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Old 07-15-2012, 09:32 PM
 
225 posts, read 597,808 times
Reputation: 128

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Greetings,
Iíve recently been interviewing for a position that Iím ambivalent on, and while nothing has been set yet, it seems very possible that I may receive an offer for.

One of my concerns with this position is the way the interviewing process has run. I know companies tend to not always be as well run with these things as they should, and that they often have the upper hand (especially in this economy), but these things are still two way streets, right? Especially when in cases like my own, the interviewee already has a job but is looking to ďbetterĒ his/her situation.

At the first interview, the hiring manger (whom I would report to) only met with me briefly to ask a few questions and had to run off to a meeting before I was able to ask any of my own. (I met with other individuals after). Then, in my second interview, the manager was 10 minutes late because of a meeting and then preceded to discuss how busy he/she is and take not one but two quick personal calls and send off a quick email. I canít imagine what would happen if I did something like this during an interview.

Now I know that this individual is extremely busy and overworked (why else would they be hiring), but I canít help but feel nervous about this behavior. Is it wrong to find this behavior concerning? This is a potential career step and more pay and there are other factors on both sides to consider. But would this particular issue be of concern to anyone else as well?
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Old 07-15-2012, 09:57 PM
 
Location: USA
4,980 posts, read 8,467,785 times
Reputation: 2506
Quote:
Originally Posted by NJHomebody View Post
Greetings,
I’ve recently been interviewing for a position that I’m ambivalent on, and while nothing has been set yet, it seems very possible that I may receive an offer for.

One of my concerns with this position is the way the interviewing process has run. I know companies tend to not always be as well run with these things as they should, and that they often have the upper hand (especially in this economy), but these things are still two way streets, right? Especially when in cases like my own, the interviewee already has a job but is looking to “better” his/her situation.

At the first interview, the hiring manger (whom I would report to) only met with me briefly to ask a few questions and had to run off to a meeting before I was able to ask any of my own. (I met with other individuals after). Then, in my second interview, the manager was 10 minutes late because of a meeting and then preceded to discuss how busy he/she is and take not one but two quick personal calls and send off a quick email. I can’t imagine what would happen if I did something like this during an interview.

Now I know that this individual is extremely busy and overworked (why else would they be hiring), but I can’t help but feel nervous about this behavior. Is it wrong to find this behavior concerning? This is a potential career step and more pay and there are other factors on both sides to consider. But would this particular issue be of concern to anyone else as well?

It IS a two-way street, although employers don't think so.

I've had that happen too, during an interview. I think we all would be gracious about an emergency, but
I don't think they are all emergencies.

When they say they are busy, they are trying to make their problems yours.


Since they haven't made you an offer yet, you can wait till that happens. If they made me an offer, I would say, "Great, love to take the job, but I had a few questions to ask, and there wasn't time with the last interview."

If these questions are important to you, I would try like heck to get them answered.

You said you're ambivalent on this job, so you must already be working. That would be my dealbreaker, I would not leave a sure thing unless you got all the information you wanted about the other job.
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Old 07-15-2012, 10:19 PM
 
Location: NJ
18,677 posts, read 17,157,068 times
Reputation: 7282
It is reasonable if an offer is presented to ask for a time before deciding where all of your questions could be answered.
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Old 07-16-2012, 05:33 AM
 
12,341 posts, read 15,301,495 times
Reputation: 8156
It used to be. In 1977 you interviewed as much to decide who YOU wanted to work for as much as to find one who would hire you.
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Old 07-16-2012, 06:24 AM
 
2,017 posts, read 4,990,794 times
Reputation: 1668
Quote:
Originally Posted by NJHomebody View Post
Greetings,
Iíve recently been interviewing for a position that Iím ambivalent on, and while nothing has been set yet, it seems very possible that I may receive an offer for.

One of my concerns with this position is the way the interviewing process has run. I know companies tend to not always be as well run with these things as they should, and that they often have the upper hand (especially in this economy), but these things are still two way streets, right? Especially when in cases like my own, the interviewee already has a job but is looking to ďbetterĒ his/her situation.

At the first interview, the hiring manger (whom I would report to) only met with me briefly to ask a few questions and had to run off to a meeting before I was able to ask any of my own. (I met with other individuals after). Then, in my second interview, the manager was 10 minutes late because of a meeting and then preceded to discuss how busy he/she is and take not one but two quick personal calls and send off a quick email. I canít imagine what would happen if I did something like this during an interview.

Now I know that this individual is extremely busy and overworked (why else would they be hiring), but I canít help but feel nervous about this behavior. Is it wrong to find this behavior concerning? This is a potential career step and more pay and there are other factors on both sides to consider. But would this particular issue be of concern to anyone else as well?
It is a two way street. You are there to interview the employer, the employer is there to interview you.

The employer knows this-- they don't always expect someone to accept every offer they make-- hence why they interview multiple people and rank them in their head of preference.

Granted, if you are applying at a low wage, low skilled job-- then the employer just doesn't really care. They are basically saying- here is the job, take it or leave it.

But with professional jobs with real career trajectories, they know that you may or may not say yes.
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Old 07-16-2012, 07:16 AM
 
Location: HoCo, MD
4,392 posts, read 8,049,790 times
Reputation: 4829
Definitely two way street. I've yet to go through an interview process where the hiring manager wasn't also trying to sell their organization. That said, it's all about people, and some have chips on their shoulder where they think they're (as well as the area they oversee) is the greatest thing.

Things come up all the time, but if you feel you are being pushed around or neglected as a potential hire, I would definitely look at that as a red flag. If this person is going to be your manager, how much support would you receive from him/her if you do end up working for there?
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Old 07-16-2012, 08:00 AM
 
Location: NJ
17,579 posts, read 39,964,759 times
Reputation: 16148
If you have unanswered questions I would send an email or call. It is a two way process. And if they won't participate as such I would cross them off my list.
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Old 07-16-2012, 08:03 AM
 
Location: USA
7,485 posts, read 5,831,885 times
Reputation: 12349
It should always be a two-way street, and if a company does a lousy job presenting itself in an interview, you have every right to question if you really wish to work there.

For example, one place at which I interviewed was completely clueless: the HR rep skipped out on two phone interviews with me, ignored my follow-ups in each case for a week, and then had an attitude when she finally got back to me. At the on-site interview, the engineering manager basically admitted the place was always behind schedule and in panic mode, which was embarassing. Finally, the company seemed to focus more on hiring young, cheap workers vs. people with experience. In the end, I didn't get that job and it's probably a good thing since that company was clearly clueless.

If you find yourself in a situation where you really don't trust the new company, don't make the jump, especially if you're already working someplace else.
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