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Old 12-10-2013, 02:46 PM
 
Location: Tucson for awhile longer
8,872 posts, read 13,547,969 times
Reputation: 29032

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Quote:
Originally Posted by MSchemist80 View Post
Resumes are like arm pits everyone has one and everyone thinks everybody elses stinks.
That's absurd. Some resumes ARE terrible. Not everyone's, but an unfortunate number. The OP is quite correct in observing that resumes get worse as Americans' communication skills deteriorate (which they have; that's not merely my opinion). The issues mentioned by the OP are simple, common expectations in the business world.

So many people come to this C-D forum and complain about their problems in finding a job. It seems reasonable to me that they be advised to look at their resumes for the first answer to the question, "Why can't I get an interview?" A sloppy resume communicates a lack of respect to its readers.

If I were a hiring manager, every resume I read that was rife with errors and poor writing would immediately go in the trash. I don't care if the author has a PhD from Harvard. Any perspective employee who thinks so little about a hiring manager that he or she would submit a poorly thought out, unproofread, badly formatted resume is not worthy of consideration because communication skills are a vital part of every job. A terrible resume is especially ridiculous because tools to help anyone create a proper resume can be found online, as well as in public libraries. Even templates are available for free.

Fact of professional life: your resume represents you. If readers think it's a mess, then they will inevitably assume that YOU are a mess.

Last edited by Jukesgrrl; 12-10-2013 at 02:56 PM..
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Old 12-10-2013, 02:55 PM
 
Location: Tucson for awhile longer
8,872 posts, read 13,547,969 times
Reputation: 29032
Quote:
Originally Posted by mkpunk View Post
The problem I find is you ask two people for their opinion, they give opposite opinions. What do you do in that case.
Some aspects of resume writing are subjective. But most aren't. Proper grammar, correct spelling, concise writing, consistency, an easy-to-read format, and brevity are the areas of primary concern. No one needs multiple people to judge that. Resume writing isn't an Olympic sport.
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Old 12-10-2013, 03:29 PM
 
Location: Buckeye, AZ
27,307 posts, read 15,772,260 times
Reputation: 9861
Quote:
Originally Posted by spencgr View Post
Make sure you are asking the right people. You want people who recently have been hired to higher level professional positions, ideally in your field. Asking someone who has been in the same position for 30 years is not going to help you very much, no matter how "smart" they are (although, they should be able to correct spelling and grammar.)
That doesn't help. You can ask higher level people in your field and get different answers. Some want specific resume styles.

Quote:
Originally Posted by I'm Retired Now View Post
You better get up to speed on resume writing. The accomplishment statements are the most important part of your resume. Here is something to read about this:

Developing "WOW" Accomplishments for Your Resume
I've read that and it is hard to do that for many jobs. Why because you are an individual cog. Unless you have an exact I can type 70 words per minute, I rung up an average of 500 items in an hour, it is hard to do.

As for accomplishments, I've done some such as becoming Eagle Scout and being apart of many boy scout events. However most people just pass on that. One interviewer even asked my brother (a fellow Eagle Scout) "What is an Eagle Scout and why should that impress me?"
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Old 12-10-2013, 03:38 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
4,370 posts, read 5,142,420 times
Reputation: 3896
Actually for IT or engineering jobs multi page resumes are common and very much encourage. A short resume would actually work against you, since it'll lack relevant details
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Old 12-10-2013, 04:01 PM
 
1,006 posts, read 1,868,308 times
Reputation: 1556
Quote:
Originally Posted by the_grimace View Post
5. Including personal information
- no, just no. This is stuff like including a picture of yourself, or your hobbies, or other tidbits of information like church goer and father of four, or single mom who knows how to dance, or avid basketball and football player. STOP, why the hell do you think your hobbies are going to qualify you for the job. Sadly, lots of people do this.

The other points were mostly valid IMO, but i disagree with this one. I don't use it on my resume, but due include it as part of a "fact sheet" submitted to each person i interview with, along with 30/60/90 plan etc. But on the resume could be OK for some people.

