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Old 08-06-2012, 10:51 AM
Status: "I hate living in Georgia!!" (set 13 days ago)
 
48,148 posts, read 45,495,400 times
Reputation: 15338

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Quote:
I hate to break it to you but the real world in America is an incredibly unforgiving place for recent college grads. You just graduated college a few days ago. There are people who graduated years ago who still can't find any work at all. I graduated in December 2009. I have been unemployed for two years and it has been the hardest two years of my life. In the past six years, approximately half of all college grads are unemployed or underemployed.

College Grads Struggle To Gain Financial Footing : NPR
This is part of why I've considered leaving the country and living somewhere abroad. However, the way visas work, I don't know.I have considering leaving America to find work elsewhere. However, I can't afford to leave.

And being unemployed since 2009, this makes me wonder "when does it get better"?

This is the problem. I can find job postings, but most require experience. I get so angry because I feel like no one wants the newly graduated to work. It feels like "we have ours, so forget you". How is a person suppose to get experience if he can't get any?

Quote:
This economy is a wake-up call for millions of college grads. Yes, we all had big dreams. I thought that when I graduated college, I would be working and living in New York City around cool people living the dream. But a dream is just that, a dream; not reality. In reality, only lucky people with connections and the exceptionally skilled and most talented young people, period, are finding good jobs. Many times, the latter doesn't even cut it. The vast majority of us are average in skills, intelligence and ability. Where does that leave the rest of us? Out in the cold.
I'm not that lucky. Even the connections I have don't seem to be enough. I had an internship making a map for a national park. I used GPS and integrated GIS with GPS. So what you're saying is that people like us are left out in the cold? What next? I didn't go to college only to work at a department store or the store.

Quote:
Don't beat yourself up. And don't look at moving back with your parents as a bad thing. Nothing worth having comes easily. Expect to send out hundreds to thousands of resumes with no response. Expect to show up to more interviews than you can count on your fingers and toes only to get rejected. There is nothing wrong with a little struggle. You might have to take a low wage job or deal with bouts of unemployment and see old friends easily succeed without trying while you continue to struggle. Life is unfair. Struggle builds character and will make you a survivor in the end. People who have been handed everything in life don't appreciate anything and are intolerable to talk to or be around. In America, we rightfully make heroes of people who take on getting dealt a bad hand but still become successful in the face of terrible odds and adversity. This is the reason why millions of Americans love Bill Clinton, Barack Obama and Jay-Z.
I get upset because of all of the work and the money I put into my education. I was willing to go into debt for a college degree. Now I'm being told that my college degree means nothing. For me it is very personal. Other people might be going through it. But for me, it is very personal. I was more than happy to go into debt. Why? For me, it was an investment. Now I'm left wondering if it really was a waste of time. My father has told me "get your education. You don't want to work lifting paint for someone or doing some kind of menial labor". My father has a college degree(he got it back in the late 1970s). He got a job straight away. He was laid off after a few years. However, today, he is working, in his field. He was an example of what someone with a college degree could do. This is how I look at it. I went to college because I didn't want to spent my adult like working at a department store stocking merchandise or working on a construction site. I know what some people have told me. People have said "it's honest work". I have no doubt that it's honest labor. However, it isn't for ME. I could never be happy doing that work. If I wanted that kind of work, I would have drop out of high school. I wouldn't have worked as hard to get into college. I wouldn't have struggled with the all-nighters. I rode a bicycle nearly 5 miles to my internship, just because I had to. I was willing to do it because I thought of it as an investment, something that would lead to something better. I was willing to do it on top of my student job and 3 other classes in order to get my degree. My father was there to help whenever he could(and he works in another state, so he has to pay for expenses in 2 places, which can do damage to a paycheck). I was willing to go through all of that feeling that it would soon be worth it. Now I'm hearing that voice in the back saying "you wasted your time. you could have gotten a perfectly good job at the store or as a forklift". I went to college so I wouldn't have to do jobs like that. They aren't for me.

Living with my parents is something I'm trying to prevent. I don't have a car. I barely know how to drive. My parents live out on the fringes of suburbia(the exurbs). For me, it's a big problem. If my parents lived much closer to the city, then maybe I wouldn't be so disturbed about it. It isn't so much about living at my parents house. It's more about where they live. I don't have a car. I barely know how to drive(and I get nervous behind the wheel), and the nearest place within one mile is a gas station. At least where I've currently living, there are more places to be. Where my parents live, there isn't much to do. I would go nuts being bored. My parents got a house out there because at the time, they had children(the oldest was 11, that would be me). They wanted a quiet place. Now it's outlived its purpose, and my father hates living there too. The problem is that it's hard to sell a house in this market.
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Old 08-06-2012, 10:53 AM
Status: "I hate living in Georgia!!" (set 13 days ago)
 
48,148 posts, read 45,495,400 times
Reputation: 15338
Quote:
Originally Posted by dazeddude8 View Post
you and about every other college grad has the same plan, is thinking the same thing. No, and I mean NO college grads wants to as you put it "live that life", no one wants to graduate, be unemployed and living with the parents again.

