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Old 08-22-2012, 04:59 PM
 
7,238 posts, read 10,900,774 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lifeexplorer View Post
Fine. You can make all the points you want
I already did.
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Old 08-22-2012, 05:20 PM
 
5,191 posts, read 4,893,797 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hnsq View Post
Suppose you were hiring for a job where you want the employee to be very self-motivated. You have it down to two equally qualified candidates. Both are roughly the same age, have the same skillsets, are willing to (and capable of) working the same hours, etc. One of the candidates has motivated himself enough to train for, and compete in a marathon in his free time, while the other candidate fills his/her free time watching TV. Which candidate would you choose?
Honestly, I would prefer to hire the person who spends his/her free time watching TV. I have 2 reasons for that preference. Firstly, I would worry that someone who is training for a marathon is going to put his/her marathon training above their job. The person who watches TV is unlikely to put his/her TV watching above his/her job. Whatever shows they miss while working overtime, they can just tape it (on a VCR or DVR or whatever they want to use) or watch it online somewhere. The marathon runner probably won't be willing to make an exception to his/her training in order to work overtime. I know they both claim that they are willing to work the same hours. But, honestly, everyone says that they are willing to work as many hours as needed. My perception is that the person who watches TV would be more willing to work those hours than the marathon runner.

Secondly, my experience is that people who are training for something like a marathon tend to have very rigid personalities, which is not desireable in a workplace. I find that they tend to be difficult to work with, and refuse to make any exceptions to their exercise routine or to their diet, even though most jobs require you to be flexibile with things like that.

I admit that I am basing my opinion (preferring the TV watcher) on my own biases. And you are basing your opinion (preferring the marathon runner) on your own biases.
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Old 08-22-2012, 05:32 PM
 
Location: The City That Never Sleeps
2,043 posts, read 4,863,689 times
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So all those marathon runners, amateur tap dancers, actors, parachuters, etc. need to keep their "other" life or hobbies secret. ..if that's possible. Nice. Thanks for the tip. I've always known that.
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Old 08-22-2012, 06:34 PM
 
306 posts, read 345,957 times
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I think this is a very important factor. It makes the interviewer want to hire you for another reason besides your qualifications. I like to think of getting the interviewer to like you as almost creating a referral for yourself in the company. It's making somebody in the company want to put you in that position. I tend to find that part of interviewing to be the easiest.
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Old 08-23-2012, 05:03 AM
 
26,590 posts, read 54,613,838 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mitsguy2001 View Post
Honestly, I would prefer to hire the person who spends his/her free time watching TV. I have 2 reasons for that preference. Firstly, I would worry that someone who is training for a marathon is going to put his/her marathon training above their job. The person who watches TV is unlikely to put his/her TV watching above his/her job. Whatever shows they miss while working overtime, they can just tape it (on a VCR or DVR or whatever they want to use) or watch it online somewhere. The marathon runner probably won't be willing to make an exception to his/her training in order to work overtime. I know they both claim that they are willing to work the same hours. But, honestly, everyone says that they are willing to work as many hours as needed. My perception is that the person who watches TV would be more willing to work those hours than the marathon runner.

Secondly, my experience is that people who are training for something like a marathon tend to have very rigid personalities, which is not desireable in a workplace. I find that they tend to be difficult to work with, and refuse to make any exceptions to their exercise routine or to their diet, even though most jobs require you to be flexibile with things like that.

I admit that I am basing my opinion (preferring the TV watcher) on my own biases. And you are basing your opinion (preferring the marathon runner) on your own biases.
My husband ran a dozen or so marathons and still runs six miles a day. It doesn't and never did interfere with his job. And his diet? Ugh. I wish I could get him to eat healthier. The only reason he isn't overweight is because he runs.

FYI--Running releases endorphins. Most runners are very happy, positive people. Most runners do it for fun and personal achievements, they aren't in it for the money and don't train like an Olympian. I think you are really mistaken in your thoughts on this matter.
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Old 08-23-2012, 10:07 AM
 
5,191 posts, read 4,893,797 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by annerk View Post
My husband ran a dozen or so marathons and still runs six miles a day. It doesn't and never did interfere with his job. And his diet? Ugh. I wish I could get him to eat healthier. The only reason he isn't overweight is because he runs.

FYI--Running releases endorphins. Most runners are very happy, positive people. Most runners do it for fun and personal achievements, they aren't in it for the money and don't train like an Olympian. I think you are really mistaken in your thoughts on this matter.
And that is exactly why it is a bad idea to refuse to hire certain employees for reasons unrelated to the job. In this case, I would have potentially lost out on an excellent employee who runs marathons, because of my personal biases. And, HNSQ will lose out on excellent employees who aren't athletic enough for his tastes, and don't get their cars professionally detailed often enough.