The reason i think it helps is that it shows you are a well rounded person with diverse interests. There is also the chance that someone will have the same interest or hobby and that will spark a conversation and bond. It will make me stick out if you as the hiring manager share my love for aboriginal artwork or craft beer.
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Old 12-10-2013, 04:05 PM
 
8,976 posts, read 8,102,339 times
Reputation: 19496
Quote:
As for accomplishments, I've done some such as becoming Eagle Scout and being apart of many boy scout events. However most people just pass on that. One interviewer even asked my brother (a fellow Eagle Scout) "What is an Eagle Scout and why should that impress me?"
As someone that back in my corporate days, hired hundreds of people, and read thousands of resumes, I can tell you that being an Eagle Scout has no place on a resume. Who cares. You may think it is a great accomplishment, but should only be on a resume if you are applying for something to do with boy scouts.

A resume, is to sell the employer on you as a prospective employer and tells why you should have that job. The Hiring Manager will not care what your hobbies are, is you were a boy scout or eagle scout, they don't have time when seeing your resume to waste their time on this type of unneeded information.

Fact: If the resume does not impress the potential employer within 20 to 30 seconds, your are going to be rejected as they move on to the next resume. A two page resume, is maximum size. If the person reading the resume sees 8 pages as an example, they are not going to read it. They know that the resume has everything but the kitchen sink in it, and just go on to another one.

Fact: Every resume submitted, should be specifically designed for the one job you are applying for. NEVER, and I mean NEVER use a one size fits all resume. Submit one that shows your qualifications for a specific job. General 1 size fits all resumes, do not get you hired. If you want a job, with the ability we have using a computer, we can tailor each resume for a specific job, so do it.

A few years ago, my church asked me to help several people with their resumes. I am going to use a real world example to show you what needs to be done.

A young family man, could not get a job. I saw his resume. He had gone to college as a music major on a scholarship, and also took business courses. His resume, sounded like he wanted a job in music, hardly mentioning he had 8 years experience as a cabinet maker, and doing fine finish work on custom homes. He wanted a job as a carpenter. We re-wrote his resume doing it right, so he could submit it to a place he had applied to (larges contractor firm in the area) twice before. He had to leave town on Sunday due to a death in his family.

His wife took in the resume on Monday. They checked it and called in the owner from the back office. He took a look at the new resume, and told the wife to have her husband come in first thing in the morning on Friday (he was returning Thursday evening). He showed up and found they did not want him for a framer as he had applied for. What they needed was a supervisor in charge of buying and overseeing the installation of cabinetry in homes, and the installation of putting in the trim etc., on fine homes. Twice the salary he was expecting, and went to work that same day.

A good example of how a good resume, can get you a job when a bad resume leaves you unemployed.

Go to your library, and you will find some books on resume writing. Learn how to do it right, and submit a resume specifically designed for the job you want. In today's market place that resume is the difference between getting a job, and not getting one.

As pointed out, make sure it is free of spelling errors, which if there are errors, it shows you are a sloppy person, that does not pay attention to what you are doing when we all have spelling checkers on the programs used to prepare the resume.

Use only 1 font, and use a business type fonts, not one of the flowery ones. And only print it in black ink.

Be uniform. Example pointed out by another poster of using bold one place and not another. If you Bold the job title on one job, bold it on all. Again it shows you pay attention to detail.

Use a good grade paper for your resume, not some combination copy/printer paper from a dollar store. Look professional in what you are doing.

Want a job, do it right. If you like being on unemployment, submit a poor resume.
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Old 12-10-2013, 04:08 PM
 
1,006 posts, read 1,868,308 times
Reputation: 1556
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kineticity View Post
Most people don't need to have a professional write it.

That said, hell, *I* will offer to write, edit or proofread a resume for anyone who asks me. (I've worked as a freelance copy editor and proofreader for years, as a sideline.)
But theres the difference. You might be an excellent wordsmith and master of the language. But what do you know about the Kenexa HR system that scans 1200 resumes a minute, archives and ranks based on a unique score derived from a proprietary algorithm? A resume expert knows how to game the system and write well, upping your chances that a real person ever even looks at your resume. They know what the program will key on and what will cause it to pass. For professional positions, there is no excuse for not having a professional resume done.
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Old 12-10-2013, 04:19 PM
 
Location: South Hampton Roads
203 posts, read 262,323 times
Reputation: 363
Quote:
Originally Posted by the_grimace View Post
Disclaimer: I am not a recruiter, HR rep, or Hiring Manager.

