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Old 07-01-2013, 09:14 PM
FBJ FBJ started this thread
 
Location: Tall Building down by the river
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lisan23 View Post
I worked as a staffing manager. We reviewed every single application and if we had an opening that you were qualified for we called you.

Almost every company where I live requires you to complete an online application. I don't understand why you dislike them so much. When I did hiring it made my life so much easier.

Well the first turn off about online applications is requesting the SSN

 
Old 07-01-2013, 09:24 PM
 
Location: Corona the I.E.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WestPhillyDude75 View Post
Well the first turn off about online applications is requesting the SSN
That has only happened to me once in about 300 applications so it's pretty rare.
 
Old 07-01-2013, 09:55 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WestPhillyDude75 View Post
Well the first turn off about online applications is requesting the SSN
Most online applications do not ask for your ssn or birthdate. Neither are needed at that point.
 
Old 07-02-2013, 05:31 AM
 
7,422 posts, read 13,734,536 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WestPhillyDude75 View Post
Well the first turn off about online applications is requesting the SSN
neither of these applications requested my SSN. i think that's a terrible thing to do in an initial application, but in my experience it's also not the norm.

and to answer earlier questions, i have also gotten tons of interviews (more than half of the 30+ that i've had in the last 7 months) from online applications, so i don't think it's just random. and no, i am not looking in areas with particularly low unemployment. my current search was in several areas with fairly high unemployment. pittsburgh (where i live and work now) does have slightly lower than average unemployment but there's still lots of competition. over 100 people applied for the job i have now.

and what about the people who don't get calls back? well, i don't get calls back from the majority of the places where i apply either. i know that the odds are stacked against people, but your application is NOT just going into a black hole. SOMEONE gets called back and someone gets hired for these jobs, it just might not be you. with good application materials and persistence, you CAN get results. i also don't have a college degree, i started out temping and eventually got a permanent AA job and now i have 8 years' very varied AA/project management experience to put on my resume. i also did a volunteer project on my own (organizing a major community project that involved writing a grant) that is now on my resume and was a big factor in getting my new job.

i think what gives me an advantage is:

1. i look religiously every day and apply to everything i'm qualified for that seems like a fit.
2. i have worked very hard and gotten lots of critiques to make my resume as good as i can get it.
3. i customize my cover letter (which i've also worked very hard on) every time, and my resume if necessary. if an application only allows for uploading a resume, i put my cover letter in the same document.
4. i read ads carefully and make sure i address everything in them and follow instructions.

things i haven't done:

1. i haven't given any thought to what keywords appear in my resume.
2. i don't call or e-mail drop by to follow up on an application. the only time i get in touch beyond returning calls/emails is if they've told me they'll get back to me by x date and it's at least a few days past that date.
3. i haven't lied or failed to mention that i wasn't local. i haven't lied about anything (well not in my application materials - there's always a bit of lying in interviews, like not mentioning the issues you had with old bosses etc).
4. i haven't faxed anything or timed my e-mail applications to put them at the top of someone's inbox (haha what's up wpd!)

i do have the luxury of already having a job and not having a strict timeline for finding a new one, so i can be choosy and only go for jobs that i have genuine enthusiasm for and feel like i'm a good fit for. that certainly helps. but you can fake that if need be.

my new job had an online app but it's also a very small organization. the first woman who interviewed me specifically mentioned that the personal connection to the organization's mission that i mentioned in my cover letter was something that made me stand out.

Last edited by groar; 07-02-2013 at 05:55 AM..
 
Old 07-02-2013, 05:42 AM
 
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by the way, parried, i know your situation is very different from mine and i don't want to make you feel bad, but the job i just got is in the state you live in. in a region (western mass) that has high unemployment relative to the rest of the state.

it's not as easy as some people on this forum say it is to get a job "if you just work at it" or whatever (it took me 7-8 months for chrissakes!), but it's not totally random and it's not impossible.

speaking of which, if you want me to take a look at your resume and cover letter, dm me. i'd be happy to help.
 
Old 07-02-2013, 08:47 AM
 
1,923 posts, read 2,074,405 times
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What kind of jobs though? I don't have any college degree and I've seen jobs that only require high school diploma and ged but it's all a wash.
 
