U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment > Job Search
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-26-2012, 10:29 PM
 
93 posts, read 150,740 times
Reputation: 51

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by goldenchild08 View Post
I think it varies greatly on a lot of things. Some areas of the country have been hit harder than others by the economic downturn. People in Michigan, California and Florida complaining how hard it is to find work is not surprising. However, every square inch of this country has a very poor job market. It also depends on what type of work you are looking for and what types of companies you are applying to. It is exceedingly hard to get a federal government job because of all the hoops you have to jump through. Applying for desk jobs at big companies is also difficult because everyone wants to be a cubicle farmer at a big company. It is hard getting a decent job at a small company because small companies are trending to lay-off more workers than hire new ones.

In the OP's case of applying to places like fast food restaurants and supermarkets and the like, it is also a gamble. I've noticed that hiring managers at fast food restaurants, warehouses, grocery stores ect. tend to hire their own kind. Not being racist, but everyone reading this has walked into a Safeway, McDonald's, Popeyes etc. where all the workers at the joint just happened to be the same race as the manager. Everyone who works at the local Safeway in my town is Black and my town is only about 25% Black. Everyone who works at the McDonald's in the mall in my town is Central American (i.e. Mexican or Salvadoran or Honduran ect.). Of course this is not always the case, but there is no denying that there is some truth to this observation.

Many small businesses hire people much differently than big companies and the government. I have been applying to many fairly new start-up companies via craigslist. Many of these businesses do not conduct drug tests or have all the same pointless red tape as big companies. The last place where I got hired was for a small company doing web design. The job did not turn out to be long-term. However, the boss hired me simply due to the fact that I was the first person who applied to the job. This is pretty rare. A major drawback of working for a small start-up company is that you might be hired easily but you have to ultimately prove your worth to these small businesses by initially starting work for a low wage. Once you start helping a small company make money, you prove your worth to them and they start to pay you a real salary accordingly. It sucks but you have to work your way up from the bottom even if you are lucky enough to get that break to work for peanuts.
and I live in Southern California, Orange County, and i've been applying for minimum-wage jobs at Walmart, Target, Grocery Stores, Home-Depot, OSH, Lowe's, retail clothing stores, movie theaters, fast-food places like McDonald's, and i'm struggling to get hired at them, seriously, i would absolutely take an 8 dollar an hour job, thats how desperate i am, but i'm not getting hired at them.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-27-2012, 12:26 AM
 
1,378 posts, read 1,815,083 times
Reputation: 980
Quote:
Originally Posted by annerk View Post
It could be any number of things, but bottom line, there is a candidate that they liked better. You might have great interview skills but someone else has more experience. You might have great previous experience but another applicant might have a personality that the hiring manager preferred. You might speak English, Spanish and Mandarin, but someone else might speak those languages plus Russian and Creole. Your shoes might remind the manager of his sisters jerk of an ex-boyfriend. There are too many variable to determine what the reason is.

My advice is to find a neutral person to do a mock interview with. Someone honest who doesn't know you too well. A friend of a friend, your neighbors sister-in-law, someone who can give honest feedback without bias.
The best answer in this thread. The OP probably isn't doing anything wrong at all in the interviews but since this is such a competitive market, there are factors that are completely out of his control that are leading to no offers. The thing is interviews aren't always the decisive factor and people are willing to overlook a mediocre interview if the person is exceedingly well qualified for the job.

Quote:
Originally Posted by annerk View Post
Let's say I had three final candidates for a f/t retail job at a trendy clothing store that catered to tween and teenage girls. (think Justice, Delia's, etc.)

Candidate #1 was a recent college grad with a major in English. She had three years experience in retail while in high school. She was pleasant but seemed somewhat reserved. She wore navy dress slacks, a white blouse, and navy flats to the interview.

Candidate #2 had a high school diploma. She had three years of retail experience and is a third keyholder at her current job. She had a perky personality, very bubbly but not ditzy. She wore a pair of black "skinny" pants with a bright fuscia top and "statement necklace," and black 4" heels to the interview.

Candidate #3 had a college degree in biology. She had recently completed a paid post-graduate internship at a pharmaceutical company. She had four years of retail experience in high school and college. She had an outgoing personality. She wore a grey flannel suit, pink blouse, and black low heeled pumps to the interview.

All three are obviously qualified. Now go back to the type of retail store I'm managing and hiring for.

