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Old 07-25-2013, 08:00 AM
 
Location: Holland
824 posts, read 1,061,816 times
Reputation: 1341

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How about creating a website on one of those free sites and showing some of your work there?
And of course, in your Linkedin profile, refer to that page.
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Old 05-15-2017, 10:44 AM
 
19 posts, read 12,723 times
Reputation: 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by AStalkingButler View Post
Right, but the problem I'm trying to address in this thread is that you have Math and Physics majors told that,

"Yeah, those are great degrees. You can do a lot with them. Did you know that most quants on Wall Street hold a Physics degree?"

Stuff like that. I think it's kind of deceptive because then you have a lot of Math and Physics majors who think they can easily become an actuary, quant, programmer, whatever. Truth is that it's very competitive to secure those jobs and you'll often need advanced degrees in addition to demonstrable technical skills.
I'm in the same exact position, and I remember hearing the same advice, except for me I did math not physics. I went back school for a CS master's program recently and I've completed all the prerequisites for it (data structures, operating systems etc). I've been applying to jobs for 6 months now, ~200 in total, and the furthest I've gotten was 1 phone interview, and 3 "skills" tests. I felt I did well on two of the skills tests, and I know I did horribly on one of them, but I didn't make it past that stage of the interview process, so who knows, maybe I did bad on all 3. I didn't get any scores back, just a rejection email.

Almost half of the jobs I've applied to were internships, but my 1 phone interview and those tests I've mentioned were from entry level jobs I had applied to. I'd take an unpaid internship, or a low paying job, I'd just like for it to be in programming so I could learn what I need to learn to make get my career going. I'm in one of the biggest metros in the country, and I've applied all over, and so far very little luck.

I thought I'd bump this dead thread rather than making a new one since this came up in a google search for me. I went into STEM since I was under the impression that people would be looking for me, rather than what I've read about people with softer degrees struggling, but I'm now finding out that the struggle is the same, if not worse. What I just mentioned was very appealing to me since I'm not really a people person, and I'm not good at selling myself, I'm very shy and so on, but that hasn't even really been an issue since I'm not even getting to the point of getting an in person interview. Then there's also the issue that I sort of switched into this, and I feel like I'm competing with people who have life long passions, and while I enjoy programming, it's still pretty new to me, but again, I'm not getting far enough in the interview process for this to matter. For now I'm going through codingbat refreshing myself in the event I would get an interview, but based on how it's gone so far, I'm less and less hopeful.
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Old 05-15-2017, 07:49 PM
 
928 posts, read 507,496 times
Reputation: 1305
Welcome to the US economy where thousands of good jobs have been outsourced over the past few decades and immigrants take what few good jobs are left. Keep trying, you have the right goal if nothing else.
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Old 05-18-2017, 01:40 PM
 
Location: New York
744 posts, read 461,146 times
Reputation: 1945
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTRdad View Post
Ok give up.
all the aspiring 'IT' guys whining on this board should give up. Youre not going to get anywhere in IT without processing information, recognizing patterns, or recognizing where *you* screwed up.
Yeah, pretty much. I directly switched from law to IT. No Physics undergrad, no prior programming experience. It took about 6-8 months to teach myself basic Java, which involved about the same time commitment as what I had to put into passing the bar exam (6-8 hours of study per day). At the time, basic knowledge resources were available online, at the library, from other programmers, etc.

The great thing is that today there's such a wealth of pre-packaged knowledge available (Coursera, edX, udemy, Codecademy, StackOverflow, HackerRank, Kaggle, etc) that your options for learning and contributing to the developer community is basically unmatched.

The real, ugly truth however is that taking a single edX course or 'knowing basic programming' is not going to cut it. You're going to have to apply to jobs, attend interviews, fail these interviews and then learn from the failures. Over time you'll gain the confidence, the resume building skills and the underlying knowledge to succeed.

My first Jr. level programming job was *terrifying*. I felt like the biggest imposter compared to my peers who had CS degrees. But the fact is that I already had the foundation, I just needed to be humble, and learn a LOT on the job. Over time confidence increases.

