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Old 07-23-2013, 08:01 AM
 
Location: Funkotron, MA
1,203 posts, read 3,099,663 times
Reputation: 1798

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I've turned down a few:

- The work place appeared far too informal and disorganized. It would have been interesting work, but I think it would have been too frustrating.

- It was a startup. I had doubts from the start when I couldn't find any information about the company even though they said they had funding and major projects lined up. They even said that they already had a couple of other branches in a different state. Couldn't find any info on those either. I also got a very salesmany vibe from the two founders. The company never got off the ground and the founders moved on to their next little project/idea. If I had accepted, I would have quit my job, moved, and then immediately ended up jobless!

- The 3rd job was a good one. I was ready to accept it but I got a job offer in an area that I was looking to relocate to. I would have liked that job a lot more than my current, but relocating was just a higher priority.
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Old 07-23-2013, 11:13 AM
 
1,006 posts, read 1,868,586 times
Reputation: 1556
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tekkie View Post
That's why companies should list their salary ranges for the positions they offer so they don't waste their time or the applicant's time. But that makes too much sense for it to happen.

I have never been part of a hiring process where salary range is not discussed in the first call. usually the HR Generalists calls first, at least in large co's, and one of her responsibilities is always to make sure that you are both in the same range with regards to salary expectations.
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Old 07-23-2013, 11:14 AM
 
3,083 posts, read 4,656,793 times
Reputation: 3524
Quote:
Originally Posted by cocaseco View Post
I have never been part of a hiring process where salary range is not discussed in the first call. usually the HR Generalists calls first, at least in large co's, and one of her responsibilities is always to make sure that you are both in the same range with regards to salary expectations.
Interesting. It has been my experience that salary is never discussed until either the face-to-face interview or the actual job offer.

What line of work are you in that this happens all the time?
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Old 07-23-2013, 12:00 PM
 
Location: Seattle
1,508 posts, read 2,093,450 times
Reputation: 2643
I've turned down several.

- For a couple I had multiple offers, in which case, I always chose the more challenging, interesting work. In my case, pay was pretty equal so it wasn't much of a factor, but in one of those the location was a huge factor. Fortunately the company offering the more interesting work was also in the preferred location or it might have been more of a dilemma.

- In one case I had multiple interviews, but was just getting a very bad feel for the way things ran. It seemed very at odds with the type of personality I have and it's good to know what types of work environments you mesh well with. This place was very unstructured, ad hoc, disorganized and frantic. That sort of crap just irritates me because it takes heroics to get anything done, and wastes my time. At their size, with their revenue stream, product portfolio and backend - they should have been able to manage better than that, but instead they were actually proud of it.

- I should have turned down the offer previous to my current position, but it led to my current position, so I guess I can't complain? The interviewer asked me a ton of hard questions that were completely unrelated to the job, and were obviously not on my resume. I have no idea why I got the offer at all, and had very mixed feelings about it. On one hand it was a great opportunity to grow my skillset in a direction I'd been wanting to go, but on the other - WTF? Who asks someone a bunch of unrelated questions, accepts struggling answers, and then offers them a job doing something totally different? I should have seen that as more of a red flag than I did. I didn't last a year before that manager drove me straight up the wall (and out the door). However during that time, I did impress another manager there, who was quick to offer me a position on his team when it became public knowledge that I was leaving. That team has worked out great.
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Old 07-23-2013, 12:14 PM
 
2,429 posts, read 3,223,870 times
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In my case it would be a substantial raise -- for A LOT MORE WORK. But I already have a fairly sweet salary where I am -- I can do it blindfolded, no stress, no suits, no schmoozing with clients.

So I'm wondering if there's something wrong with me -- that even for 30-thousand dollars more a year, I'm not really interesting in stepping up and doing the amount of work needed for the potential job. I HATE dressing up. Now, I wear a T-shirt and jeans -- the new job I'd have to be in a suit, be an exec, and I'd feel like I have to be "ON" all the time -- meeting with clients, other higher ups, etc.

Where I am now I'm a well paid peon -- which is fine with me. I'm already making more than I need -- single, no kids, 100K a year (not that I wouldn't like to make more) -- but shouldn't I want more? Wouldn't most people jump at a 30,000 raise. I'm asking myself why I'm not willing to DO more to MAKE more -- why am I not jumping at it. Fear? Laziness? Both? Neither?
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Old 07-23-2013, 12:17 PM
YAZ
 
Location: Phoenix,AZ
7,075 posts, read 11,844,202 times
Reputation: 6298
Heh.

See my rants about bad interviews.....

