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Old 08-06-2012, 02:04 PM
 
9,856 posts, read 13,438,715 times
Reputation: 5453

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Quote:
Originally Posted by 313Weather View Post
Employers, when searching for an employee to fill a position, STOP saying a particular skill set is a "HUGE plus" or "Preferred." Stating something's a plus or preferred implies that it's not necessary and you can teach it to them, but very nice to have.

Yet, you have the nerve to get upset when you can't find someone with that particular skill set amongst applicants, or folks apply without that particular skill set because YOU don't know how to fill positions.

If, without question or exception, you want someone with a particular skill set, state clearly in the ad that it's REQUIRED, not a "HUGE plus" or "Preferred.". You'll save yourself time/money and you'll save the applicant time/money.
Let's suppose you are a manager and have an opening. You have an ideal candidate, however realize that it will be very difficult to find someone with an ideal fit. You have about five skills/characteristics that you are willing to compromise on, if it comes to it.

How would you word the job posting so that you have the best chance of getting your perfect candidate, while minimizing the concessions you have to make? After all, the person who you hire will be determining your worth as a boss for the next several years.
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Old 08-06-2012, 02:06 PM
 
7,238 posts, read 10,909,254 times
Reputation: 5583
Quote:
Originally Posted by boxus View Post
They do this to add flexibility to the hiring process, and to insulate themselves from things like EEO suits.

If they would put the preferred items under required, and they hired a guy that had all but one of those requirements, the company will leave the door open to EEO suits as the company did not "follow policy", thus the gov will determine that none of the requirements are really required. So if there was a hiring complaint, or an audit, the company has now exposed themselves to an EEO finding.
That doesn't make any sense.

EEO is protection from discrimination by Age, Race, Sex, Religion, etc.

What does stating "RealComp experience is required" versus "RealComp experience is preferred" have to do with EEO protection?
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Old 08-06-2012, 02:17 PM
 
7,238 posts, read 10,909,254 times
Reputation: 5583
Quote:
Originally Posted by hnsq View Post
Let's suppose you are a manager and have an opening. You have an ideal candidate, however realize that it will be very difficult to find someone with an ideal fit. You have about five skills/characteristics that you are willing to compromise on, if it comes to it.

How would you word the job posting so that you have the best chance of getting your perfect candidate, while minimizing the concessions you have to make? After all, the person who you hire will be determining your worth as a boss for the next several years.
If I already know without a shadow of a doubt that I won't hire anyone without a specific skill set, I wouldn't say in an ad having it is simply a plus, I would say it's required.

On the other hand, if I said to my applicants that having a particular skill set is merely a plus, and there's at least one applicant who meets all of the other qualifications except having that particular skill set, I would hire them and teach it to them.

I wouldn't decide not to hire them because they don't have that one particular skill set, re-post the job ad 20 times which still says having the particular skill set is merely a plus and them whine to the media and on job forums that workers aren't skilled enough.
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Old 08-06-2012, 02:30 PM
 
Location: N26.03 W80.11
326 posts, read 829,402 times
Reputation: 326
I've noticed a lot of jobs where I live strongly prefer candidates who speak Spanish and English fluently. I think that they mean you pretty much HAVE to speak Spanish and English fluently. Is this discriminatory?
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Old 08-06-2012, 04:50 PM
 
Location: Dallas TX
15,036 posts, read 21,776,428 times
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The job posting doesn't make sense (not sure if the OP copied it wrong), it states experience is a plus and required?

Experience with RealComp is a HUGE plus. Administrative experience and Real Estate experience REQUIRED
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Old 08-06-2012, 04:52 PM
 
Location: Dallas TX
15,036 posts, read 21,776,428 times
Reputation: 22262
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2ForTheSea View Post
I've noticed a lot of jobs where I live strongly prefer candidates who speak Spanish and English fluently. I think that they mean you pretty much HAVE to speak Spanish and English fluently. Is this discriminatory?
I don't think so if they are looking for someone who is biligual. Depending on where you live, if you speak only English, you can only communicate with a part of the population, thus someone who is bilingual is a plus
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Old 08-06-2012, 05:00 PM
 
Location: North Fulton
1,039 posts, read 2,043,555 times
Reputation: 600
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2ForTheSea View Post
I've noticed a lot of jobs where I live strongly prefer candidates who speak Spanish and English fluently. I think that they mean you pretty much HAVE to speak Spanish and English fluently. Is this discriminatory?
Probably not, speaking another language is considered a skill set. All jobs requirements are somewhat discriminating, of course, whether or not the descriptions break the law may vary from region to region.
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Old 08-06-2012, 05:00 PM
 
Location: N26.03 W80.11
326 posts, read 829,402 times
Reputation: 326
Quote:
Originally Posted by veuvegirl View Post
I don't think so if they are looking for someone who is biligual. Depending on where you live, if you speak only English, you can only communicate with a part of the population, thus someone who is bilingual is a plus
Since I don't speak Spanish I am thankful I am not looking for a job here. However, I know a couple of people who are and get very frustrated by this preference. I didn't think it would be illegal since the U.S. has no official language, but didn't know if it would be discriminatory since an employer cannot discriminate against race.
It only makes sense to be bilingual for customer service jobs here.
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Old 08-06-2012, 05:10 PM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
37,162 posts, read 45,714,466 times
Reputation: 61887
Quote:
Originally Posted by 313Weather View Post
That doesn't make any sense.

EEO is protection from discrimination by Age, Race, Sex, Religion, etc.

What does stating "RealComp experience is required" versus "RealComp experience is preferred" have to do with EEO protection?
All I saw is the age part. I am older. I have a job in which I was exemplary, and have the evaluations to prove it. I am being let go because my job description is being eliminated. Lie, because the new person has the same job description. I live in a right to work state, they can, apparently, just fire you and give a reason that is not true.
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Old 08-06-2012, 05:14 PM
 
7,238 posts, read 10,909,254 times
Reputation: 5583
Quote:
Originally Posted by veuvegirl View Post
The job posting doesn't make sense (not sure if the OP copied it wrong), it states experience is a plus and required?

Experience with RealComp is a HUGE plus. Administrative experience and Real Estate experience REQUIRED
Nope, I copied the ad straight from Craigslist.

RealComp I assume is some type of software.

What is required is Administrative and Real Estate experience, while they say having RealComp experience is only a plus.
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