U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment > Job Search
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-05-2013, 06:31 PM
 
35,108 posts, read 40,610,704 times
Reputation: 62084

Advertisements

That is a tough one really. I see it as a lie but it could really have been a mistake on the part of the candidate when they were doing the resume.

I think I would ask them to clarify again what they meant when they wrote "Senior" on the resume then make the decision from there.

If they really are already doing the job then they should have the title already and it would be a lateral transfer.
If they are "qualified" to do the job but do not have the official title then their resume is a lie.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-05-2013, 08:02 PM
 
Location: S. Florida
1,100 posts, read 2,672,937 times
Reputation: 1419
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cardiff Giant View Post
I have an ethics question for the board. I am currently interviewing candidates for a supervisory position in my organization. After completing the second round of interviews, I have come to find that my top pick listed an incorrect job title on his/her resume. The candidate works in another division of the organization that I work for so I was able to look them up in the system to determine what the actual job title is.

The title he/she listed is the same as his/her actual title except the candidate added the word "senior" to it. Personally, I don't think it's ok to lie on your resume but I don't necessarily think this infraction is worth losing a good candidate over. My department head on the other hand, feels that this candidate should be automatically disqualified. I'm sure I could argue my case and probably win as I am the hiring manager but on the other hand I don't think it would be smart to go against my bosses boss in the long run. Especially if this hire turns out to be a dud.

What do you think?
I am going to be the devil's advocate here. If he lied on his resume, what else will he be lieing about? It's about integrity. He got caught with a seemingly benign word by adding "Senior." But he is NOT the senior manager. My advise is not to go against your department head's decision. You don't want him/her second guessing your future judgement/hiring skills or integrity.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-05-2013, 08:52 PM
 
Location: NJ
18,677 posts, read 17,170,753 times
Reputation: 7282
Quote:
Originally Posted by mom2justynsarah View Post
I am going to be the devil's advocate here. If he lied on his resume, what else will he be lieing about? It's about integrity. He got caught with a seemingly benign word by adding "Senior." But he is NOT the senior manager. My advise is not to go against your department head's decision. You don't want him/her second guessing your future judgement/hiring skills or integrity.
I agree with one caveat. I'd ask the candidate face to face so you can see his reaction if there is anything on his application and/or resume which is NOT 100% accurate. I'd tell him I realize it does occur , even inadvertently , on occasion, and before going forward we need to know if you stand behind everything you have submitted 100%.

If he answers "Yes, I stand by all", disqualify him from consideration for the position. If he owns up to the mistruth you have uncovered, press the case with your boss' boss that given his candor when given a second chance, you think of it as a forgiveable offense.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-05-2013, 09:12 PM
 
Location: Dallas TX
15,102 posts, read 21,918,970 times
Reputation: 22538
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cardiff Giant View Post
Yes, the candidate is interviewing for the "Sr" position. The red flag came up when they said "I'm already doing the job, I just want the title" but the candidate already had the title according to their resume.

Thanks for the replies so far. I am going to check references either way.
Maybe I am reading this I guess I need more clarification. It sounds as if a question was asked, and this answer is taken out of context.

So answering "I am doing all the work of a senior position, I did deserve a raise. However I was happy they gave me the title." Perhaps you misunderstood?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-05-2013, 09:28 PM
 
2,633 posts, read 5,544,825 times
Reputation: 2871
Quote:
Originally Posted by veuvegirl View Post
Maybe I am reading this I guess I need more clarification. It sounds as if a question was asked, and this answer is taken out of context.

So answering "I am doing all the work of a senior position, I did deserve a raise. However I was happy they gave me the title." Perhaps you misunderstood?
How the heck of you get this out of "I'm doing the job right now, I just want the title"?

No mention of a raise
Specifically said he did not have the title, but wanted it
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-05-2013, 09:42 PM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado
544 posts, read 1,217,848 times
Reputation: 602
I think you should go with your gut instinct. I've modified titles on my resumes as well as duties. It's called "tailoring" your resume to fit the job. If he truly is already doing the work of a "senior" position is he really lying? No. I don't think it's cocky or arrogant to list that title on his resume. I also think it could be an oversight, that he had the job title he was applying for stuck in his mind and then put it down as his title. If he's the most qualified candidate, I wouldn't discount him for a mistake like that. Your the one who has to work with him directly. If you get to make the final decision then I would do it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-05-2013, 09:48 PM
 
3,083 posts, read 4,684,184 times
Reputation: 3524
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cardiff Giant View Post
I have an ethics question for the board. I am currently interviewing candidates for a supervisory position in my organization. After completing the second round of interviews, I have come to find that my top pick listed an incorrect job title on his/her resume. The candidate works in another division of the organization that I work for so I was able to look them up in the system to determine what the actual job title is.

The title he/she listed is the same as his/her actual title except the candidate added the word "senior" to it. Personally, I don't think it's ok to lie on your resume but I don't necessarily think this infraction is worth losing a good candidate over. My department head on the other hand, feels that this candidate should be automatically disqualified. I'm sure I could argue my case and probably win as I am the hiring manager but on the other hand I don't think it would be smart to go against my bosses boss in the long run. Especially if this hire turns out to be a dud.

What do you think?
Can you ask them to elaborate on that title discrepancy? Is it possible that they may have received some sort of promotion that wasn't updated in the company system?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-05-2013, 09:48 PM
 
1,092 posts, read 1,283,713 times
Reputation: 737
he made a mistake.......
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-05-2013, 10:05 PM
 
9,023 posts, read 8,210,396 times
Reputation: 19605
If he/her was doing the work of a senior, he and even his supervisor may have considered he was the senior without having to give him/her the money, or they were not budgeted for the senior position. I have a daughter that did the work of the supervisor for a major international company heading the IT department for 2 years, before they could get her budgeted in to give her title.

Ask his/her department head if the work he/she was doing was acting as the senior without making it official.--OR--Call the person in for a second interview, and ask them why they put senior on the application. .
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-05-2013, 10:13 PM
 
9,844 posts, read 17,151,557 times
Reputation: 18560
Is he senior in his field (even though he does not have a senior title)? Is he doing senior level work? Does his boss refer to him as a senior or give him some type of honorific title (I have seen this several times)? He could be full of BS or there could be a reasonable explanation.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment > Job Search
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top