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Old 07-16-2012, 07:55 PM
 
1,128 posts, read 3,093,528 times
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Since I'm trying to find an out of state job, I have been interviewing out of state and it's really stressful. In my last (and first) out of state interview, I got caught up in the anxiety, which lead to a bad interview. I just got called for another out of state interview for next week and I'm worried that my anxiety will ruin it. I do have the option of taking xanax (anti-anxiety medication) and/or propranolol (beta blocker). Last time I took about .15 mg of xanax and I think this time propranolol would be a good choice, but I don't have much experience with it.

Does anyone have any advice on beating those interview jitters?

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Old 07-16-2012, 08:48 PM
 
1,804 posts, read 7,007,960 times
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I had what I felt like was a very good interview on Friday. I don't know if they will hire me, but here is what I did to prepare:

1) I got a list of about 30 common job interview questions. I practiced answering them every morning for about 20 minutes. Yes, I was talking to myself, except one day when I was talking to my 1-year-old This was just to practice thinking on my feet, even though none of those questions were actually used in the interview.

2) I reviewed the job posting extensively and wrote down how I could fit the description.

3) I researched the company extensively and knew its history and strategy.

4) I went to a local employment office and did a mock interview there, and got feedback from the interviewer. I was a little nervous for the first couple minutes, but after that things loosened up.

I don't know how the interviewers felt I did, but it lasted for 1.5 hours and they asked for some follow up samples of my work.

Last edited by coolcats; 07-16-2012 at 08:56 PM..
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Old 07-16-2012, 08:51 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
29,839 posts, read 54,521,132 times
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Practice is the only real way. Apply for jobs you are not all that interested in just to get more experience with the traumatic
situation. When one comes along that you really want, everything will come easier. It doesn't help to practice with friends,
but maybe friends of friends, who you haven't met that hire people would be willing to give you some experience. I would not mess around with drugs, over the counter or otherwise. Experienced hiring managers can tell and that would definitely be a deal breaker.
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Old 07-16-2012, 09:10 PM
 
Location: NJ
17,579 posts, read 39,794,977 times
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I'm not sure anything other than doing lots of interviews will really help. Are you preparing for the interview properly? Doing all research you need to?
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Old 07-16-2012, 09:40 PM
 
1,128 posts, read 3,093,528 times
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Thanks everyone for the responses. Coolcats- I will try all of your suggestions, those are great!

I haven't prepared too much yet, but next week a family friend is going to help me with a mock interview.
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Old 07-16-2012, 10:42 PM
 
Location: NJ
17,579 posts, read 39,794,977 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CoolSocks View Post
Thanks everyone for the responses. Coolcats- I will try all of your suggestions, those are great!

I haven't prepared too much yet, but next week a family friend is going to help me with a mock interview.
Do you do your research on the company? Are you prepared to ask questions?
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Old 07-16-2012, 11:00 PM
 
1,128 posts, read 3,093,528 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by manderly6 View Post
Do you do your research on the company? Are you prepared to ask questions?
I still have two weeks, but yes, I've done some research.
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Old 07-17-2012, 12:19 AM
 
Location: California
4,402 posts, read 11,618,176 times
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This is excellent advice, and as it says a lot of what I would say I am going to lazily expand on it instead of writing my own....

Quote:
Originally Posted by coolcats View Post
I had what I felt like was a very good interview on Friday. I don't know if they will hire me, but here is what I did to prepare:

1) I got a list of about 30 common job interview questions. I practiced answering them every morning for about 20 minutes. Yes, I was talking to myself, except one day when I was talking to my 1-year-old This was just to practice thinking on my feet, even though none of those questions were actually used in the interview.

It is good to practice interviewing. I also advise people to read the articles that list the "odd" questions you could be asked. I also recommend developing a "reason" you are interviewing...you want to move to a new area, get out of retail, change careers, etc. That way you can have a fall back point for tough questions. I used to be in retail. When I transitioned out, it was after having to answer the question about having a lot of short term jobs. 2-3 years is short term in many industries but a while at the same retail job. The job that hired me was the one who, when asked about my "short" term jobs, I told them it was indicative of retail, and one of the reasons I was looking to leave. Both true and also targeted back to the "wanting to get out of retail" reason that I applied. It both gave credibility to my reason and justification for what they saw as a possible resume issue.

2) I reviewed the job posting extensively and wrote down how I could fit the description.

And make sure you tell the company that you have these skills. Knowing what they are looking for is one thing. Think of "this is how I handled it" stories that are true and show the reality. I recently started a new job (less than 6 months) and I had to not only interview but deal with my wedding being in September and needing time off. So, when the new company asked how I was with organizing large tasks, I told them I was planning my wedding, which is taking place halfway across the country, by email and phone. It showed I was both organized and got the wedding info out there so if there was an offer they were not surprised about the planning.

3) I researched the company extensively and knew its history and strategy.

Pull a few points out of this that appeal to you and mention that the info that you found on the website about (fill in with appropriate company info) the company was one of the reasons you applied. This works. People rarely do research on companies...the ones who do stand out in a good way.

4) I went to a local employment office and did a mock interview there, and got feedback from the interviewer. I was a little nervous for the first couple minutes, but after that things loosened up.

Good advice and good practice.

I don't know how the interviewers felt I did, but it lasted for 1.5 hours and they asked for some follow up samples of my work.

Sounds like it went well. Best of luck to both of you.
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Old 07-17-2012, 12:21 AM
 
Location: California
4,402 posts, read 11,618,176 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CoolSocks View Post
I still have two weeks, but yes, I've done some research.
My favorite "do you have any questions for me" answer is to ask the interviewer why they love working for the company. It usually not only gets a positive response, but also virtually guarantees that you will leave the interview on a positive note. When the interviewer thinks back on all interviews, this matters. You can say it doesn't, but the interviewer may also have to work with the new hire...they want the ones that made them feel positive.
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Old 07-17-2012, 09:55 AM
 
1,128 posts, read 3,093,528 times
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Thebunny- great advice! A lot of good preparation tips, thanks!
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