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Old 07-23-2012, 08:07 AM
 
Location: NW San Antonio
2,953 posts, read 8,624,443 times
Reputation: 3211

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Quote:
Originally Posted by hnsq View Post
That gets fuzzy only if they do not specify a time period in which you need to make the decision. In the absence of a written time period, they should give you a "reasonable amount of time" to consider the offer (I forget offhand, and don't have the time to dig into my notes, I am pretty sure it is two weeks in cases like this), after they have given it in written form. What constitutes a "reasonable amount of time" would be up to a judge to decide.

Since they said, in writing, that the OP has two days to decide though, they can give the offer to someone else after two days. If they gave it to someone else and rescind the offer after only one day, then the OP would have a case.
Fuzzy?? only thing fuzzy here is you passing off yourself as an expert. an offer is an offer, they can take it back as soon as they mailed it. Until the offer is accepted it is just that, a Unilateral offer. A job offer made, is just that, a job offer. Doesn't mean a legal contract at all. He could call them back and state he is accepting and they can tell him its no longer available. A case? Sue someone for offering a job and then not having it. Happens all time, someone inside the company gets the job, so they cancel all offers.
A judge to decide, loss, punitive damage? please.
Has No Serious Quality.
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Old 07-23-2012, 08:49 AM
 
9,856 posts, read 13,422,480 times
Reputation: 5453
Quote:
Originally Posted by sinsativ View Post
Fuzzy?? only thing fuzzy here is you passing off yourself as an expert. an offer is an offer, they can take it back as soon as they mailed it. Until the offer is accepted it is just that, a Unilateral offer. A job offer made, is just that, a job offer. Doesn't mean a legal contract at all. He could call them back and state he is accepting and they can tell him its no longer available. A case? Sue someone for offering a job and then not having it. Happens all time, someone inside the company gets the job, so they cancel all offers.
A judge to decide, loss, punitive damage? please.
Has No Serious Quality.
With all due respect, you don't seem to know what you are talking about.
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Old 07-23-2012, 09:52 AM
 
57 posts, read 226,682 times
Reputation: 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by hnsq View Post
With all due respect, you don't seem to know what you are talking about.
Not really. He's quite right in that a job offer isn't a binding contract of employment. The company can easily decide they want to hire internally or cancel the job opening entirely. You can't sue a company for rescinding a job offer. I was offered a position months ago only to find out 2 days before I was to start that they filled the position internally. I wouldn't have any case to take to court.
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Old 07-23-2012, 03:37 PM
 
156 posts, read 466,623 times
Reputation: 183
OP, you can verbally ask them if there is any flexibility in their offer and that the base salary is low. When you state this, do not talk too much. Just say it is low and ask if there is any flexibility. Then stop and let them talk - they will either say there is no flexibility or they will try to assess what your magic number is. With an offer at this stage, you and they both don't want much back and forth. If they are flexible, you need to work with them to arrive at a number that satisfies you both - remember that you are the candidate they chose so you do have some leverage. Be open and state your concerns / reasons if they ask. You may need to propose a number first - if so, propose a number a little higher than you hope to get. Its ok to have some verbal back and forth when you speak with them - you just need to arrive at an agreeable number so they can send you one last formal offer letter. At this stage, if you agree to a number and they send you another letter, you are pretty much locked in. If you go back and try to negotiate more, it may not be looked upon favorable - so negotiate carefully and to your minimum acceptable level during your verbal discussion.

Good Luck!
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