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Old 08-19-2012, 12:21 PM
 
708 posts, read 776,020 times
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Responding to the OP, likeability seems to be a big factor in hiring now. In my short time of job hunting, I have noticed that peer evaluation has become more common in the interview process. I don't know if its evolving from something highly valued by the younger generation, a result of working long hours with no interaction with anyone, but the person at the desk next to you, or just a result of trying to make choosing a candidate more rock solid. Whatever it is, it comes up a lot even in some job descriptions I've read.

No one wants to work with an angry bitter person, and sure, some office cultures may not work for certain personalities. It may come down to the type of position and how much interacting that person will do with others. In sales, yes, you need to be likeable. File clerk, maybe not so much. I do believe its important for a manager to be likable to some degree. Most everyone has had to work for someone where it would have been a lot easier to get tasks done or conflicts resolved if the manager was more approachable.

At the same time, I believe likeability is replacing respect as a value. I'd rather work with someone who knows what they are doing because I have found that when people know what they are doing an atmosphere of respect is fostered. I knew who to call to get certain questions answered because they knew what they were doing. I respected their knowledge and work ethic. I liked working with that person for that reason and didn't mind going out to lunch with them. We were about getting the job done. I'm not trolling work to look for a drinking buddy although I am not opposed to making friends at work (over a long period of time though).

Its not bulletproof anyway. For example, you could have a good personality and then I find out that we have different views on something that I hold very dear to me. While remaining pleasant to you, I may not be so inclined to be buddy-buddy with you and may even think a little different of you after that. It happens regularly, so to me likeability shouldn't be given the hiring ranking that it gets (save for a position involving with dealing with the public and so forth).

I will say, I can see it being used as a decision maker between hiring two equally qualified candidates. I would choose the person whom I liked the best all else being equal.
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Old 08-19-2012, 12:22 PM
 
629 posts, read 1,099,383 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thebunny View Post
Hold on a second...in one sentence you say it is unprofessional (I bolded that) to pick someone because of a feeling. I also bolded where you say that as long as the person doesn't bring in negative vibes, it is ok...so please explain what a "vibe" is if not a feeling....
No problem. By negative vibes I mean someone who will bring down the morale of other workers which will affect the company. By "feeling" I mean judging someone based on absolutely nothing that relates to the work environment (ie. He won't fit in, the girls will hate him, she's too ugly and will distract the others). Some are exaggerated but you get the idea.
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Old 08-19-2012, 12:22 PM
 
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Likeabilty is not tangible, except when they try to define it, some of you call that voodoo science.

Case to point. When you at an interview and you start to bad mouth your previous company, what do you think your interviewer is thinking? Certainly not "I feel so sorry about this candidate and he is so right about his previous employer!" Your interviewer is really thinking:"OMG, this guy doesn't know me from Adam and he is already telling all these negative stuff. Imagine what he would say if he works here for a little while. "
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Old 08-19-2012, 12:24 PM
 
18,796 posts, read 9,612,025 times
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Originally Posted by Kagami46 View Post
This sounds like a contradiction. The bolded part does not require likability to be accomplished. Plenty of people meet this criteria and aren't considered likable. Likability and social skills are two different things.
No contradiction there. Every employer would like the person I described.
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Old 08-19-2012, 12:25 PM
 
Location: California
4,402 posts, read 11,601,056 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kagami46 View Post
No problem. By negative vibes I mean someone who will bring down the morale of other workers which will affect the company. By "feeling" I mean judging someone based on absolutely nothing that relates to the work environment (ie. He won't fit in, the girls will hate him, she's too ugly and will distract the others). Some are exaggerated but you get the idea.
Looks is not a factor.

The person not fitting in to the culture absolutely is. Cultural fit matters more than people think, or want to give credit. But it is there, it matters, and it is taken into consideration when a hiring decision is made.
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Old 08-19-2012, 12:31 PM
 
629 posts, read 1,099,383 times
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Originally Posted by lifeexplorer View Post
No contradiction there. Every employer would like the person I described.
Bold statement based on what? I'm sure that some would but EVERY employer? How can you tell whether or not they can perform the tasks you provided based on the interview unless you asked them directly what they would do in those situations. Can you honestly say during an inteview that this person will never discuss disagreements in private? That he will never clarify his work with his boss? Never keep his boss informed? You can't unless they tell you themselves or show you at the work place. Again some exceptions to this.

Last edited by Kagami46; 08-19-2012 at 12:39 PM..
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Old 08-19-2012, 12:36 PM
 
629 posts, read 1,099,383 times
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Originally Posted by thebunny View Post
Looks is not a factor.

The person not fitting in to the culture absolutely is. Cultural fit matters more than people think, or want to give credit. But it is there, it matters, and it is taken into consideration when a hiring decision is made.
Oh looks are sometimes used as factor. Think of some retail environments with the most attractive staff you've ever seen. You're telling me it was a coincidence that only the most attractive people are qualified for this position? Who determines who fits in? Based on what? Describe "cultural fit" to me.
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Old 08-19-2012, 12:43 PM
 
Location: California
4,402 posts, read 11,601,056 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kagami46 View Post
Oh looks are sometimes used as factor. Think of some retail environments with the most attractive staff you've ever seen. You're telling me it was a coincidence that only the most attractive people are qualified for this position? Who determines who fits in? Based on what? Describe "cultural fit" to me.
The looks thing, yes it is used. But those companies (I can think of 2 main ones) get sued all the time over it.

As for cultural fit...well, in some offices the whole team goes out for drinks, they play sports on the weekends, the office is into a trip to Vegas, etc as ways of bonding with the rest of the team. If this is not something the new hire likes so he chooses not to attend, this can create a distance with the employees. Is this work related? No. But the new person has to fit into the established culture, NOT be one who does not. A When in Rome idea, so to speak.

In an office full of people who work late almost every night, the person who has to pick his kid up from daycare by 5:30 is going to be seen as a slacker who is not putting in his share.

The retail manager who all of a sudden gets an out of work commitment that makes him unable to work every Sunday but now expects the other managers to work additional Sundays to cover his. The culture is that you work Sundays. If you don't then you are going to be the outsider who does not fit in.

And all of these instances set the employee apart, make him appear not a team player, etc.
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Old 08-19-2012, 12:44 PM
 
2,114 posts, read 3,859,503 times
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Originally Posted by Three Wolves In Snow View Post
Really!

So you would rather hire someone who doesn't have a clue about how to do the job as long as they are, "likeable"?

.
So there are only two choices?
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Old 08-19-2012, 12:45 PM
 
18,796 posts, read 9,612,025 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kagami46 View Post
Oh looks are sometimes used as factor. Think of some retail environments with the most attractive staff you've ever seen. You're telling me it was a coincidence that only the most attractive people are qualified for this position? Who determines who fits in? Based on what? Describe "cultural fit" to me.
Looks have a lot to do with it. Statistically good looking people get jobs and better jobs easily and they are also paid better. That is just a fact of life. However looks ad very different for guys and girls. Generally speaking if you aren't growing two noses, most guys' looks are average - the non-physical stuff like behavior and how you dress have more to do with guys' look. For girls, you are good looking if you aren't fat.

I can dive into this more if anybody is interested.
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