Which one am I going to hire?
The answer is pretty obvious, you are going to hire Candidate #2 since she "fits" the position more than the others. Also, to the OP, getting an interview means you can do the job. It is just that interviewers interview multiple candidates to hedge against unknown factors such as the lead candidate not accepting for a myriad of reasons.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-27-2012, 04:36 AM
 
Location: The City That Never Sleeps
2,043 posts, read 4,862,813 times
Reputation: 3336
Interviewing many times is subjective. We all know some people get hired based solely on looks or who they know. Or the fake stuff on their resume. Some people also can talk up a game at the interview but are lousy workers. I wouldn't beat yourself up about it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-27-2012, 06:49 AM
 
841 posts, read 1,663,252 times
Reputation: 1164
I've been reading up on this and they say if it between you and someone else, they will hire the person who fits in their culture better.

At last that explains why I was runner up in a few jobs when I lived in a different state---they hired a local over me, and said they liked me, but they hired a "native" of the area.

Hang in there, buddy. One of these interviews will work out.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-27-2012, 07:12 AM
 
93 posts, read 150,740 times
Reputation: 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mystique13 View Post
Interviewing many times is subjective. We all know some people get hired based solely on looks or who they know. Or the fake stuff on their resume. Some people also can talk up a game at the interview but are lousy workers. I wouldn't beat yourself up about it.
well the fact i've at least been getting job interviews lately is something entirely new to me, for a very long time i could not even get a job interview in the first place, so i must be doing something right that is causing me to at least get interviews, and i am not aware, do not know what it is that is making me get job interviews
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-27-2012, 07:18 AM
 
26,590 posts, read 54,607,588 times
Reputation: 13019
Quote:
Originally Posted by chef.sunny22 View Post
I've been reading up on this and they say if it between you and someone else, they will hire the person who fits in their culture better.

At last that explains why I was runner up in a few jobs when I lived in a different state---they hired a local over me, and said they liked me, but they hired a "native" of the area.

Hang in there, buddy. One of these interviews will work out.
Far too often an employer gets burned by extending an offer to an out of town candidate who a week after accepting the offer really looks at the cost of living in the new area, the cost of moving, the challenges of finding new day care, health care, etc. and decides to stay put.

Pretty much the only time we consider out of town candidates is if they are getting ready to finish their military career. They are used to moving and settling in to new areas and the military pays for their move.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-27-2012, 07:56 AM
 
4,424 posts, read 5,457,497 times
Reputation: 6505
Im an honest person so when im asked a question at an interview i answer honestly. This is what id want as an employer so i do that same thing as a potential employee. Am i a hard worker? yes. Do i focus on quality or quantity? Quality. id rather take my time and do it right the first time than do a messed up job in a hurry that i have to redo multiple times. Am i willing to work overtime? Yes but you have to request it of me. Dont expect me to show up 2 hours early every day just because. Am I a team player? I do my job they do their job. If someone asks me for help then i will help them but dont think im going to run around doing everyones job for them all the time for no reason just so i can be labeled a team player. What do i think the goal of the company should be? To make the customers happy, of course. You make the customers happy with quality long lasting product and great customer service and youll get tons of business which brings you money. It isnt make product as fast as possible, hurry up and get it on the shelves, and get $$$ from these people. You may have a ton of your product on the shelves but if its not worth crap we're going to tell everyone we know not to buy any of it. Answers such as those have gotten me praise for my honesty but rarely the job. Im not going to change my work ethic though.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-27-2012, 09:18 AM
 
69 posts, read 87,679 times
Reputation: 62
At my last inteview two weeks ago they followed up and told me they wanted people that were less entrepeneurial, otherwise they would have offered me the job she said.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-27-2012, 09:23 AM
 
93 posts, read 150,740 times
Reputation: 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by chef.sunny22 View Post
I've been reading up on this and they say if it between you and someone else, they will hire the person who fits in their culture better.

At last that explains why I was runner up in a few jobs when I lived in a different state---they hired a local over me, and said they liked me, but they hired a "native" of the area.

Hang in there, buddy. One of these interviews will work out.
I asked similiar questions about this issue on a different site, asking what makes a person get a job interview in the first place? or what makes a person get job interviews but not get hired, and these were the responses I got:

"I used to work in a Human Resources Dept. of a local government agency.You've guessed it right -- the application (with or without resume) is simply an elimination process: finding the applicants who meet the minimum qualifications. In my agency, we merely qualified the applicants and then sent them on to the hiring department. The hiring dept. selected those to be interviewed. How you present yourself in your resume is important, but the interview is the most important. During the interview you can clarify anything in your resume, or explain something that the employer doesn't understand. (Example: why did you leave your last employer?)
You need to be prepared for questions like that. Other questions to think about: where do you see yourself in five, ten years? Specifics about experience. Specifics about your knowledge of your employer's business. Don't babble or take over the conversation; even though you're nervous as hell, try to appear calm. And last but now least, dress appropriately! No jeans, no tee shirt; casual slacks such as dockers okay, but with a sports jacket, collared shirt, socks and loafers (or whatever men wear these days for business).
Mind your manners -- as the interviewer approaches, you rise from your seat to greet the interviewer; shake hands, say how-do-you-do, and SMILE! as though you're happy to be there. Don't overdo it -- you don't want to appear to be a suck-up. Good luck."

