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Old 08-06-2012, 01:08 PM
 
7,238 posts, read 10,891,939 times
Reputation: 5583

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Quote:
Real Estate office is looking for a PART TIME administrative assistant. Very flexible hours and occasional weekends may be needed. Experience with RealComp is a HUGE plus. Administrative experience and Real Estate experience REQUIRED. Should be proficient in basic computer operations such as Microsoft Word and Excel (or Open Office) and Web Browsers, and be great on the phone.

Please email your resume.

We look forward to speaking with you!
Employers, when searching for an employee to fill a position, STOP saying a particular skill set is a "HUGE plus" or "Preferred." Stating something's a plus or preferred implies that it's not necessary and you can teach it to them, but very nice to have.

Yet, you have the nerve to get upset when you can't find someone with that particular skill set amongst applicants, or folks apply without that particular skill set because YOU don't know how to fill positions.

If, without question or exception, you want someone with a particular skill set, state clearly in the ad that it's REQUIRED, not a "HUGE plus" or "Preferred.". You'll save yourself time/money and you'll save the applicant time/money.

Last edited by 313Weather; 08-06-2012 at 01:55 PM..
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Old 08-06-2012, 01:26 PM
 
Location: USA
7,478 posts, read 5,787,167 times
Reputation: 12321
Agreed. Some companies are really bad with this. They'll post some narrow job listing and give the requirements as something like:

Required:
A mechanical engineering degree and a pulse.

Preferred:
3 to 5 years experience designing interior trim for blue sedans
Experience programming Siemens Model XYZ robots
TQM, 6-Sigma, and Kaizen methods
Experience with (insert company quality management system here)
CAD (Catia Version 5 preferred)
FEA analysis
Experience in the automotive industry.

I mean, we get it, and you're not fooling anyone by sticking the actual job requirements under "Preferred" vs. "Required." I don't know if they get something out of having lots of people apply based on the low Requirements while having no shot at the job, or if it is a way to justify hiring the boss's son because he meets the "Requirements" even though everything they really want is only "Preferred."

Last edited by Rambler123; 08-06-2012 at 01:47 PM..
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Old 08-06-2012, 01:43 PM
 
Location: Virginia Beach, VA
5,517 posts, read 9,012,668 times
Reputation: 2542
Quote:
Originally Posted by 313Weather View Post
Employers, when searching for an employee to fill a position, STOP saying a particular skill set is a "HUGE plus" or "Preferred." Stating something's a plus or preferred implies that it's not necessary and you can teach it to them, but very nice to have.

Yet, you have the nerve to get upset when you can't find someone with that particular skll set amongst applicants, or folks apply without that particular skill set because YOU don't know how to fill positions.

If, without question or exception, you want someone with a particular skill set, state clearly in the ad that it's REQUIRED, not a "HUGE plus" or "Preferred.". You'll save yourself time/money and you'll save the applicant time/money.

All for $8 an hour. Im sure.
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Old 08-06-2012, 01:45 PM
 
7,238 posts, read 10,891,939 times
Reputation: 5583
Quote:
Originally Posted by Randomdude View Post
All for $8 an hour. Im sure.
Worse.

The ad I used to state my point in the OP said the wage was negotiable.
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Old 08-06-2012, 01:47 PM
 
Location: NYC
2,803 posts, read 3,039,941 times
Reputation: 4789
Hiring is not an exact science and employers don't really know what they need anyway. They think if they list a bunch of requirements, it increases their chances of finding someone good. But it's very likely they'll get someone who looks good on paper but has a host of problems. It's also just as likely that someone without these skills is super smart, a fast learner and everything else you'd want in an employee. If you are confident in your abilities, just apply. The last three offers I have gotten, I probably fulfilled less than half of the listed requirements. I usually interview very well. The only ones where I bomb are those where they ask specific questions about a specific tool they are using. But guess what, if you're not interested in training anyone and only want people with knowledge of that obscure software you use in your shop, you're going to miss out on a lot of great hires and it will be your loss.
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Old 08-06-2012, 01:49 PM
 
Location: Central, IL
3,408 posts, read 3,578,046 times
Reputation: 1371
Quote:
Originally Posted by 313Weather View Post
Employers, when searching for an employee to fill a position, STOP saying a particular skill set is a "HUGE plus" or "Preferred." Stating something's a plus or preferred implies that it's not necessary and you can teach it to them, but very nice to have.

Yet, you have the nerve to get upset when you can't find someone with that particular skll set amongst applicants, or folks apply without that particular skill set because YOU don't know how to fill positions.

If, without question or exception, you want someone with a particular skill set, state clearly in the ad that it's REQUIRED, not a "HUGE plus" or "Preferred.". You'll save yourself time/money and you'll save the applicant time/money.
And you assume that it is not what they claim why? because they didnt give you the job?
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Old 08-06-2012, 01:55 PM
 
9,778 posts, read 16,971,140 times
Reputation: 18394
We use the terms required and preferred because that is what we mean. Some things are "required" while other things are "preferred." They are not synonymous terms.
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Old 08-06-2012, 02:00 PM
 
7,238 posts, read 10,891,939 times
Reputation: 5583
For the record, I'm referring to employers who, although they REALLY want to hire someone with a particular skill set without exception, instead of stating that it's required in the ad they continue to re-post job ads stating it's "preferred" or a "HUGE plus", then whine when they're getting applications from people without that particular skill set.
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Old 08-06-2012, 02:01 PM
 
Location: North Fulton
1,039 posts, read 2,040,215 times
Reputation: 600
Some companies are required to post a job externally even if they already have an internal candidate in mind. One of the frustrating parts is, as an outsider, you really do not know how often this happens or not.
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Old 08-06-2012, 02:02 PM
 
15,530 posts, read 13,519,456 times
Reputation: 21236
They do this to add flexibility to the hiring process, and to insulate themselves from things like EEO suits.

If they would put the preferred items under required, and they hired a guy that had all but one of those requirements, the company will leave the door open to EEO suits as the company did not "follow policy", thus the gov will determine that none of the requirements are really required. So if there was a hiring complaint, or an audit, the company has now exposed themselves to an EEO finding.
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