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Old 07-03-2013, 05:32 PM
 
Location: SNA=>PDX 2013
2,660 posts, read 3,051,472 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by convextech View Post
Recruiters usually hire from WITHIN a company. Headhunters hire OUTSIDE candidates FOR a company.
Ah, good to know. So I guess they are recruiters. How much of HR are they? No clue. Like I said, some just do the recruiting, but not the hiring. Others I've seen walk you through the entire process.


Quote:
Originally Posted by convextech View Post
This has been a great thread! I consider myself a seasoned business traveler but I've learned quite a few things here. Thanks!
So very true! Thank you everyone!!!
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Old 07-03-2013, 06:12 PM
 
Location: Western Washington
8,947 posts, read 8,406,922 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by psichick View Post
Ah, good to know. So I guess they are recruiters. How much of HR are they? No clue. Like I said, some just do the recruiting, but not the hiring. !
Some large organizations will have an HR specialist dedicated to recruitment. Their duties typically include posting openings, screening applications to meet minimum qualifications, scheduling interviews, dealing with travel and managing the paperwork process involved in tendering an offer. Sometimes they will also do onboarding and benefits, but that can be a handoff point.

They will typically be an intermediary with salary negotiations, but the real decision making authority on that would be a hiring manager with budgetary discretion.
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Old 07-03-2013, 06:30 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
10,001 posts, read 16,668,282 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by convextech View Post
Recruiters usually hire from WITHIN a company. Headhunters hire OUTSIDE candidates FOR a company.
Not true in Portland. HR folks whose primary task is employment are called Recruiters. A Recruiter can also be a contractor. A Headhunter is a person a company engages to FIND candidates, usually high level or special skills.

Now, my suggestion about negotiating salary: It appears that this employer has a fixed range for this job (or broad-banding with sub groups) or there are peers who are paid below what you are asking. The wizards of compensation control this and get all bound up if folks are hired well above midpoint (salary compression and all that). What you want to do is feel out is whether or not there is any possibility of re-classifying this position to a higher range in the future.

Last edited by Nell Plotts; 07-03-2013 at 06:41 PM..
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Old 07-03-2013, 06:56 PM
 
Location: Western Washington
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nell Plotts View Post
What you want to do is feel out is whether or not there is any possibility of re-classifying this position to a higher range in the future.
Don't go there. This gives the impression that you are an empire builder, or that you have the opinion that the company is poorly run. Otherwise why would you think a job should be reclassified?

Ask about advancement potential. Indicate that you feel you could take on additional responsibilities beyond their description. But don't imply that they need to change things to make you happy.
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Old 07-03-2013, 09:08 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
10,001 posts, read 16,668,282 times
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I don't believe that inquiring about potential reclassification implies that the company is poorly run at all. Compensation gets those questions all the time. Believe you me, the position of Compensation Manager is a political hot seat. If an influential manager wants his/her administrant reclassified to a higher level s/he will make it happen. Keep in mind that job classification is a blend of skills, market and politics. There are some organizations where adjustments take a corporate 'act of congress', while in others adjust a paragraph here and there and there you are. The OP won't be the only player in that game so keep in mind that HR and the hiring manager won't want to cause a resurrection.

Fringe benefits are not negotiable, BTW, although it MIGHT be possible that the company will pick up some of your moving expense. There are ways to broach that in the course of salary negotiation.

I have no idea who you are interviewing with but if it is Kaiser, Metropolitan Insurance, a bank or the like they won't have a lot of salary maneuvering room unless you are working for a director level executive. If not at that level considering accepting the most that they are willing to pay, do a great job, then move up.

Good luck..
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Old 07-04-2013, 02:06 AM
 
Location: SNA=>PDX 2013
2,660 posts, read 3,051,472 times
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On the upside, in my situation, maybe because we discussed pay in that first interview, the HR rep started discussing opportunities within the company and with their parent company. She let me know that there was room for growth, moving around, etc. I think most HR people realize people want to move up to bigger and better things (usually). I was at my last job for 9 years. I only wish there was room to move anywhere.
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Old 07-04-2013, 08:19 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
10,001 posts, read 16,668,282 times
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There is the solution. The message I hear is that there is little that can be done about the pay that can be offered. Usually it takes an OK from Compensation Manager to offer pay over 75% of the range at hire but no harm in trying.

Don't discuss your desire to move up with the hiring manager. S/he has probably needed this opening filled for months and wouldn't want to do it again soon. Large employers often require an employee to stay in place at least 6 months, 12 months is more common. Heck, it will take you that long to master the job and start networking for your next opportunity.
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Old 07-05-2013, 05:25 AM
 
Location: SNA=>PDX 2013
2,660 posts, read 3,051,472 times
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An add-on question.

I received an email from the company with an expense form for my in-person interview costs (food, hotel, etc). One line item says "taxi/parking". Since I'm renting a car to run personal errands and to get to the interview, do you think it'd be fair to expense half the car rental? Or should I figure out how much a taxi would have cost, etc and expense just that part?
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Old 07-05-2013, 07:25 AM
 
7,422 posts, read 13,715,230 times
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is there someone you could ask that question at the company? i think the answer is really a matter of company policy, there's no set etiquette there. it's worth asking because they may tell you you can expense the whole car rental, who knows! just say "i was planning on renting a car; how should i handle that?" or something like that. what you do with it is not really an issue, it costs the same either way as long as you're not getting reimbursed for gas/mileage.
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Old 07-05-2013, 10:10 AM
 
Location: SNA=>PDX 2013
2,660 posts, read 3,051,472 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by groar View Post
is there someone you could ask that question at the company? i think the answer is really a matter of company policy, there's no set etiquette there. it's worth asking because they may tell you you can expense the whole car rental, who knows! just say "i was planning on renting a car; how should i handle that?" or something like that. what you do with it is not really an issue, it costs the same either way as long as you're not getting reimbursed for gas/mileage.
I'll have to see what the email says. If I'm to contact the relocation service or the HR assistant. But I'll do that. Thanks.
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