and private employer like that.
It is for "chumps" and everyone knows it.

I've read where recruiters and HR folks don't like "job hoppers", but that's only if you are UNEMPLOYED.

If you are CURRENTLY working, then it's not a problem, especially if they need your particular skill.

The people that tend to have the hardest time finding permanent work are those who've been temping for several years either due to their own choice or because they couldn't find permanent work.

This is so wrong, but this is what "honesty" gets you.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-28-2012, 12:11 PM
 
6,473 posts, read 10,411,290 times
Reputation: 6347
Quote:
Originally Posted by KABurke View Post
[color="Indigo"]ITA. Never give your paystubs to a prospective employer. Fortunately, I've never been asked to "prove" my claim of salary by any potential employer, so I've never been faced with this and I'm surprised that in this day and age of privacy being so paramount in our lifestyles that an hiring manager would even ask for something that personal.
I wouldn't give them to them either, but then again, if I had to, I would give out fake doctored ones and not give one damn about it.

I also wouldn't care if I got caught later either. The fact of the matter is that my paystubs, W2s and tax returns are NONE OF YOUR BUSINESS anyway.

Or I might give them copies with everything blacked out, except my name, social security number, pay period date and company name. All of my deductions, plus salary for that year or week would be BLOCKED OUT.

If they had a problem with this, then I would ask why do you need to see my personal information? We've already agreed on a salary range, so what is it you to see?

A poster in this thread (or another one on here) said that as soon as she showed them her paystubs, they lowballed her on salary. I think I read this again by someone else, but I don't remember.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-28-2012, 05:48 PM
 
Location: The City That Never Sleeps
2,043 posts, read 4,864,615 times
Reputation: 3336
There are tons of articles all over the Internet by writers, job experts and other self appointed know-it-alls that all requests for tax returns, paystubs or W2s are solely for the purpose of lowballing and discriminating.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment > Job Search
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top