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Old 08-01-2013, 12:17 PM
 
19,009 posts, read 9,687,714 times
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I wrote a small blog on this very topic. Hope it helps you.

http://www.city-data.com/blogs/blog3...lly-about.html
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Old 08-01-2013, 12:35 PM
 
19,009 posts, read 9,687,714 times
Reputation: 5334
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mosela View Post
Ok. Well I was reading the book knock them dead.. and it says in there to do thank you emails and follow ups. That make you look like you are interested, and you get their attention and not get lost in the shuffle.
I usually also ask how many resumes they received and how many candidates they are interviewing. ... Some companies got like over 100 resumes.... so I guess I should be thankful I even land interviews.
I just don't know anymore. If my resume matches what they are looking for what am I doing wrong ?
I also wonder if its because I am a woman. I am just saying this... the last few times I went on interviews there were no woman in the group. ... and perhaps they would prefer a male over female.
I dunno - but something is just not going right
The usefulness of a thank you letter or email is very limited. If you and others are super close - I haven't seen that in all my career, then it may be of some use.

It's a great thing that you are having interviews as it means your resume looks great and there are a lot of opportunities for you.

It may come down to simple interview skills unless you flank the technical questions. Hiring companies typically want to see if you do any of the following:
1. Speak bad about your previous employer or supervisor.
2. Speak bad about anything.
3. Have many questions about work hours.
4. Not focus on the questions asked - digress a lot.
5. Talk too much.
6. Talk about any company politics.
7. Bring up too many irrelevant personal stuff like wife, kids, divorce, mental issues etc.

You may think it's hard but actually it's easy: just stick to what is relevant to the job and keep any personal discussion to the minimal.

A woman actually has a huge advantage over men particularly in IT as long as you are relatively fit, dress up properly and speak properly. The IT field is so short of women, almost every employer wants women to be in their team - yes, I am in IT too.
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Old 08-02-2013, 09:01 AM
 
400 posts, read 1,321,623 times
Reputation: 413
Look.... If you're getting call backs to applications its not your resume... If your passing the phone screen then its not you're phone skills... If you're interviewing it may not be your interviewing skills... When a person continuously makes it through the hiring process and doesn't get an offer he/ she may be BLACKBALLED. It happens... Hire an agency to find out what former employers/ colleagues are saying about you... Remove connections from your LINKED profile that you worked with but didn't necessarily like.... some may say competition is fierce which it is but in a case like yours I would call BLACKBALLING all day all night long
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Old 08-02-2013, 05:18 PM
 
Location: Boston
177 posts, read 475,332 times
Reputation: 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by lifeexplorer View Post
I wrote a small blog on this very topic. Hope it helps you.

http://www.city-data.com/blogs/blog3...lly-about.html
Thank you. I booked marked this - will read it over in a bit.
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Old 08-02-2013, 05:26 PM
 
Location: Boston
177 posts, read 475,332 times
Reputation: 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by groar View Post
i do think that the 2 big things i can glean from your posts are (in order of importance) that you may not be asking good questions and that you're not sending follow-ups. if i recall correctly, that interview guide that jane posted covers both topics pretty well. i use a lot of the questions recommended in there and i've had numerous interviewers who were completely surprised and impressed by my questions. and, just as importantly, they are good things to know about a potential job and employer. knowing how many people are in the running is really not very useful (interesting, but not useful) and is an odd question to ask. i could see people being turned off by that.

i don't think a follow-up will change an interviewer's mind if they don't want to hire you, but if it's close between you and another candidate, one that is thoughtful and well-written could tip the scales. there's not much point in doing it if you're just going to say "thanks for the interview, i look forward to hearing from you", but if you expand a little on what you learned in the interview, show that you were listening and are still thinking about the conversation you had, it can really impress people. at the job i ended up getting, my boss sent out an e-mail introducing me to the staff, and she actually pulled quotes from my cover letter and follow-up e-mails to demonstrate that i understand and care about the organization's mission. so when people tell you that hiring managers don't read or care about that stuff... well, sometimes they do.

if you get a rejection from the hiring manager, it doesn't generally hurt to respond to thank them for letting you know and ask if they have any feedback for you. they don't always respond (it's unusual if they do), but when they do, the constructive criticism can be invaluable. for instance, a friend of mine is a hiring manager and she interviewed someone who badmouthed his then-current boss, which is a HUGE mistake. if he'd asked her for feedback, he could have learned not to do that in the future. or they might tell you that you did great but they went with someone with xyz specific experience, which is also good to know and might boost your confidence a bit. you just have to be very careful with your tone and make sure it sounds like "hey, any advice for the future?" and not "WHY DIDN'T YOU HIRE ME TELL MEEEE!!!"

keep in mind, too, that the job market is just really tough right now. be very self-critical and improve everything you can about yourself and your interview technique, but also realize that the odds are against you and it's not always you.
Thank you for your good advice. I am realizing what I need to work on. I need to be more firm and not emotional like someone mentioned in the beginning and I also need to be more prepared. I research the companies but I need to research them even more prior to going to an interview. I also need to go over the job description to the smallest detail and make sure they I have backed up for what they are looking for. I also need to ask better questions .... and not ask questions like.. how many people are you interviewing. I guess I asked this cause I was cought of guard and did not know that else to ask ...

