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Old 08-24-2012, 11:12 PM
 
Location: Metro Detroit, Michigan
12,679 posts, read 14,049,093 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJBest View Post
Only good advice if a better school isn't an option.
Exactly. One of the most important aspect of a job is the ability of the candidate to show up on time, everyday, and fulfill the duties of the job. Online classes do nothing to affirm the candidate is capable of such. The question is... If the student graduates, will they obtain the same degree as the students who physically attended all the classes? Obviously, transcripts will shed light on this prior to hiring.

Just with talking to various employers, they do not view online classes as an acceptable substitute for physical classes on the grounds of what I just mentioned. Aside from that, old school employers seem a bit weary of new concepts such as online classes. Many don't trust that potential cheating is properly controlled. Aside from that, it should never be acceptable to show up to class in PJs. Part of going to college is learning how to assimilate and behave in a proper, formal, semi business like environment.
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Old 08-24-2012, 11:25 PM
 
Location: California
4,402 posts, read 11,637,590 times
Reputation: 3129
I think online school shows a person is willing to work hard, to juggle work, family, and school. So I would be just as interested in both. You are lucky that you have the 2 years that you can take off.

And, to clear up misconceptions. Online schools have deadlines, the students are often expected to be in class lectures, online. Etc. And deadlines throughout the week. I finished the last portion of my degree (2 classes) online.

Also, transcripts from an online school do not differentiate, as there is no difference. They are just as accredited as the brick and mortar ones, and as such, there is no differentiation in the transcripts. My official transcripts show the classes taken for the MBA, and the transcripts show no difference between the 13 brick and mortar and the 2 online. in fact, I am the only one who knows, and that is because I know the classes I finished online.

Other than living in CA and going to a school in New York, which I did not do, LOL...the only was a person would ever figure out the school was online is to compare where you lived and went to school.

Oh and it is the exact same degree.

Any other misconceptions about going to online school?
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Old 08-25-2012, 10:01 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
33,957 posts, read 42,271,549 times
Reputation: 43420
It's clear to me that many of you don't know what being "accredited" actually means. And, contrary to what thebunny posted above, not all on-line schools are accredited, nor are all brick and mortar schools.

In this area the Middle States Association is the accrediting agency. It visits and analyzes schools and their educational programs every few years based on about a dozen different standards ranging from program to facilities. Essentially the school has to be doing what its saying its doing.

An area college which lost accreditation was the University of the District of Columbia, specifically the law school. One whose status is in jeopardy now is Penn State. Fallout from the Sandusky scandal which indicated lack of Administrative oversight and control.
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Old 08-25-2012, 11:10 AM
 
Location: The Chatterdome in La La Land, CaliFUNia
38,901 posts, read 20,203,525 times
Reputation: 35922
Quote:
Originally Posted by andywire View Post
Exactly. One of the most important aspect of a job is the ability of the candidate to show up on time, everyday, and fulfill the duties of the job. Online classes do nothing to affirm the candidate is capable of such. The question is... If the student graduates, will they obtain the same degree as the students who physically attended all the classes? Obviously, transcripts will shed light on this prior to hiring.

Just with talking to various employers, they do not view online classes as an acceptable substitute for physical classes on the grounds of what I just mentioned. Aside from that, old school employers seem a bit weary of new concepts such as online classes. Many don't trust that potential cheating is properly controlled. Aside from that, it should never be acceptable to show up to class in PJs. Part of going to college is learning how to assimilate and behave in a proper, formal, semi business like environment.
Many fully accredited colleges/universities don't distinguish between online and traditional classes on student transcripts. I've taken a few online classes through a state university and community college and no where on my transcripts does it state "online" or "distance learning" .....
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Old 08-25-2012, 12:20 PM
 
7,238 posts, read 10,919,968 times
Reputation: 5583
Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
It's clear to me that many of you don't know what being "accredited" actually means. And, contrary to what thebunny posted above, not all on-line schools are accredited, nor are all brick and mortar schools.

In this area the Middle States Association is the accrediting agency. It visits and analyzes schools and their educational programs every few years based on about a dozen different standards ranging from program to facilities. Essentially the school has to be doing what its saying its doing.

An area college which lost accreditation was the University of the District of Columbia, specifically the law school. One whose status is in jeopardy now is Penn State. Fallout from the Sandusky scandal which indicated lack of Administrative oversight and control.
There are several different types of accreditations.

There's a national accreditation, which ITT Tech has. National accreditation means the school is for-profit and only offers vocational/technical educations.

Then also, there's the regional accreditation. The Higher Learning Commission is the main association that regionally accredits schools through several sub-association.