OP - No pedigree or major will "guarantee" you a job, it typically must be earned, and usually involves a lot of failure and frustration along the way. Blaming a lack of job on outsourcing, career counselors, etc is a cop-out. The jobs are out there, but you have to figure out what's blocking you from getting them. This, incidentally, is a great prep for an actual programming job, which involves repeated attempts, and many frustrations as well.
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Old 05-26-2017, 08:52 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC
437 posts, read 334,402 times
Reputation: 418
Not directed specifically at you OP but we have way too many people graduating college (2x every year) chasing too few available entry level jobs. Some people need to go learn a trade...

Last edited by MDude25; 05-26-2017 at 09:06 PM..
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Old 05-29-2017, 10:21 AM
 
3 posts, read 1,191 times
Reputation: 10
I registered just to write this but I clearly stumbled across this thread way too late to be of help to the OP. This topic hits very close to home and I feel my experience could possibly help someone in a similar boat(I certainly wished I had someone back in 2013 to guide me).

I too graduated in 2013 with a bachelor's in physics and now I'm a software developer with 2 years of experience...let me share how this came to be. Coming out of undergrad I had two NSF REUs(Research Experience for Undergraduates at two much higher ranked and well known schools than my own) I also managed an AT&T store in my final year of school(very stressful). I didn't have stellar grades at all, but I did know how business works and knew when results were necessary and worked accordingly...this is important!

Upon graduation I did secure a few on campus interviews with well known companies through the career services department(I feel this is ALWAYS the best route to a great job out of school). I was always a finalist and flown out to company HQ's but could never land the actual position...as you can imagine this gets frustrating. I eventually ended up moving back to my hometown in South Florida(so not really a small town) but not exactly a tech haven either. Surprisingly my resume did garner lots of attention from local employers for good jobs(tech sales, actual engineering positions, analyst roles) I got the in person interviews, but I couldn't land those either! WTF?!

2013/2014 both fly by with me unemployed or working temp jobs(data entry, cell phone repair). I ended up working for a week at this sunglasses startup company packaging sunglasses and printing UPCs...mind numbing stuff. The owner quickly realizes I'm no moron and asks if I have coding/development experience I tell yes(gotta fake it til you make it) and although I didn't, I did take C & C++ in college and did well. The on site developer introduces me to SQL and asks if I have any knowledge/could I read the code on the screen. I didn't do well, but by the end of the week I impressed him enough for him to install the software on my laptop to work with practice data.

It was then I realized I was missing "hard" skills. I had the education, but I didn't really have a tangible skill. I spent every waking moment mastering SQL, Excel, even Access. I came across a grant for unemployed/underemployed residents that would provide training in in-demand careers and sure enough database and development was covered. I then enrolled in a vocational school that taught the Microsoft .NET stack(C#,VB.NET, ASP.NET, SQL) I studied day and night and eventually landed a Jr. Dev position.

I went from sporadic employment to 50K a year in a matter of months once I fully dedicated myself to the craft. I'm currently much higher now.

Bottom line: Your degree is not the issue! In fact it's pretty desirable and I've been granted interviews just based on the fact I had a hard STEM degree. I admit you may be behind a CS grad, but self study to fill in the gaps. You need skills...hard tangible skills. Employers don't train anymore and you WILL face technical interviews so know your stuff!

Next, get involved in the local dev community. Trust me these guys are out there! Not everyone at starbucks on their MacBook Pros are looking at cat videos and writing some pipe dream film script. I was always working at the local starbucks and so were some of the other guys - Pay attention to people's computers screens.

Finally, consider a bootcamp or some other type of vocational training. Find out ways you can pay for it. My vocational school even accepted payment plans. You won't know unless you ask...you'd be surprised how much help people are willing to lend once they find out you're serious.
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Old 06-06-2017, 01:52 PM
 
19 posts, read 12,723 times
Reputation: 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by vladlensky View Post
My first Jr. level programming job was *terrifying*. I felt like the biggest imposter compared to my peers who had CS degrees. But the fact is that I already had the foundation, I just needed to be humble, and learn a LOT on the job. Over time confidence increases.
How did you end up landing that job and how long ago was this?