I have some more interviews coming up next week - and I will shift things around a bit and see how it goes.
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Old 08-02-2013, 05:41 PM
 
Location: Boston
177 posts, read 475,332 times
Reputation: 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by lifeexplorer View Post
The usefulness of a thank you letter or email is very limited. If you and others are super close - I haven't seen that in all my career, then it may be of some use.

It's a great thing that you are having interviews as it means your resume looks great and there are a lot of opportunities for you.

It may come down to simple interview skills unless you flank the technical questions. Hiring companies typically want to see if you do any of the following:
1. Speak bad about your previous employer or supervisor.
2. Speak bad about anything.
3. Have many questions about work hours.
4. Not focus on the questions asked - digress a lot.
5. Talk too much.
6. Talk about any company politics.
7. Bring up too many irrelevant personal stuff like wife, kids, divorce, mental issues etc.

You may think it's hard but actually it's easy: just stick to what is relevant to the job and keep any personal discussion to the minimal.

A woman actually has a huge advantage over men particularly in IT as long as you are relatively fit, dress up properly and speak properly. The IT field is so short of women, almost every employer wants women to be in their team - yes, I am in IT too.

I guess I should be thankful that I am getting calls and I also have new leads for next week and interviews are scheduled.

I don't think I flank the technical stuff at all. Usually the interviewer goes into technical talks at the interview and I feel comfortable talking about that. On numerous occasions I also had to take personality tests and technical evaluations prior on going to an interview and they said I did well on them.
I don't do anything about what you mentioned above. As much as I hate my former employer I would never talk bad about them... I was there for 3 years and I learned ALOT there.

I always thought being a woman in IT could count against me. I swear every interview I go too.. there is no woman in the group. Yes I am pretty fit and I don't have issues crawling around in data closets or moving stuff... I have done it all....
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Old 08-02-2013, 05:52 PM
 
Location: Boston
177 posts, read 475,332 times
Reputation: 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by caradvice View Post
Look.... If you're getting call backs to applications its not your resume... If your passing the phone screen then its not you're phone skills... If you're interviewing it may not be your interviewing skills... When a person continuously makes it through the hiring process and doesn't get an offer he/ she may be BLACKBALLED. It happens... Hire an agency to find out what former employers/ colleagues are saying about you... Remove connections from your LINKED profile that you worked with but didn't necessarily like.... some may say competition is fierce which it is but in a case like yours I would call BLACKBALLING all day all night long

You brought up a VERY good point.
Actually I removed all people that that I was connected to from my previous job from linkedin and facebook.
Well, how would they blackball me ... if the company has not checked my references ?
On of my references is my "e"x former boss. I say "ex" former boss cause they demoted him and hired a new IT manager.
I went on this interview a while back... with an agency and they called my references - actually my "ex" old boss and the agency said he spoke very highly of me.
Who knows maybe its my old coworker.. I don't want to talk bad - but she was evil. She became buddy buddy with the new IT manager and always hang out in his office and they would sit in the caf and eat lunch together. Excuse my language.. WT* .... I really think she disliked me a lot..
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Old 08-07-2013, 10:23 PM
 
Location: Boston
177 posts, read 475,332 times
Reputation: 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by jane_sm1th73 View Post
Another poster on c-d recommended a free ebook about interviewing. Not being one to turn down free advice, I downloaded it and read through it. It is very good! I would recommend it, in turn.

Here it is: the Ask a Manager guide to preparing for job interviews


Let's keep the chain of goodness going!

Best wishes to you.

I listened to this guide tonight and I found it extremely helpful !!!
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Old 08-30-2013, 09:38 PM
 
35 posts, read 39,770 times
Reputation: 67
Bingo, you just said it yourself. Start asking for business cards at the end of the interviews so that you can send thank you emails. Some companies really take those things seriously. As I was reading your story, I kept thinking, what is he/she doing wrong that no one has offered jobs? Your resume is on point, so is your background, you know how to dress and present yourself to an interview. But I don't know your interview style, do you answer all questions with ease and do you smile and make eye contact? I don't know if English is your first language, but if not, do you speak clearly? If you say yes to all of my questions, then maybe it could be something as simple as thank you notes or they might feel you are over qualified and will leave at the first opportunity. Then you must assure them when the interview is winding down that you are interested in working for their company and money is not that important to you at this time. when they ask if you have any questions for them, did you research the company and have a couple of really good questions to ask them about their company? I think you already know not to ask them about benefits, etc., that can be saved for when you are hired.
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Old 08-31-2013, 08:37 PM
FBJ
 
Location: Tall Building down by the river
39,615 posts, read 50,422,053 times
Reputation: 9451
1. Make sure interview feels like a conversation

2. Look excited to be in the presence of the interviewer

3. show interest in the company by asking the interviewer about their experience at the company

4. Talk about what you learned at the previous job and how u can make it work at that company

5. Try to have a little small talk before the interview starts to break the ice
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