Old 07-02-2013, 08:59 AM
 
7,422 posts, read 13,734,536 times
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well, i don't have a degree but i have a lot of experience with computers and clerical stuff etc. so the jobs i'm applying to are less entry level than what you're probably looking at. the job i ended up getting is an office manager position with room for advancement into a more specialized role in a small nonprofit. 8 years of work experience got me to the point where i can get a job that a lot of places would give to a new grad or someone with a degree and just a couple of years of experience. but oh well.

what worked for me was temping. there are temp agencies that deal with all sorts of work. you can end up in a permatemp situation where they just keep you on through the agency forever, which sucks. but if you do a good job it can be a way to show employers that you can do the work rather than just telling them you can in a traditional application process. and you're not volunteering or "interning" for free, which i think is b.s. when it's a for-profit company.

so yeah, when i was in my early 20s and had no real work experience, i signed up with a temp agency, took some computer skills tests, and started working. i actually had a permanent job offer from one assignment, but i had other priorities at the time. then i moved and did some retail and data entry work for a bit, then i started temping again and my second assignment kept me for the contract period and then hired me. that was a tiny organization and i did seriously EVERYTHING, and it made for a great resume item that has carried me through the rest of my career so far. and as i mentioned, i also did things i cared about on my own that are impressive enough for my resume.

i know you're looking for very basic work - have you tried signing up with manpower or labor ready or another temp agency that deals with blue collar or retail jobs? at least it's something to put on your resume, you'll have some money coming in, and you might make a connection that leads to something better.
 
Old 07-02-2013, 09:49 AM
FBJ FBJ started this thread
 
Location: Tall Building down by the river
39,615 posts, read 50,394,120 times
Reputation: 9451
Quote:
Originally Posted by groar View Post
well, i don't have a degree but i have a lot of experience with computers and clerical stuff etc. so the jobs i'm applying to are less entry level than what you're probably looking at. the job i ended up getting is an office manager position with room for advancement into a more specialized role in a small nonprofit. 8 years of work experience got me to the point where i can get a job that a lot of places would give to a new grad or someone with a degree and just a couple of years of experience. but oh well.

what worked for me was temping. there are temp agencies that deal with all sorts of work. you can end up in a permatemp situation where they just keep you on through the agency forever, which sucks. but if you do a good job it can be a way to show employers that you can do the work rather than just telling them you can in a traditional application process. and you're not volunteering or "interning" for free, which i think is b.s. when it's a for-profit company.

so yeah, when i was in my early 20s and had no real work experience, i signed up with a temp agency, took some computer skills tests, and started working. i actually had a permanent job offer from one assignment, but i had other priorities at the time. then i moved and did some retail and data entry work for a bit, then i started temping again and my second assignment kept me for the contract period and then hired me. that was a tiny organization and i did seriously EVERYTHING, and it made for a great resume item that has carried me through the rest of my career so far. and as i mentioned, i also did things i cared about on my own that are impressive enough for my resume.

i know you're looking for very basic work - have you tried signing up with manpower or labor ready or another temp agency that deals with blue collar or retail jobs? at least it's something to put on your resume, you'll have some money coming in, and you might make a connection that leads to something better.

I amazed you were able to just pick up and move to a new city for employment since you have to possibly break leases
 
Old 07-02-2013, 09:54 AM
 
1,102 posts, read 1,573,787 times
Reputation: 1136
^ Many people do that all the time. The small financial price you pay in the short term can be well worth the rewards you get with career advancement. In some cases, employers offer relo compensation.
 
Old 07-02-2013, 09:58 AM
 
7,422 posts, read 13,734,536 times
Reputation: 4944
Quote:
Originally Posted by WestPhillyDude75 View Post
I amazed you were able to just pick up and move to a new city for employment since you have to possibly break leases
i own my house. i'm not recommending that parried move, and i'm not moving for employment. i'm moving because i want to move, and looking for a job because i need a job when i get there. that's also why i moved last time, and i lived with roommates and didn't have a lease at that point. i just had to find someone to take my room, and that was really just a courtesy.

in any case, people break leases for various reasons all the time. sometimes you can work something out with your landlord, sometimes you have to pay. if it's worth it to you, you deal with it.

i'd say what a weird thing to say, but i guess it's not weird for you to say weird things.
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