Quote:
Originally Posted by silverct9a View Post
I went from sporadic employment to 50K a year in a matter of months once I fully dedicated myself to the craft. I'm currently much higher now.
I'm also curious how you ended up finally getting hired. Was it an entry level job posting? How long did it take you and how many applications did you have send out before you were finally hired?

Last edited by 815307; 06-06-2017 at 02:12 PM..
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Old 06-12-2017, 11:10 AM
 
3 posts, read 1,191 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by 815307 View Post



I'm also curious how you ended up finally getting hired. Was it an entry level job posting? How long did it take you and how many applications did you have send out before you were finally hired?


I honestly got the first job through a recruiter(most of them suck but I got lucky with this one). The position was about as "entry-level" as a Database Developer position could be. I agree that there aren't many entry level IT jobs and due to that fact, I was thoroughly tested with a technical interview on SQL and Excel primarily.


My second and current job I obtained from a job board at the vocational school I attended. Every week they sent out an email blast about openings throughout South Florida. This is why I strongly encourage job seekers to be "plugged in" with your local development community. I honestly believe that I got a better shot at this job due to my affiliation with a well known vocational school in the area.


Going it "alone" in your job search(i.e. blindly applying on Monster, CareerBuilder, Indeed) can lead to no where fast. When you're affiliated with a bootcamp, vocational school, well known state university(most preferred due to access of prestigious employers) your chances of landing something increase exponentially in my experience...It's like you've been "vetted" already...trust me employers LOVE it when you've already been vetted.


If none of this is an option for you due to money or whatever, your next best option is meetup.com. Go to every local tech meetup and event and demonstrate your skills, knowledge, and most importantly, your passion. Passion is very difficult to fake!
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Old 10-21-2018, 05:06 AM
 
1 posts, read 161 times
Reputation: 20
I gave up the job search. I sunk into depression when my unemployment ran out and got on disability. That was 10 years ago. I have skills (fixing computers, IT, no programming, no degree). I gave up because it was taking so long to get any interest from any employer yet i have solid pc skills. I plan to just stay on disability i guess for the rest of my life. I lost interest in wanting to work because if it is going to be so difficult to get a job then i say, **** it!" I don't want a service industry job or retail or hourly wage work. I'm too good for that s**t. I'm in my early 50's so i figure I'll just stay on disability until retirement.

I tried everything in the book to show my skills and it got me no where. I even tried suicide but i didn't die, obviously. God, i look forward to when my life is over. Then i don't have to worry about anything anymore. And yes I am on an anti-depressant and i see a psychiatrist. I've been seeing those since I was a kid. I gave up trying because society makes things too tough. Life should give people a break. Why can't i get a break? I think of the things i will never have like a family of my own, a spouse, financial security, complete happiness, a feeling that life was fair to me. I think the government (and Trump should like this) should set up suicide centers where people can go to just end it all, painlessly. Just go to sleep and never wake up again. I fantasize about that every f'in' day. The way i feel is a reflection of how society has treated me. I never got a fair chance. Yes, life should be fair. And no, no one told me life is fair or unfair. They didn't tell me s**t. Life also sucks c*ck.

Here's my advice to society if you don't want people sitting around all day watching tv while surfing the web and collecting a check: make high paying or at least medium paying jobs easier to get even if you don't have a degree AND even if your job history is spotty, reflecting some job hopping or gaps in employment. If anyone out there is a complainer about those on disability and say that they should all get jobs, well, get employers to offer quality jobs like tech jobs or executive positions to candidates who deserve a good paying job (i'm thinking 6 figures or more) to people who are smart but couldn't get an education due to their disability and you would see less people on disability.
Equal opportunity for everyone.

Last edited by persistence_of_vision; 10-21-2018 at 05:25 AM.. Reason: wanted to include other info that shows how much i am a failure in life
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Old 10-21-2018, 05:45 AM
 
509 posts, read 269,084 times
Reputation: 2308
Quote:
Originally Posted by persistence_of_vision View Post
I don't want a service industry job or retail or hourly wage work. I'm too good for that s**t. I'm in my early 50's so i figure I'll just stay on disability until retirement.
I'm not sure if you'll even see this, but one has gotta start somewhere. For me, it was a busboy job, then dishwasher, then... If you have the smarts and good people skills, eventually people will notice. Re-read silverct9a's post above.
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