Most hiring managers take it well when I turn down their offers but I've had a few doozies.....

Toured a machine shop a few years ago and it was so dark in there I seriously doubted my solar calculator would work. Thank you, sir....but no, thanks.

I swear.....I saw his fists clench.....


A long time ago I interviewed for an engineering position at a mid sized manufacturer in Ohio. Dressed to impress and get a job offer, I was on a plant tour when a clump of grease/oil/dirt fell from the rafters on my best suit.

I explained to the headhunter the next day that if they can't keep a clean shop, then they can't make a quality product.

Never heard from that guy again.
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Old 07-23-2013, 12:26 PM
 
1,102 posts, read 1,570,954 times
Reputation: 1136
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdflk View Post
In my case it would be a substantial raise -- for A LOT MORE WORK. But I already have a fairly sweet salary where I am -- I can do it blindfolded, no stress, no suits, no schmoozing with clients.

So I'm wondering if there's something wrong with me -- that even for 30-thousand dollars more a year, I'm not really interesting in stepping up and doing the amount of work needed for the potential job. I HATE dressing up. Now, I wear a T-shirt and jeans -- the new job I'd have to be in a suit, be an exec, and I'd feel like I have to be "ON" all the time -- meeting with clients, other higher ups, etc.

Where I am now I'm a well paid peon -- which is fine with me. I'm already making more than I need -- single, no kids, 100K a year (not that I wouldn't like to make more) -- but shouldn't I want more? Wouldn't most people jump at a 30,000 raise. I'm asking myself why I'm not willing to DO more to MAKE more -- why am I not jumping at it. Fear? Laziness? Both? Neither?
Well, it sounds like you're pretty satisfied with where you are right now. When you are given more responsibilities/challenges at work, are you up for it? To a lot of people, money isn't the main motivator in a career... they do it because they really enjoy it. To me, it seems like you're that type of person, and there surely is nothing wrong with that.
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Old 07-23-2013, 12:33 PM
 
Location: Chicago
3,068 posts, read 5,319,658 times
Reputation: 3544
It amazes me as to how many people said they turned jobs down after the interview due to pay. Don't you folks discuss pay PRIOR to interviewing in person? I would never agree to an interview without at least getting a range. Its a waste of my time and the hiring managers if our salary expectations don't align.

To the OP. Money isn't everything, if you are happy and are afraid of the work you may have to do, the dressing up, etc then just stay put. You seem happy and content. Try to obtain that kind of pay at your current employer.
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Old 07-23-2013, 01:17 PM
 
Location: Florida and New England
1,233 posts, read 1,417,433 times
Reputation: 1676
I've had multiple instances where it becomes obvious that the fit isn't good.

Like other posters, I want to know the pay range before committing a lot of time to the process. However, some employers will not divulge any pay information up front. Obviously as a candidate you try to defer to the employer, but every time this has happened (pay initially not disclosed), the pay has been ridiculously low. Like half of what I am currently making.

One job in Virginia was a wild experience: the pay was acceptable, and the people I interviewed with were fine, even friendly. But very late in the process, a completely new individual was introduced to the interviewing -- someone who had been "unavailable" earlier. Turns out this guy was going to be my direct line manager, and he was incredibly overbearing. Rude, crude, and lots of attitude.

Problem was, I had already indicated that the job was acceptable, negotiated a start date, etc. (Had not yet however given notice at current job). Fortunately, this rude guy gave me an out. He stated that he wanted to conduct an additional technical interview after the first "chat" we had. I used this opportunity to decline the job by refusing his second interview.

The recruiter totally lost his marbles, saying that I was legally bound to continue to this final interview and must accept the position following that. The recruiter and agency phoned for weeks afterward, and I thought they might litigate at some point, but I had the ultimate out -- we were still interviewing, after all.
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Old 07-23-2013, 01:22 PM
 
3,083 posts, read 4,656,793 times
Reputation: 3524
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChiGuy2.5 View Post
It amazes me as to how many people said they turned jobs down after the interview due to pay. Don't you folks discuss pay PRIOR to interviewing in person? I would never agree to an interview without at least getting a range. Its a waste of my time and the hiring managers if our salary expectations don't align.
From what I have heard in the past, it's always been frowned upon to discuss pay before they mention it or offer you the job. That's why I never asked before. But I think I'm going to start asking upon receiving a phone call to set up any type of formal interview. I'm over wasting my time on these interviews for jobs that I wouldn't take unless I absolutely needed it.

I just wish they would list the range in the job ad. That way, I don't waste my time applying for a job that I won't take and it doesn't clutter the inbox receiving them.
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