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Old 06-25-2013, 07:44 AM
 
1,246 posts, read 2,989,228 times
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The last time I updated my resume, was several years ago when I was looking for a new job (in fact I was offered the job but chose not to take it, so hopefully my resume was good to start with). However, now it seems to me that the chronological resume approach probably won't work so well. I have a lot of skills relevant to the job I want to apply for, but my unique problem is that I have had very few "official" job changes. I've worked 15+ years in the same division at the same company, but while my job duties are constantly changing (with experience constantly being gained), and for revolving bosses, I've never really "officially" switched positions, and new responsibilities don't come with new job titles. So it looks like I've been doing the "same thing" for 15 years, but I really haven't.

I've heard it recommended that it's OK to emphasize skills/achievements instead of actual chronological positions/titles, but I don't know what that sort of resume looks like. What should I do?
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Old 06-25-2013, 01:08 PM
 
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that kind of resume is called a functional resume, and you can look up examples online if you like. but i don't think it's a good idea. a lot of hiring managers look at them as hiding something, and that's because they often are. you don't have anything to hide, don't do it.

what you can do is talk about your achievements at your current job. you can work "increasing levels of responsibility" somewhere into the description, and talk about your advancement within the role. you can also emphasize this in your cover letter. since you won't have many (or maybe any?) other jobs on your resume, you can make the bullet point list of duties and achievements on your resume pretty long for this position.

there is no shame in working at the same place for 15 years, and there are ways of demonstrating advancement within the same role beyond hiding your job history. people generally use functional resumes to cover long periods of unemployment and/or job hopping and many hiring managers are going to suspect that that's what you're doing if you use one.
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Old 06-26-2013, 07:11 AM
 
Location: Ayrsley
4,714 posts, read 8,480,078 times
Reputation: 3814
Quote:
Originally Posted by groar View Post
that kind of resume is called a functional resume, and you can look up examples online if you like. but i don't think it's a good idea. a lot of hiring managers look at them as hiding something, and that's because they often are. you don't have anything to hide, don't do it.

what you can do is talk about your achievements at your current job. you can work "increasing levels of responsibility" somewhere into the description, and talk about your advancement within the role. you can also emphasize this in your cover letter. since you won't have many (or maybe any?) other jobs on your resume, you can make the bullet point list of duties and achievements on your resume pretty long for this position.

there is no shame in working at the same place for 15 years, and there are ways of demonstrating advancement within the same role beyond hiding your job history. people generally use functional resumes to cover long periods of unemployment and/or job hopping and many hiring managers are going to suspect that that's what you're doing if you use one.
Great advice. The fact that you (the OP) has been with the same place for 15 years is actually a big plus. Many people job-hop with frequency these days so that will actually stand out. As groar said, emphasize the responsibilities you have had and the experiences you have gained, even though you may not have had a lot of title changes.
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Old 06-26-2013, 03:42 PM
 
1,246 posts, read 2,989,228 times
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Thanks for the advice. My current resume lists education first, my employment history next, and then a big section of "experience" with bullet points and I identify in parentheses the position where I used the skills or did the achievements or whatever. I did this because I wanted to make my general areas of experience stand out, and make it easier for the resume reviewer to see that I have relevant experience. Wondering if I should change that arrangement or let it be.

Another question: My post-college employment history is long (23 years) and some of my earlier jobs just aren't relevant to the position I'm applying for. Really the only one that is, is the "jobs-within-a-job" (the position I've been in for 15 years) where my roles and duties changed periodically but my title did not change dramatically. Should I leave off my earliest jobs and just focus on the last 15 years if they're more relevant?

Also, is it ever OK to just list your degree without giving the year? The first thing they're going to see is that I graduated from college... quite some time ago... I guess I'm just wondering if re-ordering my sections would be wise, where I don't put my college degree first.

Last edited by Jeromeville; 06-26-2013 at 03:50 PM..
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