While both national and regional accreditation are recognized by the DOE, most employers measures how good a school by whether or not they're accredited regionally. They don't want to see a bachelor's degree from a school that's for-profit and focused on vocational training versus a bachelor's degree from a non-profit school that offers a well-rounded academic education. The employers really just want to know that you received a good education. Also, you can only transfer credits you earn at regionally accredited institutions to other regionally accredited institution (because they feel National Accredited institutions have lower learning standards).

Regional Accreditation Associations have very strict standards a school must abide by to maintain it. is what the school you're referring to lost.

Then also (what you're likely referring to), there's accreditation for individual departments/schools inside a university. For the business departments/schools, there's the Association to Advance Collegiate School of Business (AACSB). There's likely an association that accredits individual law departments/schools as well, which could be the accreditation the school you discussed in your post lost
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Old 08-25-2012, 12:36 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
33,957 posts, read 42,271,549 times
Reputation: 43420
Yeah, but the main thing is, whatever legitimate entity does it, is that the institution is accredited. And knowing which schools have credibility and which don't. Full Sail comes to mind (but it's near the ocean).
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Old 08-25-2012, 01:29 PM
 
Location: St Thomas, US Virgin Islands
24,671 posts, read 58,577,979 times
Reputation: 26532
Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
Yeah, but the main thing is, whatever legitimate entity does it, is that the institution is accredited. And knowing which schools have credibility and which don't. Full Sail comes to mind (but it's near the ocean).
My take on this is as I posted earlier on in this thread - that an applicant who has attained a "degree" and the accompanying piece of worthless paper (certificate) from a diploma mill might think twice before applying when they read this caveat. Of course there are accredited institutions which offer legitimate on-line course studies. The diploma mills are completely different and for a price and no study at all will provide you with a framed certificate to hang on your wall with price depending on which degree you want and with a sliding scale accordingly from a simple BA to a PhD. One of our local senators was outed on exactly this sort of scam a few years back when her two diploma mill degrees (which she had often touted while campaigning and, when elected, proudly displayed in her office) resulted in her being quite the laughing stock ... she paid something like $5K for these "credentials".
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Old 08-25-2012, 03:24 PM
 
130 posts, read 274,569 times
Reputation: 181
Quote:
Originally Posted by andywire View Post
Exactly. One of the most important aspect of a job is the ability of the candidate to show up on time, everyday, and fulfill the duties of the job. Online classes do nothing to affirm the candidate is capable of such. The question is... If the student graduates, will they obtain the same degree as the students who physically attended all the classes? Obviously, transcripts will shed light on this prior to hiring.

Just with talking to various employers, they do not view online classes as an acceptable substitute for physical classes on the grounds of what I just mentioned. Aside from that, old school employers seem a bit weary of new concepts such as online classes. Many don't trust that potential cheating is properly controlled. Aside from that, it should never be acceptable to show up to class in PJs. Part of going to college is learning how to assimilate and behave in a proper, formal, semi business like environment.
Do people that have a desire to learn and do better for themselves need 4 years of attendance at a brick and mortar school to learn how to behave professionally in an office and showup on time? If that is the case, most of the population are idiots.
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Old 08-25-2012, 03:36 PM
 
Location: Metro Detroit, Michigan
12,679 posts, read 14,049,093 times
Reputation: 13508
Quote:
Originally Posted by Loops778 View Post
Do people that have a desire to learn and do better for themselves need 4 years of attendance at a brick and mortar school to learn how to behave professionally in an office and showup on time? If that is the case, most of the population are idiots.
No, but it would be nice if the employer knows they are capable of such BEFORE they hire them. A college degree used to reassure a potential employer of this. And you would be surprised how many are not capable of such a simple, yet important obligation.
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Old 08-25-2012, 05:12 PM
 
7,238 posts, read 10,919,968 times
Reputation: 5583
Quote:
Originally Posted by Loops778 View Post
Do people that have a desire to learn and do better for themselves need 4 years of attendance at a brick and mortar school to learn how to behave professionally in an office and showup on time?
No.

On the other hand, it shouldn't take a four year degree to prove to an employer that you can answer a telephone, type a memo and file a form in the right folder.

It's all only exasperating the problems we have now between employers whining about a skills mismatch and employees whining about the lack of jobs.

I say what we do to balance things out is cut off all Graduate Degree student loans and subsidize a 4-year college education for everyone. That way, everyone will have a Bachelor's Degree and will be on a even playing field. It'll be so few people with a Graduate Degree that the employer wouldn't be able to demand workers have one as a job requirement.
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