That being said you did have a past internship which sets you apart from most that graduate with only a degree. I recomend keep looking for the entry level, the unpaid internship concering your major, however in the mean time look for a part time job. yes that means shop rite, target, block buster etc... Something to make money in the meantime until you land the ideal/dream position.
I did have my internship. It should set me apart. However, so do alot of other people in my field. I am looking at entry level work. So far I'm having a hard time finding the entry level jobs.
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Old 08-07-2012, 06:47 AM
 
1,544 posts, read 2,068,212 times
Reputation: 1185
The entry level will be hard and unless you hit some sort of miracle luck you will proably be searching for quite some time. It sucks I know, and I wish there was a some magic secret I could offer that would get you that entry level work- truth be told I am still looking for that "secret". All i can offer is, attend the career fairs, work/volunteer in something even if it is unrelated to your major. The hope is that my past internship expereince and whatever minimum wage job I have now will be enough to get my "ideal" entry level job.
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Old 08-07-2012, 08:33 AM
 
Location: Plymouth, MN
308 posts, read 766,370 times
Reputation: 383
Quote:
Originally Posted by green_mariner View Post
On Tuesday I received my BA in Geography. I couldn't have been happier. Now reality is setting in. I have been having trouble finding any work. I have been turned down from so many jobs. Every job I've looked up, it requires at least 2 or 3 years experience, maybe more. Right now I'm looking for jobs in cartography, GIS, surveying, and other things related to geography. Finding a posting that takes a geography degree isn't the problem. Finding a job that doesn't require experience is next to impossible. I'm willing to relocate out of state. In fact, I want to. However, the problem is finding anything. I'm wondering what is going to happen to other college students right now.
join the club of millions!

I am not saying that you have a worthless degree, but it will be a very much an uphill battle for you to find any meaningfull employment any time soon, especially if you don't have relevant prior job experience. internships are great, but most student do them as well, so it doesnt set you apart all that much.
you should probably take comfort in knowing that majority of your fellow graduates will be on the same boat.

have you thought about doing a masters degree? you might as well sit this recession out and get more education which will truly set you apart.

PS: I wonder if the military would hire you for your ability to read/make maps, etc.
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Old 08-07-2012, 08:37 AM
Status: "I hate living in Georgia!!" (set 13 days ago)
 
48,148 posts, read 45,495,400 times
Reputation: 15338
Quote:
Originally Posted by pzrOrange View Post
join the club of millions!

I am not saying that you have a worthless degree, but it will be a very much an uphill battle for you to find any meaningfull employment any time soon, especially if you don't have relevant prior job experience. internships are great, but most student do them as well, so it doesnt set you apart all that much.
you should probably take comfort in knowing that majority of your fellow graduates will be on the same boat.

PS: I wonder if the military would hire you for your ability to read/make maps, etc.
I tried joining the military. I broke my spine 4 years ago. The military won't take me because I'm considered a liability.
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Old 08-07-2012, 09:18 AM
 
Location: Plymouth, MN
308 posts, read 766,370 times
Reputation: 383
masters degree it is then .
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Old 08-07-2012, 10:03 AM
Status: "I hate living in Georgia!!" (set 13 days ago)
 
48,148 posts, read 45,495,400 times
Reputation: 15338
Quote:
Originally Posted by pzrOrange View Post
masters degree it is then .
Which means more years of school. I was hoping to get my bachelor's, get a decent job and work for about 2 years, then get a master's degree.
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Old 08-07-2012, 11:45 AM
Status: "I hate living in Georgia!!" (set 13 days ago)
 
48,148 posts, read 45,495,400 times
Reputation: 15338
I was talking to another person about how he got his job. He had connections through his internship. What is getting me is why my connections don't seem to work for me. I was hoping that my work with the National Park Service would have helped. Right now I'm trying to get another job through connections. So far the process is working very slow. Maybe it might work out. However, it feels like even with connections, it isn't enough. In fact, the internship I had, that was nothing short of a miracle. I had to convince someone that they needed my cartographic skills. I was about to go into another semester without an internship. I've tried getting jobs through connections. It has almost never worked for me. It has only worked maybe once or twice. Most of the time, I get the jobs because there happens to be room for me.

Because of my experience with jobs, I've considered starting my own business. In fact, I tried it this summer. It failed. I didn't make any money. The only client I could get basically didn't need my services after a while. This is what I have to work with: A computer, an ArcGIS 10.1 software, and AutoCAD maps. I'm learning how to use AutoCAD, and I know how to use ArcGIS. That is all I have at the moment.
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Old 08-07-2012, 01:01 PM
Status: "I hate living in Georgia!!" (set 13 days ago)
 
48,148 posts, read 45,495,400 times
Reputation: 15338
I have an interview tomorrow. Finally something is coming up. I just hope I get the job. It isn't geography-related, but it's not food services either.
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Old 08-07-2012, 01:01 PM
 
Location: The Bay and Maryland
1,362 posts, read 3,193,329 times
Reputation: 2148
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I went to college because I didn't want to spent my adult like working at a department store stocking merchandise or working on a construction site. I know what some people have told me. People have said "it's honest work". I have no doubt that it's honest labor. However, it isn't for ME. I could never be happy doing that work. If I wanted that kind of work, I would have drop out of high school.
That's the problem with me. I would gladly work as a garbage man. Many garbage men get paid a lot better than you think. They don't have the stress of white collar "career work" where you may practically have to be on-call 24-7 by a nagging boss or nagging clients. But all the garbage men where I live seem to be illegal immigrants who can't speak any English. I would work many of these "low status" jobs because many of them pay well and your work ends as soon as you get off the clock. But the Boomers created the idea that these jobs were shameful and to be looked down upon. As a result, we were told by our Boomer parents and the like to "go to college so you won't get your hands dirty like a loser". In effect, everyone and their brother went to college while illegal immigrants began to dominate honest manual labor jobs. Today, it seems like it is much easier for an illegal immigrant to come to America and start making money (sometimes good money making six figures hauling junk) very quickly doing all sorts of jobs that our parents made us ashamed to do. It is so hard to get a job as a college grad for a reason. Not too long ago, college was a luxury only reserved for the rich gentry class in this country or the exceptionally intelligent. Rich kids got jobs easily because of Mommy and Daddy's connections and the exceptionally intelligent college grads got jobs easily because a college degree was much rarer and actually meant something once upon a time.

5 Ways We Ruined the Occupy Wall Street Generation | Cracked.com
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