U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment > Job Search
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-22-2013, 12:31 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
13,343 posts, read 17,418,107 times
Reputation: 19654

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado xxxxx View Post
1. I have ADD
2. I hate micro managers
3. Can I work from home

4. "Can I have a hug?"
5. "High five!"
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-22-2013, 02:43 PM
 
Location: Noblesville, IN
3,713 posts, read 4,094,407 times
Reputation: 6255
I'm working at relocating...I have no idea what my position goes for in the new market. I know I was severely underpaid at my previous employer but my current employer is fair for the job I'm doing. My problem is that I'm seeking a "full service" position at a new company, where I get to use all of my skills, so not only do I want more than what I'm being paid currently, but I think it's appropriate for the job itself.

How does one educate themselves on the range offered if:

1) The job title varies by company.
2) The job title often means something different i.e. tax analyst does not necessarily mean CPA so salaries that come up are often in line with someone with additional education
3) Dallas is much different than Seattle

Help? I admit, I'm a bit of a novice in this area of negotiation...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-22-2013, 03:22 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
13,343 posts, read 17,418,107 times
Reputation: 19654
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShellNic View Post
I'm working at relocating...I have no idea what my position goes for in the new market. I know I was severely underpaid at my previous employer but my current employer is fair for the job I'm doing. My problem is that I'm seeking a "full service" position at a new company, where I get to use all of my skills, so not only do I want more than what I'm being paid currently, but I think it's appropriate for the job itself.

How does one educate themselves on the range offered if:

1) The job title varies by company.
2) The job title often means something different i.e. tax analyst does not necessarily mean CPA so salaries that come up are often in line with someone with additional education
3) Dallas is much different than Seattle

Help? I admit, I'm a bit of a novice in this area of negotiation...

Look on glassdoor.com and salary.com (among others) and triangulate.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-22-2013, 04:02 PM
 
Location: Buckeye, AZ
27,347 posts, read 15,795,936 times
Reputation: 9878
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShellNic View Post
I'm working at relocating...I have no idea what my position goes for in the new market. I know I was severely underpaid at my previous employer but my current employer is fair for the job I'm doing. My problem is that I'm seeking a "full service" position at a new company, where I get to use all of my skills, so not only do I want more than what I'm being paid currently, but I think it's appropriate for the job itself.

How does one educate themselves on the range offered if:

1) The job title varies by company.
2) The job title often means something different i.e. tax analyst does not necessarily mean CPA so salaries that come up are often in line with someone with additional education
3) Dallas is much different than Seattle

Help? I admit, I'm a bit of a novice in this area of negotiation...
Try to ask on forums on here what the COL is in the area you are moving to and what wages in those positions are typically paying there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-23-2013, 08:56 AM
 
Location: Noblesville, IN
3,713 posts, read 4,094,407 times
Reputation: 6255
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaypee View Post
Look on glassdoor.com and salary.com (among others) and triangulate.
I have looked at both of those websites. The problem I'm running into is I can't get an exact job title for what I do...so what info is then offered are for people with CPAs and different financial background. I have a degree and have tons of experience but I'm not an accountant. My job does not require you to be an accountant but the "ranges" I get seem to be for those types. I'm still working on it though...thanks for the tip.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-23-2013, 09:01 AM
 
Location: Noblesville, IN
3,713 posts, read 4,094,407 times
Reputation: 6255
Quote:
Originally Posted by mkpunk View Post
Try to ask on forums on here what the COL is in the area you are moving to and what wages in those positions are typically paying there.
I know the ranges and cost of living in Dallas is lower than Seattle. I've been studying like a mad woman trying to get a fix on what I need to make (to live and some extra ) for the job I will be doing. When I pull up a salary on the previously mentioned websites, I come up with a salary that is TWICE what I'm making and that just seems off to me. Oh, trust me, if I've been that underpaid for that long, I'm more than thrilled to make that kind of dough...and I'm perfectly willing to work my tail off for it. But it does seem like I'm shooting for the moon...not used to doing that.

As others have pointed out though...throw it out there and let it stick. Don't say another word as the ball will be in their court. How often has someone put a figure out there that was high and they pulled the offer back? Or is it usually just a lower offer? You'd think at my age I'd have a better grasp on this, but I've always struggled with this aspect. But now, probably because of my age, I'm sick of cowering to the lower figure. I AM worth it and I know it...I'm dang good at my job...yikes, this part is hard for me!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-23-2013, 05:58 PM
 
Location: U.S.A., Earth
4,495 posts, read 2,884,522 times
Reputation: 4013
Quote:
Originally Posted by LexusNexus View Post
1. Don't ask how much the job pays and this is the only question you ask.
Huh? you're not asking, but asking a the same time?
Quote:
Originally Posted by LexusNexus View Post
2. I once overheard an interview (conducted in a cubicle next to my office) where the interviewer asked, "are you better than the next guy?" The quick response was, "yeah, absolutely!" - he wasn't hired. Better answer? "I can't speak for the next guy, but I can assure you that I will be the type of employee my experience shows I have always been: a very good engineer who works hard to meet deadlines and who strives to produce top quality work." - This was my answer to the same question and an offer was made to me that same night.
This seems to be a one of those cases to show some humility.

One time, I researched online, reasons why people didn't get job offers following interviews. Some "rejectees" managed to track down the reason... For one person, the VP of the company was in on the interview and felt the candidate was too good. He was afraid that if hired, the new hired would eventually replace him one day.

The only other one I can recall which isn't related but I'd like to mention anyways is for some reason, the interviewee got nervous on the 4th interview and it really showed. They rejected him, citing that reason, and that for whatever his next interview will be, "try to keep it cool"
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-23-2013, 07:49 PM
 
Location: Western Washington
8,998 posts, read 8,421,179 times
Reputation: 15608
Don't bother giving a range when negotiating salary. The low number you mention instantly becomes your starting negotiating point. Why would any employer bother to offer you more than that when you have already admitted that you will work for the low number?

Everybody knows that most people are flexible on salary, and if your number is even close to the employers expected range they will counter offer.

Determine what you want and what you think is reasonable for the position and throw that number out there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-24-2013, 08:10 AM
 
Location: Noblesville, IN
3,713 posts, read 4,094,407 times
Reputation: 6255
Quote:
Originally Posted by fishbrains View Post
Don't bother giving a range when negotiating salary. The low number you mention instantly becomes your starting negotiating point. Why would any employer bother to offer you more than that when you have already admitted that you will work for the low number?

Everybody knows that most people are flexible on salary, and if your number is even close to the employers expected range they will counter offer.

Determine what you want and what you think is reasonable for the position and throw that number out there.
I really think this is great advice. It's really true when you think this way...why on earth would they offer you higher when they know you'll accept a lower figure? I've been thinking about that number quite a bit, realizing that with more information, I may change it, but yes, throwing it out there and letting it fly seems best.

Question though: you say if your number is even close, they'll counteroffer...if it's not close, how do you salvage the conversation? I'd want to smooth it out but not sound desparate...you know, maintain the confidence without offending the employer...ideas?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-24-2013, 10:45 AM
 
Location: Corona the I.E.
10,077 posts, read 14,031,716 times
Reputation: 8925
Quote:
Originally Posted by fishbrains View Post
Don't bother giving a range when negotiating salary. The low number you mention instantly becomes your starting negotiating point. Why would any employer bother to offer you more than that when you have already admitted that you will work for the low number?

Everybody knows that most people are flexible on salary, and if your number is even close to the employers expected range they will counter offer.

Determine what you want and what you think is reasonable for the position and throw that number out there.
Good advice tried to rep you.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment > Job Search
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top