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Old 08-19-2012, 12:49 PM
 
101 posts, read 276,807 times
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In my "off the record" conversation with the HR Person who was my point of contact during the long recruitment and interviewing process, she spoke to me honestly to help me out. I appreciated it and understand that this type of cander is uncommon and would normally get her in trouble.

I don't think she was saying I was a mean or angry person or had a terrible personality but instead, she said I just didn't connect with the managers and employees chosen to be in the large interview panel. I didn't seem like the type of person who they would interact with successfully to solve complex business problems with no right or wrong answers, or to enjoy chatting with at the water cooler. It was a personality mismatch. Maybe like the difference between the guys in the fraternity who end up in sales, and the nerds who prefer sitting at the computer terminal all day programming. They just don't connect or relate. They don't dislike each other but instead are just too different to work together effectively.

Being an Office Manager I KNOW much of my success will be based on my soft skills and personality and how I can connect with my customers. Those of you who think success in an office is based strictly on hard work and keeping your head down and sticking to the business at hand have not worked in the companies I have in my career. Business is based on relationships. But I admit, it is painful when a large group of fellow professionals can ignore my technical skills and career success and throw it out the window and not hire me because they did not feel a personal connection.
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Old 08-19-2012, 12:54 PM
 
629 posts, read 1,099,534 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thebunny View Post
The looks thing, yes it is used. But those companies (I can think of 2 main ones) get sued all the time over it.

As for cultural fit...well, in some offices the whole team goes out for drinks, they play sports on the weekends, the office is into a trip to Vegas, etc as ways of bonding with the rest of the team. If this is not something the new hire likes so he chooses not to attend, this can create a distance with the employees. Is this work related? No. But the new person has to fit into the established culture, NOT be one who does not. A When in Rome idea, so to speak.
Not everyone cares about these trips. Does that mean they will ruin it for everyone else? Maybe they are an introvert and don't like going out. Does that mean they're not qualified workers?

Quote:
In an office full of people who work late almost every night, the person who has to pick his kid up from daycare by 5:30 is going to be seen as a slacker who is not putting in his share.
If the work hours are set and the person meets them before they leave then it shouldn't matter. If during the interview HR tells them that this job requires late nights then obviously the person cannot leave early if they already agreed they have to stay late to remain in this position.

Quote:
The retail manager who all of a sudden gets an out of work commitment that makes him unable to work every Sunday but now expects the other managers to work additional Sundays to cover his. The culture is that you work Sundays. If you don't then you are going to be the outsider who does not fit in.

And all of these instances set the employee apart, make him appear not a team player, etc.
So because the manager wants to inconvenience others on a regular basis and the employee is not willing to put up with it, they are not considered a good candidate? I think HR should tell them if they work here they are prone to getting screwed. Then there wouldn't be an issue when the person chooses to leeave.
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Old 08-19-2012, 01:01 PM
 
2,114 posts, read 3,860,191 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marie5v View Post
When you have to share space with someone and be near them 8 or 9 hours a day, likeability is almost everything. Especially with general office work, which almost anyone can do with proper training (not like, say, computer programmer or rocket scientist). Every time I've totally hated a job, it's been because I didn't like the people I worked with. The people you work with can make every day fun or every day miserable. Who in their right mind would choose to spend three quarters of their life with someone who only wants to "get the job done" and isn't interested in being at all social or making the day more pleasant on a human basis? That's about as fun as working with a machine, but machines don't offend you or insult you. Likeability is important. If you can't be likeable than you'd better get a skill set that not many people have so you won't have to compete so much - admin work won't cut it.
As a computer programmer (database, formerly software), you are mistaken. The ability to get along is just as important in this field as any other. There are projects that are done as a group. One naysayer can drag the whole thing on forever. One know it all who always has to have it their way will cause chaos. Other times you have to find out how a process works. If the person who developed it is a pain in the butt, it makes the learning experience a nightmare. In a field plagued by loners, I see this all the time. It doesn't matter how great a computer superstar they are: if someone can't get along with others, they are less valuable then their qualifications.

