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Old 10-12-2013, 02:24 PM
 
1,115 posts, read 1,993,257 times
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Hey all,

I was recently at a conference last week and one session I attended was about "secrets" to the Job Hunt. One note the speaker made was that when we see a job posting online, we should pretty much copy and paste the exact skills and requirements in the job posting right onto our resumes. (Of course only if we actually meet that skill or requirement!). He said computer filtering software for resumes are a really big obstacle job seekers need to get past, and that the software is looking for "exact" matches in the system. Therefore, by copying the qualifications exactly, we become the perfect match, getting our resume to the top of the pile. For example, if we are able to do all the job posting requirements and have them on our resume, we essentially become a 100% match and the computer tells the user that and puts our resume at the very top.

example, if one bullet point of a job posting says "3 years of experience in the IT industry", we should copy that phrase and throw it on our resume under our skills or qualifications section. The same goes for more specific requirements.

My question is, doesn't that seem a bit.... forced? I feel like if I was a hiring manager reading resumes and saw someone's resume was an exact copy paste of the job posting (of course job experience can remain unique though), I would think that really sappy and lame.... However, I think the point the speaker was trying to make is that it's computers reading our resumes, not people, so we "got to beat the system".

I rambled on enough though, is it looked down upon, or a negative thing, to copy and paste exact job qualifications and requirements from the job posting onto your resume?
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Old 10-12-2013, 02:31 PM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
28,482 posts, read 62,084,629 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the_grimace View Post
...we should pretty much copy and paste the exact skills and requirements in the job posting
My question is, doesn't that seem a bit.... forced?
So what? It's like high school history teachers looking for the ego stroke of their phrasing.

Quote:
...and saw someone's resume was an exact copy paste of the job posting
Did someone say to copy their entirety of the post or just a few of the key phrases they used?

So yeah, don't copy/paste entire tracts.
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Old 10-12-2013, 02:40 PM
 
1,115 posts, read 1,993,257 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrRational View Post
So what? It's like high school history teachers looking for the ego stroke of their phrasing.

Did someone say to copy their entirety of the post or just a few of the key phrases they used?

So yeah, don't copy/paste entire tracts.
Basically when you see a job posting, you would copy all the bullet points (that you can do) under sections labeled:

Qualifications
Skills
Requirements
Pluses

you would then include your previous work experience and education like you normally would.
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Old 10-12-2013, 02:40 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
5,904 posts, read 7,015,604 times
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I've never seen it done by software, but I've seen HR people rate candidates (in interviews and on paper) based solely on repeating portions of the job description and to stick with their ratings when it is obvious to anybody with technical knowledge that one person was just repeated the job description and the other was far more qualified.

Repeat the exact qualifications and requirements until you can talk to a potential future supervisor or something.
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Old 10-12-2013, 03:02 PM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
28,482 posts, read 62,084,629 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the_grimace View Post
Basically when you see a job posting, you would copy all the bullet points...
er, no.
You scan their text to extract the key and pertinent terms and phrasing from their text...
then you **artfully** work these terms and phrases into your own text.
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Old 10-12-2013, 04:01 PM
 
11,118 posts, read 8,523,617 times
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Yeah, I thought it was common knowledge to put keywords/phrases from the ad in your resume in case the employer uses a keyword filter.

You wouldn't want to copy multiple sentences word for word.
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Old 10-12-2013, 04:29 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by charlygal View Post
Yeah, I thought it was common knowledge to put keywords/phrases from the ad in your resume in case the employer uses a keyword filter.

You wouldn't want to copy multiple sentences word for word.
That's what I thought. The way the speaker talked about it was copying things word for word. Once again, his reasoning was that this allowed you to be a 100% match as shown by the computer software. I thought this seemed like a bit too much...
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Old 10-12-2013, 04:32 PM
 
134 posts, read 167,518 times
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If the job listing says something like

BS or MS in computer science or equivalent
- 5+ years hands-on experience in developing and launching enterprise web apps
- Expert or knowledge of some combination of JavaScript, C++, PHP, Python or Ruby
- Experience with web applications, databases (MySQL) and security a plus
- Impressive coding skills across all key languages/environments
- Experience selecting, utilizing and managing cloud service providers
- Familiar with current state and functionality of web based ERP, CRM and customer service platforms (Salesforce, SugarCRM, NetSuite, Financial Force, ZenDesk)
- Demonstrated history of completing major product ship cycles
- Experience across multiple companies at varying sizes
- Excellent manager, strong mentor and able to build, manage and retain a team while operating at a senior capacity



then the scanner will probably just be looking for words like "JavaScript", "C++", "PHP", "Python", "Ruby", etc. If you're qualified, then you should already have those on your resume. The exact phrases in which they appear won't matter. Thus, I don't think it's necessary to tailor your resume for the scanner unless you're being disingenuous about your skill set.
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Old 10-12-2013, 04:53 PM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
28,482 posts, read 62,084,629 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CodeViolationMcEnroe View Post
The exact phrases in which they appear won't matter.
Until/unless you run into an actual human being at some point.
Then it matters a lot.

Quote:
I don't think it's necessary to tailor your resume for the scanner...
The "scan" referred to above is the HUMAN eye and mind.
And (for the time being at least) it is absolutely important to write for other humans.
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Old 10-12-2013, 04:57 PM
 
1,115 posts, read 1,993,257 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrRational View Post
Until/unless you run into an actual human being at some point.
Then it matters a lot.


The "scan" referred to above is the HUMAN eye and mind.
And (for the time being at least) it is absolutely important to write for other humans.
The point the speaker was trying to make that you could have the best and most qualified resume of the bunch, but if something hit the keywords more than you, they are going to get looked at first, and yours frankly might not get looked at at all. He mentioned that computer scanning software (he develops computer scanning software btw as a computer programmer) will rank resumes based on how many keywords were hit, and how often. (So including important keywords multiple times in different sections of your resume helps a lot). He said that most employers he talked to simply would pull the top 10 or so BEST RANKING resumes as judged by the computer scanner, and they almost always hired from that initial batch. In other words, if you're not hitting a ton of the keywords, you're resume is never going to get seen. Vice versa if your resume hits all the keywords the computer is looking for and puts it at the very top of the list, your resume will be the first one seen my human eyes.
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