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Old 06-09-2013, 08:49 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
69 posts, read 160,528 times
Reputation: 46

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Glad to hear that you landed an accounting position, its really tough out there am going through the same situation, still looking for a job, I have applied to hundreds ( lost count) very few interviews but it gives me hope when people who were struggling to find work are finally getting something.
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Old 06-09-2013, 08:56 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,592 posts, read 17,582,380 times
Reputation: 27677
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zenoctilles View Post
Instead of viewing the interview like a test, treat it like a date. You are trying to woo your interviewers into accepting you as a potential employee.

Ask yourself: How can I make myself the sort of person that employers want to hire? Every employer looks for something different - make sure you are ticking the right checkboxes as you interview. Make sure that you are speaking to the correct audience in terms of presenting yourself as someone they might want.

Knowing what they want is as easy as reading the job description or listening to them describing the role that they want to fill. Also, being friendly and not socially awkward helps.
I've always treated an interview like I'm a salesman. I'm trying to sell the customer (the interviewer) the product (my labor). I'm friendly, with a hearty handshake and a smile, but I don't try to be overbearing beyond that.

You're correct in that if you carefully study the job description and then tailor your interview knowledge to what the company asked for, you're much more likely to land the position. If you're speaking to a technical audience, don't speak in generalities. If you're speaking to generalists, don't talk in jargon. In such a competitive market, being able to match the company's needs to your skills and communicating that concisely and in plain language to an interviewer is more important than ever.

BTW, what is a "low salary" to you and where are you located?

Last edited by Serious Conversation; 06-09-2013 at 09:05 PM..
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Old 06-09-2013, 09:03 PM
 
25 posts, read 64,615 times
Reputation: 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Merchant_ZZZ View Post
Was this through an agency or was this direct? Also what city and do you have any suggestions?
Direct, which makes it even better.

I live in Boston. My suggestions are pretty plain: Keep at it. Look at where you failed and see how you can improve yourself in future interviews. Getting a job is ultimately a crapshoot these days.
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Old 06-09-2013, 11:22 PM
 
Location: Nescopeck, Penna. (birthplace)
12,351 posts, read 7,513,144 times
Reputation: 15950
Congrats! And the nature of the market is such that in ten years, the process/strategy will likely be much different, and your skills will likely be partially devalued. But if you've shown this much ambition so far, I suspect you'll have a few more things in the "tool kit" by then.
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Old 06-10-2013, 06:18 AM
 
7,422 posts, read 13,718,175 times
Reputation: 4944
to the OP - congrats!

it definitely takes a ton of time and effort to find a job these days. it took me almost 30 interviews (including phone screens) to get an offer, and i didn't take it. i don't even know how many applications i've sent in - i get daily e-mails from idealist and indeed, and check other job boards frequently, and i usually apply to at least a couple of jobs a day. for 6 months now. do the math. that's a lot of applications!

i think the key to effectively job searching is to be persistent and keep up with it, but also to realize that it's extremely hard to get a job these days in most fields. you have to strive to be the best you can be, and if something isn't working (you're not getting interviews, or you get interviews but no jobs), you need to work on improving the step that is failing. but if you take all the rejection personally you can get really crushed. it's a balance.

these are the most important things i've learned in my job search so far. i am extremely confident in my application materials because they have gotten me a boatload of interviews. not so confident in my interviewing skills because only 1 of those interviews has led to an offer (although there are a couple where i voluntarily withdrew myself).

- your resume should focus on accomplishments, not just job duties

- cover letters should not just be a rehash of your resume. they're your chance to talk about personal qualities you have that are work-related but don't belong on a resume.

- both resume and cover letter should be as clear and concise as possible. use bullet points in your resume, short sentences in you cover letter. don't go crazy with cool resume layouts, unless you're in the design field - the #1 concern is readability and most employers don't give a damn if your resume looks fancy.

- it's better to apply for jobs that seem like a really good fit for you and spend some time customizing your application materials rather than sending out a zillion generic applications.

- it is extremely important to have some questions ready to ask at an interview.

- related to the above, interview the interviewer. you don't just want to convince them to give you a job at any cost (even if you do, pretend you don't). you want a job that is a good fit for you, both in job duties and company/office culture. so ask about culture, management style, how your performance will be measured, what a typical day looks like, what qualities made people excel at the job in the past. this will make you look impressively confident and in-demand, and if you can afford to actually be choosy, you should. i mean think about it - if you bs in your interview and get a job you can't really do, or where you're miserable, and you end up fired, quitting, or just unhappy, is that really a good thing?

Last edited by groar; 06-10-2013 at 07:00 AM..
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Old 06-10-2013, 06:51 AM
Status: "Gaining Stability." (set 13 days ago)
 
5,684 posts, read 5,937,708 times
Reputation: 4432
Congrats! Good luck to you.
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Old 06-10-2013, 09:34 AM
 
25 posts, read 64,615 times
Reputation: 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Emigrations View Post
I've always treated an interview like I'm a salesman. I'm trying to sell the customer (the interviewer) the product (my labor). I'm friendly, with a hearty handshake and a smile, but I don't try to be overbearing beyond that.

You're correct in that if you carefully study the job description and then tailor your interview knowledge to what the company asked for, you're much more likely to land the position. If you're speaking to a technical audience, don't speak in generalities. If you're speaking to generalists, don't talk in jargon. In such a competitive market, being able to match the company's needs to your skills and communicating that concisely and in plain language to an interviewer is more important than ever.

BTW, what is a "low salary" to you and where are you located?
The job offered $35K per annum. I'll still be working my retail job part-time, at least, for the time being. I live in Boston.
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Old 06-10-2013, 02:36 PM
 
Location: Buckeye, AZ
27,341 posts, read 15,790,881 times
Reputation: 9876
I think it sounds about normal and I am glad to hear that you have a job.
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Old 06-10-2013, 04:39 PM
 
241 posts, read 514,115 times
Reputation: 251
GOOD FOR YOU!!!! Congratulations!

I have a lot of years of experience hiring people and everything that you say rings true . . . people do not put time and energy into presenting themselves well, and thus they don't get jobs. When they self-assess and do put in the effort, they will find something.

I really admire that rather than whine and complain you took stock of what you were doing and improved your presentation. That speaks really well to how you will do at your job. :-)
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Old 06-11-2013, 07:05 AM
 
Location: right here
4,131 posts, read 4,779,740 times
Reputation: 4868
Congrats!!!
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