I am part of an email list that occasional posts jobs and shares resumes for people looking for work in my industry. I am a mid level design professional, and am not any type of hiring manager, but I get to see many other people's resumes through this email list. I also have seen many others' resumes through work when we were making additions to the team, as well as various acquaintances' resumes from various channels. There is one common theme.

They are all terrible...

I feel that as if everything that I've learned about proper resume writing has been wiped off the map and apparently doesn't matter anymore. Things like proper grammar, succinct information, proper formatting, neatness, etc. etc., no one seems to care about it anymore. As someone that takes great care in putting together a very nice resume for each position, I'm beginning to feel my time is wasted as my success rate is not astonishing, but the effort I put into the resumes is very high. It's upsetting to see such horrible resumes being accepted by companies. Let me share some examples of the common resume gaffs I typically see that A LOT OF PEOPLE do.

1. Long resumes
- Just a couple weeks ago, there was a resume of a guy who had an 8 page resume. 8 PAGES..... He pretty much described every position with 2-3 paragraphs of description (written style, not bullet points), and the formatting was awful. His resume was a mess of different font types, styles, and sizes. This guy was only a senior level designer as well, but even if he had 20 years of experience you don't need more than 3 pages max. I couldn't believe it, how this guy would ever get hired, but yet this guy had a respectable work history.

2. Grammatical errors
- ughhh, come on people, spell check and proofread. Yes, I see many resumes with typos, and it seems to be more and more acceptable. One resume I saw a couple months ago probably had around 20 typos... was this guy drunk when making his resume? Another guy spelled his name wrong (it was in two different places on the resume spelled differently), yet another guy spelled the state he lived in wrong. Minor punctuation errors might be ok to overlook (depending on if you're an english nazi or not), but you wouldn't believe just how many people have resumes with lots of words spelled terribly wrong. Very sad.

3. Absolutely crap formatting
- the person's name and address is randomly floating somewhere at the top, a phone number is placed off center in a corner, paragraphs aren't aligned and text is all over the place. So many resumes have no sense of space or format, rather just snippets of text randomly placed over the pages. You would think that designers and artists (whom most of the resumes I view are from) would take care with this kind of stuff.

4. Inconsistent styling
- a minor point, but still one that lends to the overall look of your resume. I see so many resumes that will use inconsistent text style options. Like using one font in one area, and another font in the next, then back to the first font. Or bolding a certain part of your resume, like a job title, but not bolding it for the next job entry. Or using different size fonts.... sadly I see different sized fonts, I'm talking about one paragraph being like size 10 font, and the next size 11, not just something like a job title or header being bigger font.

5. Including personal information
- no, just no. This is stuff like including a picture of yourself, or your hobbies, or other tidbits of information like church goer and father of four, or single mom who knows how to dance, or avid basketball and football player. STOP, why the hell do you think your hobbies are going to qualify you for the job. Sadly, lots of people do this.

And what happens in the end? These people get jobs because their resumes are being shared on a private "hidden market" email list and at the end of the day it's more about word of mouth references than who can put together a proper resume.

Anyone else have any stories about terrible resumes they have seen? I still can't believe the 8 page one...
LOL - people don't want to take the time to learn. Resume writing and creating is painstaking - lol. People just don't want to put in the time to do it.

Now what would be really interesting to know is are these folks getting the jobs they are going after?? lol
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Old 12-10-2013, 04:48 PM
 
5,532 posts, read 5,974,979 times
Reputation: 3155
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smooth23 View Post
I feel like this same post crops up about once a month... Why don't people worry about their own resume instead of others'?
Wait, now I want to post this next month.
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Old 12-10-2013, 05:22 PM
 
3,072 posts, read 4,276,420 times
Reputation: 6512
In the US/Canada, there is no reason to add hobbies or interests unless it is directly relevant. If you are applying for an accountant's position, don't waste your time writing about competitive biking. If you are applying for a personal trainer position, then of course go right ahead. Remember, the more you write, the easier it is to skip over critical information. Sometimes people are so concern with looking "well-rounded" that they forget you will be remembered as the hiker and not the guy with the 3.9 GPA or whatever.
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