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Old 08-03-2013, 10:57 AM
 
5 posts, read 8,656 times
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I'm posting this because not a lot of attention has been paid to it, from a job-seeker's point of view: the matter of candidate pipelining. Google the phrase to learn more.
According to HR industry articles that I've read, companies realize a savings in their recruitment when they accumulate a pipeline of candidates by advertising non-existent vacancies as though there were actual vacancies in the present. When companies are ready, if ever, they have a ready roster.

Meanwhile, job-seeker blogs and forums are rife with job search, cover letter, and resume angst. It's this angst that has them seeking advice on blogs and forums, perhaps needlessly. I've witnessed some posters taking the lack of employer response to their resumes personally. Many are wondering what they're doing wrong. Few, if any, of the advice givers point to the chance that their unanswered submissions are the unintended result of candidate pipelining. Perhaps because few people recognize the practice or are unaware as to what extent it occurs.

I suspect that major job boards like Monster.com, and Indeed.com, Snag-a-Job, and others, are full of advertisements for positions that are yet in the making, or for positions already filled but for the purpose of having replacements queued up in the event they should become vacant.

Should HR departments be more receptive to unsolicited resumes instead, and reserve their vacancy advertisements for actual vacancies?

How can a job seeker be sure that a vacancy actually exists, to preserve his or her resources for productive searches? It's not good enough to ask a company, simply, whether or not they are actually hiring. Often the answer to that yes or no questions is "well, just fill out an application (or submit a resume)."

Has anyone here managed to successfully weed out the candidate pipeliners??

I ask because I've found the practice of candidate pipelining to be a serious displacement of job search resources, especially when companies prospect ahead 3, 6, or 12 months into the future.
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Old 08-03-2013, 10:59 AM
 
12,299 posts, read 15,190,901 times
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I don't know of any way to stay out of the pipeline. For years employment agencies have placed ads even when they are no openings so they can present a bunch to a client when an opening does occur.
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Old 08-03-2013, 11:10 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
29,777 posts, read 54,424,430 times
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The chances of a real opening are greater when you see it on the company's website rather than just on the job boards, but there's no sure way to know.
We will include a timeline, indicating the last date to file, and when we expect the position to be filled. If it's a retirement and we need specialized skills it may be 2-3 months down the road, but most of the time we will fill it as soon as possible (and don't ever "pipeline").

To answer your question "Should HR departments be more receptive to unsolicited resumes instead, and reserve their vacancy advertisements for actual vacancies?"

No and yes. We don't accept resumes except for specific openings and it wastes time to have to throw them out, but it would be better if companies only advertised for available openings. On the other hand I would not consider any kind of law preventing it. Eventually they may find that it hurts them in the manner of the old "boy who cried wolf."
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Old 08-03-2013, 11:12 AM
 
5 posts, read 8,656 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
I don't know of any way to stay out of the pipeline. For years employment agencies have placed ads even when they are no openings so they can present a bunch to a client when an opening does occur.
Yes, one would expect that from placement agencies but the practice has expanded to companies that direct-hire.
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Old 08-03-2013, 11:19 AM
 
5 posts, read 8,656 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
The chances of a real opening are greater when you see it on the company's website rather than just on the job boards, but there's no sure way to know.
We will include a timeline, indicating the last date to file, and when we expect the position to be filled. If it's a retirement and we need specialized skills it may be 2-3 months down the road, but most of the time we will fill it as soon as possible (and don't ever "pipeline").

To answer your question "Should HR departments be more receptive to unsolicited resumes instead, and reserve their vacancy advertisements for actual vacancies?"

No and yes. We don't accept resumes except for specific openings and it wastes time to have to throw them out, but it would be better if companies only advertised for available openings. On the other hand I would not consider any kind of law preventing it. Eventually they may find that it hurts them in the manner of the old "boy who cried wolf."
Your observation [in bold] seems like a reliable indication of what a company's intentions are, at least in the foreseeable future. I don't think a law against candidate pipelining is the answer either.
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Old 08-03-2013, 11:36 AM
 
Location: Western Washington
8,936 posts, read 8,400,927 times
Reputation: 15542
My organization also lists only legitimate jobs. Some are a posted a few months prior to the anticipated start date, but that is also clearly noted in the posting.

I really see no benefit to a corporation in posting jobs that do not exist unless they have a horrendous turnover; in essence they are always hiring.

I doubt that there is really any foolproof way to avoid this from an applicants viewpoint though. I never had much success with monster et al. I used these aggregator sites as a resource to give me info on job titles and companies. I would then go directly to the company website.

To the best of my memory, I only received one nibble from monster, compared to an 80%+ response rate from the places I submitted to directly.

The real takeaway is not to put too much hope into any one application. Send out applications, record them in a log so that you know what you have done, then move on to the next one.
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Old 08-03-2013, 11:52 AM
 
5 posts, read 8,656 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by fishbrains View Post
My organization also lists only legitimate jobs. Some are a posted a few months prior to the anticipated start date, but that is also clearly noted in the posting.

I really see no benefit to a corporation in posting jobs that do not exist unless they have a horrendous turnover; in essence they are always hiring.

I doubt that there is really any foolproof way to avoid this from an applicants viewpoint though. I never had much success with monster et al. I used these aggregator sites as a resource to give me info on job titles and companies. I would then go directly to the company website.

To the best of my memory, I only received one nibble from monster, compared to an 80%+ response rate from the places I submitted to directly.

The real takeaway is not to put too much hope into any one application. Send out applications, record them in a log so that you know what you have done, then move on to the next one.
I think in my area there is a great deal of uncertainty amongst employers, perhaps. Your success rate with applications at employer websites vs monster et al is an appreciable difference. Hemlock140 said the same thing more or less, that advertisements at employer websites are more reliable than the job boards. Thanks to both of you.
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