I know HNSQ is going to come back with his typical "life isn't fair" response. But he needs to realize that he is the one who is losing out on good employees for silly reasons.
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Old 08-23-2012, 10:11 AM
 
7,238 posts, read 10,900,774 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mitsguy2001 View Post
I know HNSQ is going to come back with his typical "life isn't fair" response.
Yes, he and a few others are almost too predictable with their responses.
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Old 08-23-2012, 10:19 AM
 
5,191 posts, read 4,893,797 times
Reputation: 3314
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mystique13 View Post
So all those marathon runners, amateur tap dancers, actors, parachuters, etc. need to keep their "other" life or hobbies secret. ..if that's possible. Nice. Thanks for the tip. I've always known that.
The issue is that any hobby that is irrelevant to the job can be seen as either good or bad, depending on the biases of the interviewer, but you have no way of knowing what the interviewer's biases are.

For example, I enjoy eating at ethnic restaurants. Some interviewers may interpret that to mean that I have an interest in other cultures, which they will likely see as a potitive. Other interviewers may interpret that to mean that I'm a fat, lazy person who thinks only about eating, and likes large quantities of unhealthy food to be prepared and served to me by others. So, is that something I should say if I'm ever asked about hobbies in an interview? Nobody can answer that question for sure, since there is really no way to know what the interviewer's bias is.

I think that rather than refusing to hire employees who have a hobby that you find undesireable, or who don't have a particular hobby that you do find desireable, it is best to talk it with the potential employee about your expectations for the job and how you feel that the hobby (or lack of) may affect that person's job. A few examples of potential conversations are:

"I see that you are training to run a marathon. Keep in mind that this job will require extensive overtime, which could interfere with your training schedule. We need you to put your job above your training. Also, we usually work during dinner hours and order fast food. And you sometimes have to take clients out to lunch at restaurants. You may not be able to rigidly maintain your diet if you are working here. Are you ok with that?"

"I see that you like to go skiing. Keep in mind that this job will require overtime on winter weekends at a moment's notice, and you may have to cancel your ski plans at the last minute. We cannot reimburse you for any non-refundable travel fees. Are you ok with that?"

"I see that you are not a skiier. Most employees here are skiiers, and we have an annual ski retreat, which is a major team-building event. Are you willing to give skiing a try at that event?"

"Based on your address, it appears that you live in a condo complex which has a pool. Keep in mind that this job will require overtime on summer weekends. You may not get to use your pool much, if at all. Are you ok with that?"

"I see that your car is a little messy. Keep in mind that this job will require you to drive clients around, using your personal car. We expect you to get it professionally detailed every other week, at your own expense. Are you willing and able to do that?"

Does this make sense?
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Old 08-23-2012, 10:26 AM
 
26,590 posts, read 54,613,838 times
Reputation: 13019
Quote:
Originally Posted by mitsguy2001 View Post
And that is exactly why it is a bad idea to refuse to hire certain employees for reasons unrelated to the job. In this case, I would have potentially lost out on an excellent employee who runs marathons, because of my personal biases. And, HNSQ will lose out on excellent employees who aren't athletic enough for his tastes, and don't get their cars professionally detailed often enough.

I know HNSQ is going to come back with his typical "life isn't fair" response. But he needs to realize that he is the one who is losing out on good employees for silly reasons.
I don't think anyone is asking for a car to be professionally detailed. I think it's more a matter of having it not look like a rats nest. There's absolutely no excuse to have three month old empty fast food cartons on the floor of the car, in my opinion that's a sign of a mental illness like hoarding. I looked in my car before I got in it today. There's a hoodie and two of those cloth grocery bags in the back seat, an umbrella on the floor of the back seat. On the floor of the front passenger side is a tennis ball and an empty plastic water bottle that my son left behind. That wouldn't make me say "no way" to a potential hire. That's normal "stuff."

I'm talking about a car that looks like this:



That is not normal, it is not healthy, it is gross, and I wouldn't hire someone who drove a car that looked like that. It's not mentally right in the head.
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Old 08-23-2012, 11:40 AM
 
18,935 posts, read 9,646,556 times
Reputation: 5303
Some people just have this talent to twist whatever other people say beyond imagination. Almost feel like whenever I say something, I need to attach a 300 pages legal document to qualify my statement.
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