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Old 06-15-2013, 05:01 AM
 
1,544 posts, read 2,070,018 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mkpunk View Post
The issue is millennials (a bulk of the college graduates) were told by their elders that they declare any major and they would get a good paying job. I am tired of sounding like a broken record but when you are continually told a lie, you believe the lie and millennials were told this lie during school and from one account, this lie is still going on.
I believe, that at least for the parents, they are changing their position of "Major in anything and you will get a good job". Of course I base this only on personal anecdotes and hearsay from friends, but from what I have heard it is strongly encouraged by the parents to major in something "relevant".

Now as to whether students are still being fed the "major in anything... puppies and rainbows and world peace" thing in college and high school I have no idea if the trend has been bucked, I hope so and I honestly think so. My friend majored in Anthropology and the advisor was very upfront with him that finding a job with just a BA in Anthropology would be very difficult- there was no bs'ing about "Don't worry employers will love your critical thinking and writing ability etc..." , the advisor was frank and truthful.
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Old 06-24-2013, 08:53 PM
 
3 posts, read 2,097 times
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Wow this is a great thread that makes me feel a lot better. I'm recent college grad and haven't found a job yet in a month after school and I'm starting to get worried. While in school and after, I've had 10-12 interviews total and no luck with any (no 2nd rounds,etc.). I honestly think I have trouble conveying confidence at interviews as i'm pretty socially awkard and get extremely nervous for interviews. My gpa is a 3.0 (which is meh in accounting), had a leadership position in college, and had a year of solid internship experience in the accounting field. I really hope I don't get to 20 or 30 interviews without a job. Right now I could care less about where I get a job. As long as I start out in the $30-40k range, I'll be extremely happy. Any advice? I've been bombing my resume+cover letter on indeed and my local job site and have done a fine job getting interviews. I just can't close when I get to the interview process. I'm thinking about doing some mock interviews to find out what I'm doing wrong (bc I feel my answers are decent and I ask solid questions at interviews). Honestly I just believe I have trouble differentiating myself as I'm not a cpa, don't have more than 1 year of accounting experience, and don't have solid social skills that would make someone really wanna hire me.
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Old 06-24-2013, 10:09 PM
 
25 posts, read 64,641 times
Reputation: 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by jkpoker13 View Post
Wow this is a great thread that makes me feel a lot better. I'm recent college grad and haven't found a job yet in a month after school and I'm starting to get worried. While in school and after, I've had 10-12 interviews total and no luck with any (no 2nd rounds,etc.). I honestly think I have trouble conveying confidence at interviews as i'm pretty socially awkard and get extremely nervous for interviews. My gpa is a 3.0 (which is meh in accounting), had a leadership position in college, and had a year of solid internship experience in the accounting field. I really hope I don't get to 20 or 30 interviews without a job. Right now I could care less about where I get a job. As long as I start out in the $30-40k range, I'll be extremely happy. Any advice? I've been bombing my resume+cover letter on indeed and my local job site and have done a fine job getting interviews. I just can't close when I get to the interview process. I'm thinking about doing some mock interviews to find out what I'm doing wrong (bc I feel my answers are decent and I ask solid questions at interviews). Honestly I just believe I have trouble differentiating myself as I'm not a cpa, don't have more than 1 year of accounting experience, and don't have solid social skills that would make someone really wanna hire me.
Before you apply for the next job or go to your next interview, consider the following:

1. Have you changed your approach to interviews at all?
2. Are you a person that people want to hire? If not, change that. And quick.

Remember, it's the experience that gets you the interview. Once you are in, it's a matter of evaluating of whether you are a good "fit" for the place or not.

Anyways, I'm one week into my new job, and I am enjoying my work so far. I am still hoping to get enough academic credits (I've got 124 credit hours) and eventually take the CPA exam.
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Old 07-05-2013, 07:41 PM
 
496 posts, read 1,548,775 times
Reputation: 313
I graduated with a degree in Business Administration (human resources concentration) in 2010 and had 4 internships under my belt when I graduated (two of them being human resources whereas the other two were mainly administrative). Instead of working after college, I went to seminary for 3 years to get a M.A.(No regrets.Going to seminary did wonders for my personal development). While in school I worked as an administrative assistant for a little bit (also worked in custodial services for almost a year to earn extra cash). Now that I've graduated, I'm looking for a full time job in human resources. I've been really lucky to get interviews but no offers yet. So I'm definitely in that same boat. To say that the process is frustrating is a major understatement.
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Old 07-05-2013, 10:34 PM
 
3,552 posts, read 4,370,123 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Merchant_ZZZ View Post
Well it sounds like a delayed trend -- back in the 1950s-1960s it used to be all about getting a high school diploma. In the 1960s and 1970s, there were a raise of people receiving them -the time when the "elders" were growing up. Then time became that a college degree would need to be the standard requirement in order to be successful. Of course it is utter bull**** as I know a lot of people without degrees who are making well over $100k in their career.

I do not care about the whole entitlement trend. I can not see anyone starting out with a job which pays $70k without any experience. That would be ridiculous. However, if there is a job which pays let's say $9/hr in my chosen field or something which relates or transfers into it. I would take it because I know it would open doors for me in the future.
I made 70k my 2nd year out of tech school, 110k the next year, and over 80k so far this year.

Im 25 and luckily for me no one in my generation seems to want to do any actual labor work outside of an air cooled office. Granted I'm in an office now but worked my way up to it over a couple years.

Too much of my generation is beyond self entitled. Works for me, I'll continue doing well in the jobs everyone is "too good for." Or its "below" them.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I317 using Tapatalk 2
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Old 07-08-2013, 02:52 PM
 
159 posts, read 292,596 times
Reputation: 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by ForkInTheRoad View Post
Whenever it's been brought up during an interview I've had no issue explaining myself (and each time I've been met with positivism and understanding on the situations for the short term jobs.)

The real question is how can I implement those explanations into my resume without looking unprofessional? It seems rather out-of-the-norm for a resume to say "resigned due to relocation for family emergency" and the like next to each job. Would they really care?
Do not include any explanations on your resume-- positive or negative. The interview is your opportunity to clarify your resume, should they need you to do so.

On an online application, if they absolutely require an explanation, simply put relocation. But I try as much as possible to avoid the long online resume.
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