I would much rather take someone lacking the technical qualifications but is willing to learning over the unlikeable person any day. Teaching someone to program is easier than trying to change their personality.
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Old 08-19-2012, 02:11 PM
 
629 posts, read 1,099,534 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnnytang24 View Post
As a computer programmer (database, formerly software), you are mistaken. The ability to get along is just as important in this field as any other. There are projects that are done as a group. One naysayer can drag the whole thing on forever. One know it all who always has to have it their way will cause chaos. Other times you have to find out how a process works. If the person who developed it is a pain in the butt, it makes the learning experience a nightmare. In a field plagued by loners, I see this all the time. It doesn't matter how great a computer superstar they are: if someone can't get along with others, they are less valuable then their qualifications.

I would much rather take someone lacking the technical qualifications but is willing to learning over the unlikeable person any day. Teaching someone to program is easier than trying to change their personality.
See what you're describing are issues with social skills. Not the same as being "likable". If the people you worked with were able to maintain a work relationship with good communication then whether or not they were likable would be irrelevant. You're describing those who prefer to work alone and so lack the social skills necessary to work as a team. I've worked in a team with people I dislike greatly and we've accomplished great things.
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Old 08-19-2012, 02:24 PM
 
373 posts, read 560,961 times
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Likability is everything in a job search. I have been unemployed for one week and have had two interviews for a job I would need to be sent to school to learn. The only reason they are thinking about hiring me is because I am very personable and like able. I am still friends with former coworkers I worked with as a teenager.

Be that person everyone likes!
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Old 08-19-2012, 02:38 PM
 
2,114 posts, read 3,860,191 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kagami46 View Post
See what you're describing are issues with social skills. Not the same as being "likable". If the people you worked with were able to maintain a work relationship with good communication then whether or not they were likable would be irrelevant. You're describing those who prefer to work alone and so lack the social skills necessary to work as a team. I've worked in a team with people I dislike greatly and we've accomplished great things.
'Likeable' is an ambiguous term that can easily include social skills.
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Old 08-19-2012, 02:41 PM
 
629 posts, read 1,099,534 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Liberty12 View Post
Likability is everything in a job search. I have been unemployed for one week and have had two interviews for a job I would need to be sent to school to learn. The only reason they are thinking about hiring me is because I am very personable and like able. I am still friends with former coworkers I worked with as a teenager.

Be that person everyone likes!

Ugghhh. You're proof that most people have to either learn to be likable or learn to wear the mask. Not everyone wants to change and that's understandable, especially if they'r still a productive member of the company. Unfortunately for some, people would rather be around someone they like rather than someone who is efficient. Sure some have both qualities and are an obvious choice but what about the rest who have been unemployed for months without any interviews while you charm your way into your next job yet again. Life's a lesson. We all need to practice that smile in the mirror and learn to look like we care about everything our coworkers say even if it isn't work related.
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Old 08-19-2012, 02:43 PM
 
629 posts, read 1,099,534 times
Reputation: 454
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnnytang24 View Post
'Likeable' is an ambiguous term that can easily include social skills.
It can. But that hasn't been established on this thread yet. Are we referring to likeable as social skills then? If so then yes. Social skills are definately needed in any work environment.
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Old 08-19-2012, 02:46 PM
 
Location: On The Road Full Time RVing
2,342 posts, read 2,908,289 times
Reputation: 2224
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jobless and Broke View Post
OK, I finally got a Human Resources person to tell me why I was not hired into a job that I put so much effort into the application process. I put together lots of supplemental information; tried to create a link between the job description and my background and studied lots of interview books.

So here is the reason they said I was not hired: Likability. They did not like me.

Is this a good reason? I was hired to work not put on a coffee party, right?

I was interviewed for an Office Manager job.
Yes it is and they do not have to have a reason ...
your just not it according to them ! ! !
.
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Old 08-19-2012, 03:38 PM
 
653 posts, read 1,549,850 times
Reputation: 441
Quote:
Originally Posted by marie5v View Post
Every time I've totally hated a job, it's been because I didn't like the people I worked with. The people you work with can make every day fun or every day miserable. Who in their right mind would choose to spend three quarters of their life with someone who only wants to "get the job done" and isn't interested in being at all social or making the day more pleasant on a human basis?
Coming from a 'people person', this is extraordinarily lacking in empathy for those who are not as skilled with 'playing the game'. Not everyone is as good as you at this, but you are surprisingly callous to that fact.
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