"Getting a job interview happens when your resume or application looks good to the HR department or hiring manager. You have relevant work experience, education, show longevity in jobs, that kind of thing. The decision to hire or not is made during the interview. You must present yourself well, dress appropriately for the job you are interviewing for-I work in food manufacturing and once interviewed a candidate who showed up in a skirt and open toed shoes. She looked nice, but I couldn't even take her on a plant tour, so it was a short interview and she didn't get the job.

Make sure the to listen to the question the interviewer is asking, and don't interrupt. Give a well thought out answer with specific examples (if appropriate), but don't talk too much or babble. Nobody wants to say bad things in an interview, but there are some questions designed to see if you will give an honest answer or not. If asked about your weaknesses, don't give an answer like "I work too hard" or something similar. That's a suck up answer and not what the interviewer is looking for. They really want to know how you are working to improve yourself on something you know is a weakness.

Smile, make eye contact, be engaged in the interview. Do your homework on the company and think about or even write down some questions you have about the job. If you can't think of anything else, always ask about things like advancement potential, the biggest challenges facing the position, the company, etc., what a typical day would be like, those kinds of things. Do your best to find a connection with the person giving the interview-they will hire people they like 9 times out of 10, even if you're not 100% qualified for the job.

Find someone you can do practice interviews with, like a family member or friend, preferable someone who has either done hiring or worked in HR. Have them give you brutally honest feedback about where you can improve. Maybe you don't answer questions well, maybe you don't present yourself well, maybe you have a deer in the headlights look when asked a question, whatever your weaknesses are they can help you identify and correct them."

"Resume gets you in the door
application does nothing for any kind of skilled or professional job.
their interview performance is what gets someone hired.

It sounds like you are not presenting yourself well in the interview. Google to find interview workshops in your area, to see how they can help.

Another thing is that networking is the best way to find a position. If you are competiting against people who have been personally referred to the company, it will be harder for you to get the job. Start doing your own networking."

"I believe you need to up your game meaning conducting mock interviews with a mature employed or once employed i.e. family friend, relative, a friend's parents etc. A mock interview is where someone will ask you several interview questions and then provide constructive criticism on i.e. responses, length of time it took you to respond, were you confident in your responses, did you ask any questions at the end of the interview.

Next is your attire, if finances are a problem, then visit Goodwill, Salvation Army, Consignment Shops where they receive barely used or new clothing for very reasonable prices. Invest in a two piece skirt or pant matching suit in navy, grey or black, a long sleeve white blouse (not sheer) OR dress black pant or skirt, low heels polished or flats in black, no heavy makeup or loud nair color, soft fragrance or none the interviewer might have allergies a simple scarf or one strand necklace, no heavy makeup, nails manicured clear or pale nail polish, hair in a simple style no wild colors, remove nose piercings (if any).

Arrive 15 minutes prior to the interview, smile and shake hands with the interviewer when introduced and at the end of the interview thanking him or her.

Facebook: Change the settings to make your page PRIVATE

Most importantly, many people have secured jobs after going to this website, google a free website called glassdoor.com and enter the company name to view i.e. interview experiences/tips, interview questions, employee reviews of jobs shared by applicants who interviewed and received job offers, some did not but learned from the experience.

It appears the information you provide on your job applications are attracting prospective employers now take it up a notch and you will succeed. Good Luck!"

"
The decision to hire you or not is made by the interviewer within the first minute of the interview. He/She already knows if they want to hire you.

If the interview drags or seems boring or has silent moments, you are not getting the job.

I have interviewed many people over the years for various positions and all of my counterparts who did the same thing agree with me. The decision is made the minute they look at you and hear you speak.

My advice: Make that first couple of minutes count for everything." this was said by a former HR Manager

"You generally get an interview based on how you look on paper, and you get the job based on how you come across in person. It could be how you speak, it could be how you look, it could be how you present yourself"

These are the answers I got where I also asked this question regarding why i'm getting job interviews but not getting hired, but how do I know if it is my interview performance, the way I present myself during interviews that is preventing me from getting hired? because employers do not really specifically tell prospective employees, interviewees why they were not hired.

Because i'm at least getting job interviews but i'm not getting hired, my last job was at Target last Fall, unfortuneately it was only a seasonal temporary job, i've explained this before so people should know already.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-27-2012, 10:23 AM
 
4,424 posts, read 5,457,497 times
Reputation: 6505
Remember when the interview process was this:

"Are you a hard worker?"

"Yes, Sir, I am"

"Can you start tomorrow?"

"Yes, Sir, I can"

"Welcome to the team"
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment > Job Search
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top